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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I hadn't started my '09 R/T automatic (32K mile semi garage queen) for about three weeks. Went to start it a day or two ago and the battery was too low, which often happens when I haven't started it in a while. I put it on an automatic battery charger which is what I do when this happens. Today I was going to head to a local cruise night and the car cranks well but doesn't fire at all.

I don't hear the fuel pump. I checked the fuses under the hood and 4,5,and 6 are dead on both sides. That's 4) EGR Solenoid and Alt Field, 5) Diesel PCM (!?) and 6) Injectors, Coil and SRV.

I haven't done any additional diagnostics and disconnected the battery for about a half hour to see if things would work when I reconnect it (didn't help). The car did have the timing chain recall done and sounds like it's cranking with normal compression.

The car was running perfectly before I parked it last (in its dry garage). Any ideas or guidelines to diagnose it? This is tougher to deal with than in the carburetor and ignition points days!
 

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I'm assuming you used a multimeter to check those fuses and that's what you mean by dead on both sides.

That implies that those fuses are not receiving any current upstream of them and those fuses not having current would definitely keep the car from firing.

Your battery has a good charge?

You said you cannot hear the fuel pump? Turn ignition to run but not cranking it, and see if you can hear the pump engage. If not, I would check the fuse box in the rear and check all those fuses for current (especially the fuel pump).

As a simple check, unhinge your front fuse box and verify that all plugins are secure in the back.

You could simply have a bad alternator or something far different but you need to start checking the above. Let us know.

Edit: also verify that the nut in the rear fuse box that provides power is securely tightened down
 

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Discussion Starter #3
To check the fuses I was using a 12V test light with a needle probe. And you are correct in assuming that when I said they are dead on both sides I meant there is no voltage going to them.

Battery is fairly new and fully charged, All connections are clean and tight. I checked the rear fuses, too, and there was one lower amperage one that had no power going to it. I had verified that all fuses and relays were inserted all the way in and gave each a good wiggle along with wire connectors.

<<You said you cannot hear the fuel pump? Turn ignition to run but not cranking it, and see if you can hear the pump engage.>> Correct. That's how I checked it and can't hear a thing.

Somewhere else I saw someone mention a fuel pump relay being a problem. Is that in the rear or front fuse box?
 

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The fuel pump fuse is in the back, like #6 in my car I believe. 20 amp yellow, may be different on a 09'.
Try pulling a "free" 20 amp yellow like #18 (cigar lighter) and placing it in the fuel pump slot and see if you can hear the pump. If not, your pump is most likely out.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Newold - I checked and you were right that #6 is the fuel pump fuse. I checked it and there are 12 volts on both sides - fuse it good and getting voltage.

I moved on to the fuel pump relay. I pulled it out and tested it and it was okay, also. The socket that supposed to be the 12V source for it (In the rear power distribution block) is also hot. On a whim, I jumped between that 12v socket and the one that feeds the fuel pump. I could hear a 'click' under the car but no pump hum. While doing this I noticed the (16 gauge) wire was getting a little warm so I put an 10 amp ammeter across those connectors and it pegged it, but I don't know how much current the pump should pull. Since it hasn't blown the fuse, I guess it's pulling somewhere between 10 and 20.

I don't have a scanner, but I have a Predator unit (and tune) and I remembered that it will pull up codes. So I connected it and it gave me a P0627 which is "Fuel Pump 'A' Control Circuit/Open.

From what I researched on P0627, this is kind of an ambiguous code. I'm getting an idea of what I think has gone bad, though. What do you guys think at this point?
 

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My next step would be to physically trace the wiring to the pump, checking for any insulation damage. Check voltage at the pump and verify the ground.

It really is an obscure code. You may have a bad pump or it may be a PCM issue if there is no short at the pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I just went out to the garage and disconnected the fuel line at the injector rail, put it in a soda bottle and cranked the engine. Not a drop of fuel came out.

Since the pump side of the relay is pulling current but not enough to blow the fuse, I'm thinking bad fuel pump. As Newold suggested, I'll pull the back seat tomorrow, check the wiring and see if it's getting voltage. If it is, it's fuel pump time I guess.
 

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Sounds like a plan, brother. Sorry about the bad news but at least it sounds like you got it figured out.

Like to hear back once you get her back up and running.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
3/4 tank. Most of which I have to drain to swap the fuel pump.

Here's another question: My 5.7 uses the same pump as a 3.5. The 6.1 is a different number and I assume larger capacity (for a bit more money). Any reason to use a 6.1 pump? The car was running well as it was.
 

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3/4 tank. Most of which I have to drain to swap the fuel pump.

Here's another question: My 5.7 uses the same pump as a 3.5. The 6.1 is a different number and I assume larger capacity (for a bit more money). Any reason to use a 6.1 pump? The car was running well as it was.
You do not need to drain the tank to do a fuel pump as it is located under the back seat on the top of the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It would be a lot easier job if I didn't have to drain the tank. Most of the service procedures I looked at said to drain it down to 1/4, though. Any reason to do that?
 

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Probably just as a safety precaution. If you are at 3/4 tank, I personally wouldn't worry about draining any of it but that's just me.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Did some more checking today. I took the back seat bottom out (easier than I though it would be) and got to the top of the tank. I took the connector off and checked it with a test light. One of the bigger wires, which I suppose runs the pump and not the sender, goes hot for about 3-4 seconds after the 'Start' button is pushed twice to 'run'. I'm supposing this is correct but I don't remember why.

With the connector on the pump, I hear a soft click when the power goes to it but no whir or hum and I feel no vibration with my hand on top of it.

What do you guys think?
 

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Bad pump is my verdict.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yeah, I finally broke down and ordered an Airtex pump from Rock Auto for about $100. I could get a Spectra from my local parts store for $135 but as the R/T isn't my daily driver I can wait a few days. Plus I like the Airtex name better. In the meantime I can cobble together a tool to twist off that big lock ring.

I'll let you guys know if this fixes it and if anything looks physically wrong with the original pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Hey! I got the new fuel pump a few days ago. I welded up a three prong tool to get that big lock-ring off that roughly resembles one of these: https://www.amazon.com/OTC-6599-Uni...81959&sr=8-1&keywords=chrysler+fuel+pump+tool but much uglier because I'm out of practice with my welding. Keep in mind that you need a tool with three slotted ends like that one has. Most of the similar tools are for cars with plastic lock-rings and have forked ends.

I tried to siphon my tank down some as it was just under 3/4. I had no luck as I couldn't get a tube to get under the level of the gas in the tank. Hitting the fuel pump, maybe? I tried a 1" OD hose and a 1/2" OD hose and then gave up.

I got the seat bottom out a lot easier than I though I would. The R/T is in the right side of my 2-car garage so I couldn't open the right door very far and '09's don't have driver's seats that fold forward. But using the power controls, I could get the left seat far enough forward to get the seat bottom (and me) in and out easily.

The cover and connector came off easily but that lock ring is a #@&$! My ugly but sturdy tool (1/8" plate with 3/16" fingers) did the job but that thing came off with a bang! The pump was then stuck against the O-ring so I carefully pried it up in case gas was going to overflow. It turns out that just under 3/4 tank is the sweet spot. Much more and I would have had a gas spill. The fuel was less than an inch from the fuel pump hole.

I removed the 'hat', two electrical connectors and three fuel lines. The outlet hose to the engine has two tabs to be pushed in and it pops off. The other two hoses are to the right side tank. They were held in by clips and didn't seem to have any pressure tight connection (unless I missed something - hope not). All the hoses and wires have to be pushed down in the tank to get the pump out. I had a small bucket right there to put the old pump in and managed not to make a mess.

Then I could see two interesting things: The plastic filter at the bottom of the pump was completely free of debris and by using my trouble light to look at the tank bottom, I could see that it was completely clean, too. So whatever caused the problem apparently wasn't crap in the tank. I walked the pump out to the driveway and discovered that if you turn it upside-down, about a pint of fuel dumps out. D'oh!

The new pump installed in the reverse of removal. I still don't understand the two tubes that connect to the right tank as they make no real connection but just point at some openings in the pump when they are clipped in.

Then it was time to put that lock ring back on again. I put some grease on the tabs that lock into the tank to ease installation. Though I could get the ring started with my fingers, it was actually harder to tighten than it was to remove, probably because of the new, uncompressed O-ring. I had to use a 24" breaker bar and really heave on it and got another BANG! I figured either it went into position or I broke the tool. Turns out that it popped into position. If I have to do it again, I'll grease the bottom of the ring, too

Then it was just plugging in the pump from the outside and putting the plastic cover back in the floor. I push the start button twice and heard a nice steady whir from behind the seat. I hit start and the Hemi fired right up. The gas gauge read what it should. Success!

I haven't driven it yet but will let you guys know if there are any further problems. Except for that stubborn lock ring and having to reach into the gasoline a few times, it wasn't too bad of a job.

What was wrong with the old pump? I have not idea. Either electrical failure or perhaps a bearing or bushing seized. Odd that it would do it while the car was parking unused in the garage for about three weeks. Maybe there are rubber seals on the pump shaft that swelled and jammed the shaft? The pump itself is a sealed metal unit so if I do an autopsy it will be with a Sawzall.
 

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Sounds like you got it figured out. Glad you got it back together!
 

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