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I've just had the second oil change on my car at the 10 month mark. I did the first one at 4 months, and 2K miles and the second six months later at 5K. My car gets hot enough about once a week, at least, to cook out any water, and the only place I ever saw any evidence of water on my old car was the white goop I used to see under the oil filler every time I looked at it. The 392 seems to run hotter than my 5.7 so I would imagine that water remaining is less of an issue even though I drive a lot less now.
 

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I change mine two weeks or so before putting her away for the winter, so there is fresh oil in the pan. Is this a good strategy or should I leave it dirty for the winter and go fresh first thing in the spring. To me it is sorta like brushing your teeth before bed and waking up fresh. Would love to hear what others do.
 

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I change mine two weeks or so before putting her away for the winter, so there is fresh oil in the pan.
I prefer parking it for the winter with fresh oil, and I'm sure the engine does, too. With fresh I mean that there's about 400 feet worth of driving on the oil.

The downside is that technically I should dump that fresh oil in the spring. Maybe the ideal way is to drain the oil in the fall, but not put new oil in until spring.
Then it becomes a 6-month long oil change, which should satisfy the dumb 6-month rule.
 

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Would there be any impact on any type of seals leaving the car sit without any oil for 6 months? I guess not since the oil would just be sitting at the bottom of the oil pan anyway, right?
 

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Modern oils cling and hang around for a long time. Besides, like you say, the oil would be at the bottom of the pan either way.

I'll ask my friend/FCA contact/dealer what his thoughts on a "prolonged oil change" are. He would have access to the exact wording in the 6-month rule.
I'd think that legally it would work, making it a once a year change while still obeying the rule.
 

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Modern oils cling and hang around for a long time. Besides, like you say, the oil would be at the bottom of the pan either way.

I'll ask my friend/FCA contact/dealer what his thoughts on a "prolonged oil change" are. He would have access to the exact wording in the 6-month rule.
I'd think that legally it would work, making it a once a year change while still obeying the rule.
Best of luck with this idea. Got a feeling that you'll be disappointed.

Can't ever see FCA going along with this thought, and putting it into writing that it's OK.
 

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Best of luck with this idea. Got a feeling that you'll be disappointed.
Maybe I will, but then again, maybe I won't. It would largely depend on how they have worded the 6-month rule.

And don't forget that they have set a precedent by approving of having the rule suspended until the vehicle is sold.
Someone with a dealer plate would therefore only be bound by the 6,000-mile interval.

To me, either the oil goes bad in six months, or it doesn't.
 

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Best of luck with this idea. Got a feeling that you'll be disappointed.
Maybe I will, but then again, maybe I won't. It would largely depend on how they have worded the 6-month rule.

And don't forget that they have set a precedent by approving of having the rule suspended until the vehicle is sold.
Someone with a dealer plate would therefore only be bound by the 6,000-mile interval.

To me, either the oil goes bad in six months, or it doesn't.
Cars on the lot before a sale have oil in the engine.

FCA has zero control of what can happen to an engine with no oil, and in a customers garage....like an accidental "dry start" by someone.

Again, good luck, but don't hold your breath.
 

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Cars on the lot before a sale have oil in the engine.

FCA has zero control of what can happen to an engine with no oil, and in a customers garage....like an accidental "dry start" by someone.

Again, good luck, but don't hold your breath.
Yes, I'm fully aware of the fact that practically all cars have oil in them, at almost all times.
I also wasn't advocating that everybody, dealers included, would take six months to complete an oil change.

If there was a requirement that said the engine has to have oil in it at all times, oil changes as we know them couldn't happen. It'd have to be more of a flush.

Could an engine accidentally be started after six months without oil in it? Sure. Have people accidentally started an engine during a regular oil change, before putting new oil in? I would imagine that it has happened.
So whether the engine has sat with an empty pan for five minutes or six months, the result would pretty much be the same.

There is, unfortunately, one thing that will forever break and destroy things, because you just can't fix stupid.
Stupid does seem to keep the lawyers occupied, though.
 

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Modern oils cling and hang around for a long time. Besides, like you say, the oil would be at the bottom of the pan either way. I'll ask my friend/FCA contact/dealer what his thoughts on a "prolonged oil change" are. He would have access to the exact wording in the 6-month rule.
I'd think that legally it would work, making it a once a year change while still obeying the rule.
definitely



Let us know how that Q&A turns out there! The service managers that I contacted concerning this issue apparently were clueless about it, would definitely want it in writing for sure. Was at the dealer to pick up a SRT filter the other day and found it interesting that one of the parts guys behind the counter, had no idea what I was talking about. After being informed by parts guy #2, he laughed and told me that he had been working parts for over three years and this was the first time that he had heard about them, said he was going to start recommending them to his customers, from here on out. Looks like they may have a hard time keeping them in stock if he does....





HOT ROD ON
 

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Let us know how that Q&A turns out there! The service managers that I contacted concerning this issue apparently were clueless about it, would definitely want it in writing for sure.

HOT ROD ON
For all practical purposes it's probably a non-issue for me. When getting a diesel Ram a couple of years ago, I couldn't help but notice that it has a 15,000-mile/6-month rule for its oil changes.

Well, there's no way I'd let the oil go that far before the first change, so it got it at under 2,000 miles. I also knew that I wouldn't change it every six months, just because, and asked my friend/FCA contact/dealer about it.
Maybe because he knows that I'm anal about vehicle maintenance he said not to worry, he'd take care of things should something happen.

At this point, by the rules, that pickup should've had it's fourth change by now, despite only having a bit over 8,000 miles on it. It has had two.
Will it die a horrible premature death because of it? Probably not. Would it have benefited the engine in any way to have changed the oil twice as many times? Most likely not.

But I'm curious now to find out what FCA's official verbiage is. Have they put a limit on how long an oil change can take?
I also can't help but wonder how the oil in a Porsche Turbo S can live both longer and go farther without going bad.

Guess I should be glad there's no rule saying I have to wash my car every six months, too.
 

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I contacted FCA through their online chat and they said changing your own oil wouldn’t void any warranty. As long as I kept receipts and changed it every 6 months that is all I need to do.
All,

I watched the video on YouTube that DragCity uplinked and it looks legit so this is a for real requirement.

Many of you are non-plussed about the six month absolute requirement to have the oil and filter changed. Despite all the interest and helpful posts about DIY, and documenting the DIY, and other oils...NONE of that is going to be a win in court. How many of us are prepared mentally, emotionally, or financially to sue FCA to prove compliance? Not many.

Clearly this memo is a legal shot across the bow by FCA that they fully intend to deny, rather than honor, hemi engine warranties. Please be clear on this - else why issue this memo? Change the oil more frequently as you wish, but we would all be idiots to not have a recorded oil and filter change by a FCA dealership prior to either every 6,000 miles or every 6 months. This is our reality. So, I'll sure as hell do it at the dealership to protect my expensive engine.

Why the memo? Maybe FCA is finding out their engines have one, or more, design flaws and this is a desperate effort to screw the tardy among us. Maybe they are realizing that more owners are flogging their cars. Keep in mind that competing with these cars voids our warranty. But maybe the outlaws among owners are flogging their cars illegally according to the government, but legally according to the warranty because it's just driving with "spirit". Or legally within speed limits but with enough spirit to break the engines?

I'm fine with 6,000 miles and I'm fine with going to the dealerships and paying $130 for new oil and a filter. What sticks in my craw is the 6 month requirement. I'm an evidence-based, scientific-minded person. What is it about this Pennzoil, which is synthesized from natural gas not oil pumped from the ground, that requires it to be changed every 6 months or it will so likely lead to engine damage FCA won't warranty? Keep in mind within 6,000 miles of accrued mileage. As someone said, "There is no expiration date on the bottle". So, is it only after the oil is heated within the hemi engine (one time?) that leads to its failure after 6 months? I cry foul on this being an actual oil-related need, but if anyone has information to the contrary to support the time limit (FCA customer service reps, are you listening?) please post it.

I live in Northern Kentucky and my hemi-equipped Challenger is not my daily driver. To avoid driving on salted roads I will store it in a garage that never gets colder than 40 F from December 1 until March 31 - and have my insurance company reduce premiums for those months which is nice (USAA - and it will still be covered if destroyed somehow in the garage). Will I start it and let it throughly warm up? Yes, I plan to at least once a month. To comply with this 6 month absolute requirement I will have to get the oil changed in November - judging to avoid the first snow and salted roads - and again in April - that's five months. I sure hope I don't get sick, or have a job-related travel away from home, or for any other reason don't abide by this November and April requirement. How about guys who live in Minnesota? I guess they'll be driving their cars on salted roads to comply.

Unless someone can prove to me that after six months in the engine - and from say 10 to 5,999 miles of driving - this Pennzoil stuff degrades so badly a warranty must be voided I must conclude this is just a money-making marketing ploy on two fronts. One, get owners into the dealership for changes, and two, deep six the owners who fail to comply and have the misfortune to need warranty work. And you know what? Either reason is unethical.

There is one possible reason why 6 months might be a reasonable requirement that I can think of. I used to own an airplane. If those Lycoming engines sat for months and were never exercised - warmed up for an hour or so of flight time - the story was that the camshafts might corrode for lack of oil getting circulated (and if not warmed up then water would pollute the oil - it was supposed to get hot enough to evaporate out of the crankcase). Perhaps FCA is concerned that the collectors, and maybe even guys like me who will store over the winter, won't exercise their engines property and things inside the engine will suffer?

FCA? Over to you...

Best,

Finface
 

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I prefer parking it for the winter with fresh oil, and I'm sure the engine does, too. With fresh I mean that there's about 400 feet worth of driving on the oil.

The downside is that technically I should dump that fresh oil in the spring. Maybe the ideal way is to drain the oil in the fall, but not put new oil in until spring.
Then it becomes a 6-month long oil change, which should satisfy the dumb 6-month rule.
An oil change is drain old oil and filter, fill with new oil and filter. Your plan is taking 6 months to DO an oil change. But you'll have not done it within 6 months. Just spend the $85 until your warranty is over :grin2:

A Guy
 

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An oil change is drain old oil and filter, fill with new oil and filter. Your plan is taking 6 months to DO an oil change. But you'll have not done it within 6 months. Just spend the $85 until your warranty is over :grin2:

A Guy
Easy for you to say, A Guy. With four vehicles that "require" an oil change every six months, no matter what the mileage, it starts adding up.
Then I have several others that need their oil changed on more intelligent schedules (hours and/or time). Plus a few that get a change every 10 years, or so, whether they need it or not.

No wonder I don't have much time to actually drive my Challenger.

Anyway, I like the idea of starting with fresh oil in April, then drain the oil in October. That satisfies the 6-month rule, right?
Next April I fill it back up, having spent six months to perform the change. Unless there's a stipulated time frame for completing an oil change, that should stop the clock and get me in the clear.

After all, recalled water pumps for Ram diesel pickups weren't available from dealers for about six months, so the clock can be stopped when it's suitable.
 

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If you change the oil, then 6 months later change it again, yes. If you change it in April, and only drain it in October, you haven't changed the oil, only drained it. Just sayin'. There is a stipulated time frame to do a complete oil change, drain and fill...6 months. If you change it in April, then only finish filling it the next April, that is 12 months. You'd need to have completed an oil change within 6 months.

A Guy
 

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Easy for you to say, A Guy. With four vehicles that "require" an oil change every six months, no matter what the mileage, it starts adding up.
Then I have several others that need their oil changed on more intelligent schedules (hours and/or time). Plus a few that get a change every 10 years, or so, whether they need it or not.

No wonder I don't have much time to actually drive my Challenger.

Anyway, I like the idea of starting with fresh oil in April, then drain the oil in October. That satisfies the 6-month rule, right?
Next April I fill it back up, having spent six months to perform the change. Unless there's a stipulated time frame for completing an oil change, that should stop the clock and get me in the clear.

After all, recalled water pumps for Ram diesel pickups weren't available from dealers for about six months, so the clock can be stopped when it's suitable.


:grin2:
 

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OK, here's what I'll say...do it your way. You'll be unlikely to have an engine related failure attributable to the oil change interval, but if you do, see if your way works >:)

A Guy
 

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As long as you have some kind of maintenance log stating that you did the oil changes and receipts showing that you bought the correct oil and filter at the appropriate time to line up with the 6-month rule you would be good and they would accept that for a warranty claim regardless of whether you actually changed the oil or not. There's simply no logical reason why an oil change with low mileage driven is good for 12 months on an SXT or R/T but only 6 months on an SRT or 392, this 6-month number assumes racing or other hard driving and not normal street use so it's an unreasonable requirement imho.


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Yes, but he'd still need to purchase oil every 6 months...unless he has a way to get receipts only ;)

A Guy
 
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