I shake at 80 + - Dodge Challenger Forum: Challenger & SRT8 Forums
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post #1 of 29 (permalink) Old 09-19-2013, 09:56 AM Thread Starter
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I shake at 80 +

Had my car back to the dealer 3 times for the front end shaking. Now that the warranty is over I would like to take it to a place where there is expertise in such matters.

At around 80mph the shimmy is pretty bad . The dealer did a front end balance, high speed balance, and the third time told me my newly replaces tires at 20m were the problem. I asked them to swap tires from the other 10 challengers on the lot, to be sure, but nooooo they would not.

So I live in the Allentown Pa area....Anyone know a good place?

2010 SRT8 6 speed
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post #2 of 29 (permalink) Old 09-19-2013, 10:26 AM
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find someone with a roadforce balancer, this type of balancer in the hands of an experience tech can do magic, a roadforce balancer will allow matching of tires and wheel, will also calculate runout, as well as lateral runout and will measure excessive roadforce, a wheel & tire assembly can be balance the old fashion way and still cause a vibration, note, any tires with more than 15 or so lbs of roadforce, especially on a sport type car with 20's should be replace, total roadforce of the wheel assembly should not be more than 15 or so lbs

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Thats pretty good! I get the shakes sometimes and I'm only 50...
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Doesn't do it at around 40 as well?

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What is Road Force Measurement™?


Road Force Measurement™

Road Force Measurement™ is new to the automotive service industry. This new measurement identifies tire and wheel uniformity, which has been measured for years in assembly plants and manufacturing facilities. Road Force can be used to solve uniformity related tire and wheel vibrations. Tire/wheel assembly uniformity can only be measured under load.

The load roller on the GSP9700 performs a computer simulated "road test". It measures the tire/wheel assembly to determine how "round" the assembly is when rolling under a load. If a tire were not exposed to the road surface, then balance would be more than sufficient. However, not all tires roll round under a load. For example, an egg-shaped tire/wheel assembly can be balanced about its axis, but an egg-shaped tire-wheel loaded against a surface would not give a smooth ride.

To understand the effects of radial force variation on vibration, a model of a tire can be used. The sidewall and footprint can be understood as a collection of springs between the rim and the tire contact patch. If the "springs" are not of uniform stiffness, a varied force is exerted on the axle and causes it to move up and down as the tire rotates and flexes. This movement creates a vibration in the vehicle unrelated to balance.

The GSP9700 load roller applies a force of up to 1400 pounds against the rotating tire/wheel assembly as it performs the Road Force Measurement™. The GSP9700 measures loaded radial runout of the tire/wheel assembly within 0.002". It plots data points as the component is rotated and calculates the radial first harmonic of the tire/wheel assembly and the first harmonic of wheel runout. The peak-to-peak value (Total Indicated Runout) and second, third and fourth harmonics of Road Force are also calculated and used for diagnostics. These measurements are all displayed on other screens.

The measurements of loaded radial runout are converted to Road Force Measurement in pounds, kilograms or Newtons using the following equation:

(Loaded Radial Runout) x (Tire Spring Rate) = Road Force Measurement Radial Force Variation

Radial force variation is an industrial measurement term describing the tire uniformity under load, measuring the variation (up and down) of the load acting on the vehicle spindle (SAE practice J332).

All tires have some non-uniformity in the sidewall and/or footprint due to variables in the manufacturing process. Tire uniformity measurement values can be affected by rim width, rim condition and many diverse tire mounting variables. Unlike balancing, there is often a small amount of RFV remaining in the tire/wheel assembly after ForceMatching and this is generally acceptable.

First Order Radial Force Variation


Radial Force Variation vs. Unloaded Runout

In the manufacturing community, tire uniformity is called radial force variation. The uniformity of most tires manufactured today is measured with a machine in accordance to SAE practice J332. This practice is widely used in the tire industry and describes tire testing equipment and procedures used to measure radial force variation of the tire. This practice stresses the importance of measuring force variation while the tire is under load and does not acknowledge unloaded runout measurement.

Many tire assembly plants have large production lines to measure loaded tire force variation. Tires, which do not meet uniformity specifications, may be brought into specification through additional manufacturer's procedures called force grinding. Force grinding is done to improve radial force variation by removing small areas of rubber from the sides and footprint of the tread. Force grinding may not improve (and in some cases may increase) the unloaded runout measurement.

A tire with large amounts of unloaded radial runout may be vibration free while a tire with low unloaded radial runout may vibrate. In many cases, tire manufacturers will forego unloaded runout measurement since this information is not as valuable as tire force variation when it comes to analyzing the causes of tire ride disturbances.

In the past, when trying to resolve tire/wheel vibration concerns, service facilities were unable to measure tire force variation. The size and expense of the factory machines were cost prohibitive. In order to compensate for this lack of field service technology, many automotive and tire manufacturers have published service limits for unloaded runout in the tire/wheel assembly.

A standard industry practice has been to measure unloaded runout in the center of the tire tread using a relatively inexpensive gauge. However, this measurement has little relationship to the actual amount of ride disturbance felt in the vehicle. For example, a set of springs may have an unloaded height measurement of equal length, yet when compressed may create different forces at the same compressed height.

Radial Force Vibration Placed in Perspective

In the past, most tire/wheel assembly vibration was considered balance related. Because of this, tire service professionals tend to relate tire/wheel vibration in terms of balance weight. Road Force will be best understood when related to the amount of balance weight required to cause a similar vibration in a wheel that rolls round under a load. In other words, "How much Road Force creates a similar vibration caused by tire imbalance?

Most tire service professionals and factory service manuals agree that residual static imbalance should not exceed .30 oz. on average size wheels and .60 oz. on larger light duty truck wheels.

Radial Force is determined by measuring loaded radial runout. On an average passenger car tire/wheel assembly, one thousandth of an inch (0.001") of loaded radial runout is equivalent to approximately one pound of Road Force.

Tests on a Chevrolet Lumina were performed using a chassis dynamometer in a Detroit test lab. The purpose of the test was to determine how much balance weight would be required to produce the same magnitude of force as a measured amount of loaded radial runout.

The tests were performed with the vehicle running at different speeds. The first test was at 50 miles per hour and the second test at 70 miles per hour.

At 50 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as 1.5 ounces (42 grams) of wheel imbalance at 50 mph. This is 5 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.

At 70 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as .75 ounces (21 grams) of wheel imbalance at 70 mph. This is 1 1/2 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.

What is Road Force Measurement™?


Road Force Measurement™

Road Force Measurement™ is new to the automotive service industry. This new measurement identifies tire and wheel uniformity, which has been measured for years in assembly plants and manufacturing facilities. Road Force can be used to solve uniformity related tire and wheel vibrations. Tire/wheel assembly uniformity can only be measured under load.

The load roller on the GSP9700 performs a computer simulated "road test". It measures the tire/wheel assembly to determine how "round" the assembly is when rolling under a load. If a tire were not exposed to the road surface, then balance would be more than sufficient. However, not all tires roll round under a load. For example, an egg-shaped tire/wheel assembly can be balanced about its axis, but an egg-shaped tire-wheel loaded against a surface would not give a smooth ride.

To understand the effects of radial force variation on vibration, a model of a tire can be used. The sidewall and footprint can be understood as a collection of springs between the rim and the tire contact patch. If the "springs" are not of uniform stiffness, a varied force is exerted on the axle and causes it to move up and down as the tire rotates and flexes. This movement creates a vibration in the vehicle unrelated to balance.

The GSP9700 load roller applies a force of up to 1400 pounds against the rotating tire/wheel assembly as it performs the Road Force Measurement™. The GSP9700 measures loaded radial runout of the tire/wheel assembly within 0.002". It plots data points as the component is rotated and calculates the radial first harmonic of the tire/wheel assembly and the first harmonic of wheel runout. The peak-to-peak value (Total Indicated Runout) and second, third and fourth harmonics of Road Force are also calculated and used for diagnostics. These measurements are all displayed on other screens.

The measurements of loaded radial runout are converted to Road Force Measurement in pounds, kilograms or Newtons using the following equation:

(Loaded Radial Runout) x (Tire Spring Rate) = Road Force Measurement Radial Force Variation

Radial force variation is an industrial measurement term describing the tire uniformity under load, measuring the variation (up and down) of the load acting on the vehicle spindle (SAE practice J332).

All tires have some non-uniformity in the sidewall and/or footprint due to variables in the manufacturing process. Tire uniformity measurement values can be affected by rim width, rim condition and many diverse tire mounting variables. Unlike balancing, there is often a small amount of RFV remaining in the tire/wheel assembly after ForceMatching and this is generally acceptable.

First Order Radial Force Variation


Radial Force Variation vs. Unloaded Runout

In the manufacturing community, tire uniformity is called radial force variation. The uniformity of most tires manufactured today is measured with a machine in accordance to SAE practice J332. This practice is widely used in the tire industry and describes tire testing equipment and procedures used to measure radial force variation of the tire. This practice stresses the importance of measuring force variation while the tire is under load and does not acknowledge unloaded runout measurement.

Many tire assembly plants have large production lines to measure loaded tire force variation. Tires, which do not meet uniformity specifications, may be brought into specification through additional manufacturer's procedures called force grinding. Force grinding is done to improve radial force variation by removing small areas of rubber from the sides and footprint of the tread. Force grinding may not improve (and in some cases may increase) the unloaded runout measurement.

A tire with large amounts of unloaded radial runout may be vibration free while a tire with low unloaded radial runout may vibrate. In many cases, tire manufacturers will forego unloaded runout measurement since this information is not as valuable as tire force variation when it comes to analyzing the causes of tire ride disturbances.

In the past, when trying to resolve tire/wheel vibration concerns, service facilities were unable to measure tire force variation. The size and expense of the factory machines were cost prohibitive. In order to compensate for this lack of field service technology, many automotive and tire manufacturers have published service limits for unloaded runout in the tire/wheel assembly.

A standard industry practice has been to measure unloaded runout in the center of the tire tread using a relatively inexpensive gauge. However, this measurement has little relationship to the actual amount of ride disturbance felt in the vehicle. For example, a set of springs may have an unloaded height measurement of equal length, yet when compressed may create different forces at the same compressed height.

Radial Force Vibration Placed in Perspective

In the past, most tire/wheel assembly vibration was considered balance related. Because of this, tire service professionals tend to relate tire/wheel vibration in terms of balance weight. Road Force will be best understood when related to the amount of balance weight required to cause a similar vibration in a wheel that rolls round under a load. In other words, "How much Road Force creates a similar vibration caused by tire imbalance?

Most tire service professionals and factory service manuals agree that residual static imbalance should not exceed .30 oz. on average size wheels and .60 oz. on larger light duty truck wheels.

Radial Force is determined by measuring loaded radial runout. On an average passenger car tire/wheel assembly, one thousandth of an inch (0.001") of loaded radial runout is equivalent to approximately one pound of Road Force.

Tests on a Chevrolet Lumina were performed using a chassis dynamometer in a Detroit test lab. The purpose of the test was to determine how much balance weight would be required to produce the same magnitude of force as a measured amount of loaded radial runout.

The tests were performed with the vehicle running at different speeds. The first test was at 50 miles per hour and the second test at 70 miles per hour.

At 50 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as 1.5 ounces (42 grams) of wheel imbalance at 50 mph. This is 5 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.

At 70 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as .75 ounces (21 grams) of wheel imbalance at 70 mph. This is 1 1/2 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.

What is Road Force Measurement™?


Road Force Measurement™

Road Force Measurement™ is new to the automotive service industry. This new measurement identifies tire and wheel uniformity, which has been measured for years in assembly plants and manufacturing facilities. Road Force can be used to solve uniformity related tire and wheel vibrations. Tire/wheel assembly uniformity can only be measured under load.

The load roller on the GSP9700 performs a computer simulated "road test". It measures the tire/wheel assembly to determine how "round" the assembly is when rolling under a load. If a tire were not exposed to the road surface, then balance would be more than sufficient. However, not all tires roll round under a load. For example, an egg-shaped tire/wheel assembly can be balanced about its axis, but an egg-shaped tire-wheel loaded against a surface would not give a smooth ride.

To understand the effects of radial force variation on vibration, a model of a tire can be used. The sidewall and footprint can be understood as a collection of springs between the rim and the tire contact patch. If the "springs" are not of uniform stiffness, a varied force is exerted on the axle and causes it to move up and down as the tire rotates and flexes. This movement creates a vibration in the vehicle unrelated to balance.

The GSP9700 load roller applies a force of up to 1400 pounds against the rotating tire/wheel assembly as it performs the Road Force Measurement™. The GSP9700 measures loaded radial runout of the tire/wheel assembly within 0.002". It plots data points as the component is rotated and calculates the radial first harmonic of the tire/wheel assembly and the first harmonic of wheel runout. The peak-to-peak value (Total Indicated Runout) and second, third and fourth harmonics of Road Force are also calculated and used for diagnostics. These measurements are all displayed on other screens.

The measurements of loaded radial runout are converted to Road Force Measurement in pounds, kilograms or Newtons using the following equation:

(Loaded Radial Runout) x (Tire Spring Rate) = Road Force Measurement Radial Force Variation

Radial force variation is an industrial measurement term describing the tire uniformity under load, measuring the variation (up and down) of the load acting on the vehicle spindle (SAE practice J332).

All tires have some non-uniformity in the sidewall and/or footprint due to variables in the manufacturing process. Tire uniformity measurement values can be affected by rim width, rim condition and many diverse tire mounting variables. Unlike balancing, there is often a small amount of RFV remaining in the tire/wheel assembly after ForceMatching and this is generally acceptable.

First Order Radial Force Variation


Radial Force Variation vs. Unloaded Runout

In the manufacturing community, tire uniformity is called radial force variation. The uniformity of most tires manufactured today is measured with a machine in accordance to SAE practice J332. This practice is widely used in the tire industry and describes tire testing equipment and procedures used to measure radial force variation of the tire. This practice stresses the importance of measuring force variation while the tire is under load and does not acknowledge unloaded runout measurement.

Many tire assembly plants have large production lines to measure loaded tire force variation. Tires, which do not meet uniformity specifications, may be brought into specification through additional manufacturer's procedures called force grinding. Force grinding is done to improve radial force variation by removing small areas of rubber from the sides and footprint of the tread. Force grinding may not improve (and in some cases may increase) the unloaded runout measurement.

A tire with large amounts of unloaded radial runout may be vibration free while a tire with low unloaded radial runout may vibrate. In many cases, tire manufacturers will forego unloaded runout measurement since this information is not as valuable as tire force variation when it comes to analyzing the causes of tire ride disturbances.

In the past, when trying to resolve tire/wheel vibration concerns, service facilities were unable to measure tire force variation. The size and expense of the factory machines were cost prohibitive. In order to compensate for this lack of field service technology, many automotive and tire manufacturers have published service limits for unloaded runout in the tire/wheel assembly.

A standard industry practice has been to measure unloaded runout in the center of the tire tread using a relatively inexpensive gauge. However, this measurement has little relationship to the actual amount of ride disturbance felt in the vehicle. For example, a set of springs may have an unloaded height measurement of equal length, yet when compressed may create different forces at the same compressed height.

Radial Force Vibration Placed in Perspective

In the past, most tire/wheel assembly vibration was considered balance related. Because of this, tire service professionals tend to relate tire/wheel vibration in terms of balance weight. Road Force will be best understood when related to the amount of balance weight required to cause a similar vibration in a wheel that rolls round under a load. In other words, "How much Road Force creates a similar vibration caused by tire imbalance?

Most tire service professionals and factory service manuals agree that residual static imbalance should not exceed .30 oz. on average size wheels and .60 oz. on larger light duty truck wheels.

Radial Force is determined by measuring loaded radial runout. On an average passenger car tire/wheel assembly, one thousandth of an inch (0.001") of loaded radial runout is equivalent to approximately one pound of Road Force.

Tests on a Chevrolet Lumina were performed using a chassis dynamometer in a Detroit test lab. The purpose of the test was to determine how much balance weight would be required to produce the same magnitude of force as a measured amount of loaded radial runout.

The tests were performed with the vehicle running at different speeds. The first test was at 50 miles per hour and the second test at 70 miles per hour.

At 50 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as 1.5 ounces (42 grams) of wheel imbalance at 50 mph. This is 5 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.

At 70 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as .75 ounces (21 grams) of wheel imbalance at 70 mph. This is 1 1/2 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.


What is Road Force Measurement™?

Road Force Measurement™

Road Force Measurement™ is new to the automotive service industry. This new measurement identifies tire and wheel uniformity, which has been measured for years in assembly plants and manufacturing facilities. Road Force can be used to solve uniformity related tire and wheel vibrations. Tire/wheel assembly uniformity can only be measured under load.

The load roller on the GSP9700 performs a computer simulated "road test". It measures the tire/wheel assembly to determine how "round" the assembly is when rolling under a load. If a tire were not exposed to the road surface, then balance would be more than sufficient. However, not all tires roll round under a load. For example, an egg-shaped tire/wheel assembly can be balanced about its axis, but an egg-shaped tire-wheel loaded against a surface would not give a smooth ride.

To understand the effects of radial force variation on vibration, a model of a tire can be used. The sidewall and footprint can be understood as a collection of springs between the rim and the tire contact patch. If the "springs" are not of uniform stiffness, a varied force is exerted on the axle and causes it to move up and down as the tire rotates and flexes. This movement creates a vibration in the vehicle unrelated to balance.

The GSP9700 load roller applies a force of up to 1400 pounds against the rotating tire/wheel assembly as it performs the Road Force Measurement™. The GSP9700 measures loaded radial runout of the tire/wheel assembly within 0.002". It plots data points as the component is rotated and calculates the radial first harmonic of the tire/wheel assembly and the first harmonic of wheel runout. The peak-to-peak value (Total Indicated Runout) and second, third and fourth harmonics of Road Force are also calculated and used for diagnostics. These measurements are all displayed on other screens.

The measurements of loaded radial runout are converted to Road Force Measurement in pounds, kilograms or Newtons using the following equation:

(Loaded Radial Runout) x (Tire Spring Rate) = Road Force Measurement Radial Force Variation

Radial force variation is an industrial measurement term describing the tire uniformity under load, measuring the variation (up and down) of the load acting on the vehicle spindle (SAE practice J332).

All tires have some non-uniformity in the sidewall and/or footprint due to variables in the manufacturing process. Tire uniformity measurement values can be affected by rim width, rim condition and many diverse tire mounting variables. Unlike balancing, there is often a small amount of RFV remaining in the tire/wheel assembly after ForceMatching and this is generally acceptable.

First Order Radial Force Variation


Radial Force Variation vs. Unloaded Runout

In the manufacturing community, tire uniformity is called radial force variation. The uniformity of most tires manufactured today is measured with a machine in accordance to SAE practice J332. This practice is widely used in the tire industry and describes tire testing equipment and procedures used to measure radial force variation of the tire. This practice stresses the importance of measuring force variation while the tire is under load and does not acknowledge unloaded runout measurement.

Many tire assembly plants have large production lines to measure loaded tire force variation. Tires, which do not meet uniformity specifications, may be brought into specification through additional manufacturer's procedures called force grinding. Force grinding is done to improve radial force variation by removing small areas of rubber from the sides and footprint of the tread. Force grinding may not improve (and in some cases may increase) the unloaded runout measurement.

A tire with large amounts of unloaded radial runout may be vibration free while a tire with low unloaded radial runout may vibrate. In many cases, tire manufacturers will forego unloaded runout measurement since this information is not as valuable as tire force variation when it comes to analyzing the causes of tire ride disturbances.

In the past, when trying to resolve tire/wheel vibration concerns, service facilities were unable to measure tire force variation. The size and expense of the factory machines were cost prohibitive. In order to compensate for this lack of field service technology, many automotive and tire manufacturers have published service limits for unloaded runout in the tire/wheel assembly.

A standard industry practice has been to measure unloaded runout in the center of the tire tread using a relatively inexpensive gauge. However, this measurement has little relationship to the actual amount of ride disturbance felt in the vehicle. For example, a set of springs may have an unloaded height measurement of equal length, yet when compressed may create different forces at the same compressed height.

Radial Force Vibration Placed in Perspective

In the past, most tire/wheel assembly vibration was considered balance related. Because of this, tire service professionals tend to relate tire/wheel vibration in terms of balance weight. Road Force will be best understood when related to the amount of balance weight required to cause a similar vibration in a wheel that rolls round under a load. In other words, "How much Road Force creates a similar vibration caused by tire imbalance?

Most tire service professionals and factory service manuals agree that residual static imbalance should not exceed .30 oz. on average size wheels and .60 oz. on larger light duty truck wheels.

Radial Force is determined by measuring loaded radial runout. On an average passenger car tire/wheel assembly, one thousandth of an inch (0.001") of loaded radial runout is equivalent to approximately one pound of Road Force.

Tests on a Chevrolet Lumina were performed using a chassis dynamometer in a Detroit test lab. The purpose of the test was to determine how much balance weight would be required to produce the same magnitude of force as a measured amount of loaded radial runout.

The tests were performed with the vehicle running at different speeds. The first test was at 50 miles per hour and the second test at 70 miles per hour.

At 50 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as 1.5 ounces (42 grams) of wheel imbalance at 50 mph. This is 5 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.

At 70 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as .75 ounces (21 grams) of wheel imbalance at 70 mph. This is 1 1/2 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.

First Order Radial Force Variation


Radial Force Variation vs. Unloaded Runout

In the manufacturing community, tire uniformity is called radial force variation. The uniformity of most tires manufactured today is measured with a machine in accordance to SAE practice J332. This practice is widely used in the tire industry and describes tire testing equipment and procedures used to measure radial force variation of the tire. This practice stresses the importance of measuring force variation while the tire is under load and does not acknowledge unloaded runout measurement.

Many tire assembly plants have large production lines to measure loaded tire force variation. Tires, which do not meet uniformity specifications, may be brought into specification through additional manufacturer's procedures called force grinding. Force grinding is done to improve radial force variation by removing small areas of rubber from the sides and footprint of the tread. Force grinding may not improve (and in some cases may increase) the unloaded runout measurement.

A tire with large amounts of unloaded radial runout may be vibration free while a tire with low unloaded radial runout may vibrate. In many cases, tire manufacturers will forego unloaded runout measurement since this information is not as valuable as tire force variation when it comes to analyzing the causes of tire ride disturbances.

In the past, when trying to resolve tire/wheel vibration concerns, service facilities were unable to measure tire force variation. The size and expense of the factory machines were cost prohibitive. In order to compensate for this lack of field service technology, many automotive and tire manufacturers have published service limits for unloaded runout in the tire/wheel assembly.

A standard industry practice has been to measure unloaded runout in the center of the tire tread using a relatively inexpensive gauge. However, this measurement has little relationship to the actual amount of ride disturbance felt in the vehicle. For example, a set of springs may have an unloaded height measurement of equal length, yet when compressed may create different forces at the same compressed height.

Radial Force Vibration Placed in Perspective

In the past, most tire/wheel assembly vibration was considered balance related. Because of this, tire service professionals tend to relate tire/wheel vibration in terms of balance weight. Road Force will be best understood when related to the amount of balance weight required to cause a similar vibration in a wheel that rolls round under a load. In other words, "How much Road Force creates a similar vibration caused by tire imbalance?

Most tire service professionals and factory service manuals agree that residual static imbalance should not exceed .30 oz. on average size wheels and .60 oz. on larger light duty truck wheels.

Radial Force is determined by measuring loaded radial runout. On an average passenger car tire/wheel assembly, one thousandth of an inch (0.001") of loaded radial runout is equivalent to approximately one pound of Road Force.

Tests on a Chevrolet Lumina were performed using a chassis dynamometer in a Detroit test lab. The purpose of the test was to determine how much balance weight would be required to produce the same magnitude of force as a measured amount of loaded radial runout.

The tests were performed with the vehicle running at different speeds. The first test was at 50 miles per hour and the second test at 70 miles per hour.

At 50 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as 1.5 ounces (42 grams) of wheel imbalance at 50 mph. This is 5 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.

At 70 MPH:
A measured .030" (about 30 pounds) of loaded radial runout caused the same amount of vibration as .75 ounces (21 grams) of wheel imbalance at 70 mph. This is 1 1/2 times greater than the .30 (1/4) ounce imbalance limit.
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post #6 of 29 (permalink) Old 09-19-2013, 12:46 PM
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What causes wheel vibration?


Vehicle noises and vibrations occur for many reasons. Some occur during the normal operation of the vehicle, as in the case of mechanical rotating parts. These include the engine, transmission, driveline, and tire/wheel assemblies.

Other noises and vibrations may occur due to abnormal conditions, found in tires, wheels, driveline, and worn parts.

Every vibration consists of three elements.

Source Component (excitation) - a component causing another object to vibrate.

Transfer Path - the object(s) that transfer the vibration (frequency).

Responding Component - the noticeable component that is vibrating.




The component creating the vibration may be a great distance from the component actually shaking or making noise.

The problem may be a damper working improperly or missing, which opens the transfer path to the responding component.

Another possibility is the deterioration of the responding component. Perhaps it becomes simpler to make it shake, rattle or make noise.
Vibration is divided into two categories:
Forced (vibrates when energy is applied) - An imbalanced tire vibrates when put in motion.

Forced Vibration
Free (continues to vibrate after outside energy stops) - A vehicle antenna or seatback continues to vibrate after the energy stops.

Free Vibration
Harmonic Vibrations

A vibration in a tire and rim assembly can be caused by:

ImbalanceChange in Sidewall Stiffness (Force Variation)Rim Bent/Out-of-RoundTire Out-of-RoundWheel to Axle Mounting Error*Brake Component Wear or Failure*Drive Train or Engine Component Wear or Failure*Vehicle Component Characteristics*Combination of Some or All Factors* Factors not detected by the GSP9700 Vibration Control System.
1st order vibrations occur once per revolution (cycle) as illustrated below.






2nd order vibrations
occur twice per revolution as illustrated below.




3rd order vibrations
occur three times per revolution as illustrated below.


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post #7 of 29 (permalink) Old 09-19-2013, 01:21 PM
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Thanks for posting that, it is very informative. You may have just posted the longest single post ever here, LOL.
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ChrisNTN (09-20-2013)
post #8 of 29 (permalink) Old 09-19-2013, 01:26 PM
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Quote:
I shake at 80 +
Its called Parkinsons. The ladies at the seniors home will love you. The walking vibrator...
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post #9 of 29 (permalink) Old 09-19-2013, 01:38 PM
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Same exact thing happens to me shake at 80+. Its not crazy, but its there. Ive had an alignment at the dealer and new tires mounted and balanced and its still there. I will try the roadforce thing.

One thing I have notice that if I'm going around a gradual curve in either direction on the highway the vibration goes away.

I will monitor this thread in case anyone has already found a solution.

This is so frustrating because when I drive my 12 year old subaru with 140k on the clock it is smooth as glass at 80 mph. LAME.

The Stable:

2009 Challenger DWB R/T 6SPD
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SOLD.

2019 Challenger Indigo Blue 392 SHAKER

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Cheers!
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post #10 of 29 (permalink) Old 09-19-2013, 02:06 PM Thread Starter
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Anyone notice only American cars do this
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