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So I wonder if changing early is overkill?
what does factory use? I am thimking of running penzoil platinum synthetic
1250 miles 5 weeks to the day
 

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So I wonder if changing early is overkill?
what does factory use? I am thimking of running penzoil platinum synthetic
1250 miles 5 weeks to the day
Engine builders typically run a new engine in on the Dyno and then change the oil and filter. Then they will usually pull another early oil change 500-1000 miles. This is done by people that care about their engines and want it to last and perform well. Also people used to keep their cars for an average of 15-20 years!

Today...people change cars like underwear. Leases and today's "throw away" lifestyle has led to much less maintenance than previously performed. Myself....I am old school and I keep my vehicles for a long time. On my Scat....the first change was at 750 miles. Second was at 2,000. I change mine every 5K or sometimes sooner. I use the factory fill recommended Ultra Platinum 0-40. Enjoy your new ride....Gene :)
 

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It's overkill. No benefit to change the oil early except cost. The car will not blow up if you don't change early and will last a long time.
 

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So I wonder if changing early is overkill?
what does factory use? I am thimking of running penzoil platinum synthetic
1250 miles 5 weeks to the day
On cars I purchase new, I change the oil between 1,000 and 1,500 miles just in case there are any metal particles from the break-in period. Yes, I know it's probably overkill but old habits die hard.

Then I follow the onboard oil life monitor for future oil changes ---- 6,000 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first.

For the 392 .... the engine left the factory with Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Full Synthetic 0W-40.
 

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So I wonder if changing early is overkill?
what does factory use? I am thimking of running penzoil platinum synthetic
1250 miles 5 weeks to the day
There are those that think an early oil change is overkill. And a number of engines don't receive this and appear to be just "fine".

But I was taught a new engine should get its oil changed early and this is what I do. And unless forbidden by the owners manual I recommend new car owners do the same.

For example for my new Hellcat I had the oil changed at around 500 miles, then again at 2K miles (end of "break in") and at 5K miles, then every 5K miles (or like Dodge calls for every 6 months) thereafter.

New engines shed a lot of trash mostly fine metal particles that are dislodged by the friction of the oil.

(As a machinist -- in a previous career -- I had a chance to observe first hand -- using my hand -- how much fine metal particles a freshly machined surface could shed. Cast iron was particularly bad but even aluminum and magnesium shed particles too. Really everything from iron to steel, aluminum, magnesium, copper, bronze, brass, rubber (used to grind rubber rolls used in a large printing press), even glass would leave particles of material on my hand.)

While the filter catches this stuff if there is a filter bypass valve whenever this opens unfiltered oil flows from the filter to the engine. All that nasty stuff that was in the filter housing -- not all gets trapped in the filter folds -- then flows to the engine.

Besides shedding particulate matter a new engine is very good (or bad) about contaminating the engine oil. This is normal but one doesn't have to live with it. Changing the oil of course removes the contaminated oil and replaces it with fresh oil.

When I buy a car I do with the intention at least of keeping it forever. Because of this I want to do what I can that is reasonable to help ensure a long and trouble free service life. An early oil/filter service or 2 is part of what I do. Adhering to the automaker's break in guidelines is another.

As for the oil to use my advice is to use what the factory calls for. For my Hellcat engine that is Pennzoil 0w-40 Ultra Platinum Full Synthetic, which is what the engine came with from the factory. IIRC there are now 2 other oils that are also recognized by Dodge as suitable alternatives but I don't not recall the names and the local Dodge dealers only stock the Pennzoil oil any how.
 

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First change was 1400 miles since it had 5 years on it.

bought car in 2019 with factory oil filter on it due to the car only had 176 miles on in 2019 !!!!
 

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I can’t find Pennzoil in the UK. I was planning to run Mobil 1 FS 0W-40 Full Synthetic.
I’m guessing the 392 will be ok with that, but what with MDS I wanted to check.
 

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I can’t find Pennzoil in the UK. I was planning to run Mobil 1 FS 0W-40 Full Synthetic.
I’m guessing the 392 will be ok with that, but what with MDS I wanted to check.
Being in the UK is a problem.

While I used Mobil 1 0w-40 (and for the last few years Mobil 1 5w-50) oil in my Boxster and Porsche Turbo -- both oils being on the Porsche approved oils list -- and used 0w-40 oil in my 2006 GTO and my 2002 VW Golf TDi (the oil being ok to use in both of these engines) and drove those cars a combine 667K miles with nary an engine problem and really no signs of any engine wear I have to stress Mobil 1 0w-40 oil is not sanctioned for use in your car's engine.

My advice to you before you go over to the dark side is see if you can buy -- via mail order -- the oil you should use.

Almost certainly you will need other things that are not readily available where you are. I'm thinking besides the oil there is the oil filter, engine and cabin air filters, fuel filter, plugs and a serpentine belt. If you keep the car long enough there's a water pump, T-stat, and of course the correct antifreeze. Even if the water pump stays healthy a coolant drain and refill every 4 years really helps prolong the life of the water pump and hoses and the rest of the cooling system components.

Maybe you want the proper brake fluid and transmission/diff fluid, too.

Maybe you run a trial and order the oil and filter just to see how this works for you so you can then have some feeling for what you are facing when it comes time to service the other things.

Bottom like is my advice is you should strive to use the factory recommended fluids if at all possible.
 

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I can’t find Pennzoil in the UK. I was planning to run Mobil 1 FS 0W-40 Full Synthetic.
I’m guessing the 392 will be ok with that, but what with MDS I wanted to check.
The big reason that SRT hired Shell (makes Pennzoil) to invent an oil for the 392 is cleanliness. The 392 will NOT tolerate much detonation as this will cause piston failure. Too much timing from a bad tune, or carbon build up causing too much compression will do it. Pennzoil Ultra, Shell Helix, and Shell Rotella T-6 are all GTL (Natural Gas to Liquid) base stock oil. They are they only ones in the world. Others will lubricate, but will NOT provide the cleanliness the 392 DEMANDS for a healthy life. Shell Helix would be my next choice then Rotella. Rotella is a combo diesel / gas oil that contains a ZDDP and phosphurus package. This is a better lubricant.....but the cats will suffer about 25-30K in life expectancy.
 
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I would say there is not really such thing as "too early" to get the intitial run in oil & filter out. I have also shot for between 1000 & 1500 miles for initial change.
 

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Being in the UK is a problem.

While I used Mobil 1 0w-40 (and for the last few years Mobil 1 5w-50) oil in my Boxster and Porsche Turbo -- both oils being on the Porsche approved oils list -- and used 0w-40 oil in my 2006 GTO and my 2002 VW Golf TDi (the oil being ok to use in both of these engines) and drove those cars a combine 667K miles with nary an engine problem and really no signs of any engine wear I have to stress Mobil 1 0w-40 oil is not sanctioned for use in your car's engine.

My advice to you before you go over to the dark side is see if you can buy -- via mail order -- the oil you should use.

Almost certainly you will need other things that are not readily available where you are. I'm thinking besides the oil there is the oil filter, engine and cabin air filters, fuel filter, plugs and a serpentine belt. If you keep the car long enough there's a water pump, T-stat, and of course the correct antifreeze. Even if the water pump stays healthy a coolant drain and refill every 4 years really helps prolong the life of the water pump and hoses and the rest of the cooling system components.

Maybe you want the proper brake fluid and transmission/diff fluid, too.

Maybe you run a trial and order the oil and filter just to see how this works for you so you can then have some feeling for what you are facing when it comes time to service the other things.

Bottom like is my advice is you should strive to use the factory recommended fluids if at all possible.
Thank you. I have a Mopar filter on the shelf ready to go and most service items are available to me within a few days.
I have had difficulty importing anything liquid before but will see what I can do.
I would prefer to use the OEM spec oil.
 

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The big reason that SRT hired Shell (makes Pennzoil) to invent an oil for the 392 is cleanliness. The 392 will NOT tolerate much detonation as this will cause piston failure. Too much timing from a bad tune, or carbon build up causing too much compression will do it. Pennzoil Ultra, Shell Helix, and Shell Rotella T-6 are all GTL (Natural Gas to Liquid) base stock oil. They are they only ones in the world. Others will lubricate, but will NOT provide the cleanliness the 392 DEMANDS for a healthy life. Shell Helix would be my next choice then Rotella. Rotella is a combo diesel / gas oil that contains a ZDDP and phosphurus package. This is a better lubricant.....but the cats will suffer about 25-30K in life expectancy.
I have found Shell Helix, but not in 0w40.
0w30 is the closest I have found.
 

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Not cheap



A Guy
Saw those. All shipping from outside the UK.
Thanks though
 

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The big reason that SRT hired Shell (makes Pennzoil) to invent an oil for the 392 is cleanliness. The 392 will NOT tolerate much detonation as this will cause piston failure. Too much timing from a bad tune, or carbon build up causing too much compression will do it. Pennzoil Ultra, Shell Helix, and Shell Rotella T-6 are all GTL (Natural Gas to Liquid) base stock oil. They are they only ones in the world. Others will lubricate, but will NOT provide the cleanliness the 392 DEMANDS for a healthy life. Shell Helix would be my next choice then Rotella. Rotella is a combo diesel / gas oil that contains a ZDDP and phosphurus package. This is a better lubricant.....but the cats will suffer about 25-30K in life expectancy.
Oh God not Rotella again.. Some years ago the Porsche Turbo crowd got all hot on that oil. Some went to it to address "tick". Turns out the oil quieted the ticking (probably not more than if the owner would have just changed the oil and used the recommended oil: 0w-40) but in just a couple of thousand miles the tick was back.

Besides the oil is (last time I was able to check on this) made up of up to 25% mineral oil.

Rotella is a diesel oil. Diesel engines do not have the bearing speed, elevated combustion temperatures gasoline engines have. If the oil should be used at all -- and it was NOT approved for use in my VW TDi or in Porsche diesel engines FWIW -- it should only be used in a diesel engine.
 

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Oh God not Rotella again.. Some years ago the Porsche Turbo crowd got all hot on that oil. Some went to it to address "tick". Turns out the oil quieted the ticking (probably not more than if the owner would have just changed the oil and used the recommended oil: 0w-40) but in just a couple of thousand miles the tick was back.

Besides the oil is (last time I was able to check on this) made up of up to 25% mineral oil.

Rotella is a diesel oil. Diesel engines do not have the bearing speed, elevated combustion temperatures gasoline engines have. If the oil should be used at all -- and it was NOT approved for use in my VW TDi or in Porsche diesel engines FWIW -- it should only be used in a diesel engine.
Oh God....You might want to do some rechecking - https://www.shell-livedocs.com/data/published/en-US/f43921f8-8e28-49d7-9022-09d19fffe655.pdf

EXCERPT: Shell ROTELLA® T6 5W-40 heavy duty engine oil with Triple Protection Plustechnology is formulated with Shell PurePlus Technology base oils. Shell PurePlus Technology is the patented process at Pearl GTL (Gas to Liquid) plant in Qatar which converts natural gas into a clear base oil, the main component of engine oils.

Triple Protection Plus Triple Protection Plus is the unique combination of Triple Protection® and Shell PurePlus Technology. It’s inside every bottle of Shell ROTELLA® T6 Full Synthetic and Shell ROTELLA® T5 Synthetic Blend Technology. Shell PurePlus Technology produces a 99.5% pure base oil for optimum protection, increased fuel effi ciency and reduced maintenance costs. Expect more products with Triple Protection Plus technology to be licensed and released soon*.

Until mid 2017....Rotella T6 was also rated to API SM. (gas rated) Shell relented because the EPA lowered the Zinc/ Phosphorus content down to 800 ppm. They are currently at 1200 /1100. Shell did not want to lower the product content, so they pulled the designation. This is regarding CATALYTIC CONVERTERS which some claim is harmful to the cats and can cost 25-30K off the life of them.

T6 would STILL be gas rated if not for the EPA! NOT because of anything else.....including bearing speed! The Motorcycle world went to Rotella years ago and their bearing speeds are FAR faster than any German car you have ever owned Rockster.....present or past.

So we make a decision....what is more important...the Motor or the Cats? Screw the cats! They are FAR cheaper than a motor any day.....including a Boxter, Miata, 911, VW or anything else.

Just In case you missed it......the base oil is 99.5 % PURE GTL. (Natural Gas to Liquid)

Bearing speed does not dictate oil. A superior additive package and base oil do. On 392 Hemi's (not other motors Rockster) piston cleanliness is priority one to the life of them. If it's not a GTL oil....it's on borrowed time.
 
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I changed mine at 5,000 miles.
 

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Oh God....You might want to do some rechecking - https://www.shell-livedocs.com/data/published/en-US/f43921f8-8e28-49d7-9022-09d19fffe655.pdf

EXCERPT: Shell ROTELLA® T6 5W-40 heavy duty engine oil with Triple Protection Plustechnology is formulated with Shell PurePlus Technology base oils. Shell PurePlus Technology is the patented process at Pearl GTL (Gas to Liquid) plant in Qatar which converts natural gas into a clear base oil, the main component of engine oils.

Triple Protection Plus Triple Protection Plus is the unique combination of Triple Protection® and Shell PurePlus Technology. It’s inside every bottle of Shell ROTELLA® T6 Full Synthetic and Shell ROTELLA® T5 Synthetic Blend Technology. Shell PurePlus Technology produces a 99.5% pure base oil for optimum protection, increased fuel effi ciency and reduced maintenance costs. Expect more products with Triple Protection Plus technology to be licensed and released soon*.

Until mid 2017....Rotella T6 was also rated to API SM. (gas rated) Shell relented because the EPA lowered the Zinc/ Phosphorus content down to 800 ppm. They are currently at 1200 /1100. Shell did not want to lower the product content, so they pulled the designation. This is regarding CATALYTIC CONVERTERS which some claim is harmful to the cats and can cost 25-30K off the life of them.

T6 would STILL be gas rated if not for the EPA! NOT because of anything else.....including bearing speed! The Motorcycle world went to Rotella years ago and their bearing speeds are FAR faster than any German car you have ever owned Rockster.....present or past.

So we make a decision....what is more important...the Motor or the Cats? Screw the cats! They are FAR cheaper than a motor any day.....including a Boxter, Miata, 911, VW or anything else.

Just In case you missed it......the base oil is 99.5 % PURE GTL. (Natural Gas to Liquid)

Bearing speed does not dictate oil. A superior additive package and base oil do. On 392 Hemi's (not other motors Rockster) piston cleanliness is priority one to the life of them. If it's not a GTL oil....it's on borrowed time.
Pure Plus is the same technology/gas to oil process that is used to produce Pennzoil Ultra Platinum oils.

Bearing speed plays a role in oil selection. A higher bearing speed means more sheer and more heat the oil is subjected too. This may account for the fact it appears a good number of motorcycle makers offer their own oil.

Honda apparently has its own oil for its motorcycle engines.

Suzuki ditto.

H-D ditto.

And Kawasaki.

Apparently if there has been any movement to Rotella for motorcycles it hasn't been driven by the motorcycle makers. Like was the case with Porsche engine the move to using Rotella was driven by people willing to jump over an excellent oil (Mobil 1 0w-40) and run Rotella instead because the excellent oil was approved by Porsche which of course caused some owners to suspect the oil.

One web site offers up 10 best motorcycle oils and Rotella is at the top of the list. But it is cited as being less likely to poison the exhaust because of its low ash content. Fails to consider the additives you point out are harmful to exhaust systems, at least those with a converter. This kind of reasoning calls into questioning just how the oil was selected.

Another site offers a list of the best synthetic motor oils. I note while Rotella T6 is listed it is listed as a Group III oil. Pennzoil Ultra Platinum is listed as a Group V oil. Rotella oil is touted as specifically made for heavy-duty engines. Packed with additives tailored to extend the life of DPF and EGR systems. I'm sure the SRT engines do not have DPF. Not even sure if they do EGR.

Where's the MSDS which (often but not always) details what the actual contents of the oil is? The MSDS used to be pretty informative but more and more all the components of the oil were labeled proprietary and not listed. As long as the safety data was correct this was sufficient.

I haven't looked at Rotella in a while. Let me get up to speed...

Pennzoil Ultra Platinum 0w-40 (Rotella T6)
Flash point: 224C (233C)
Pour Point: -51C (-51C)
Kinematic Viscosity @40C: 74.9 (90)
Kinematic Viscosity @100C: 13.7 (14.9)
Viscosity Index: 189 (Not Available)
Total Base Number: Not Available (10.2)
CCS Viscosity @-35C: 5850 (6300 @-30C)
Ash content: Not Available (1.0%)

Have to admit the new Rotella appears to be a step up from the old.

Still a Group III oil.

Still made for heavy-duty slow spinning diesel engines.

Still not approved for use by FCA/Dodge in its SRT engines or any other engines not counting the possibility it is approved for one of the diesel engines Dodge uses.

So for me meh. Not interested in Rotella T6.

My advice is to use the oil recommended by the engine maker. AFAIK for at least Dodge gasoline engines Dodge does not recommend Rotella for use.
 

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Pure Plus is the same technology/gas to oil process that is used to produce Pennzoil Ultra Platinum oils.

Bearing speed plays a role in oil selection. A higher bearing speed means more sheer and more heat the oil is subjected too. This may account for the fact it appears a good number of motorcycle makers offer their own oil.

Honda apparently has its own oil for its motorcycle engines.

Suzuki ditto.

H-D ditto.

And Kawasaki.

Apparently if there has been any movement to Rotella for motorcycles it hasn't been driven by the motorcycle makers. Like was the case with Porsche engine the move to using Rotella was driven by people willing to jump over an excellent oil (Mobil 1 0w-40) and run Rotella instead because the excellent oil was approved by Porsche which of course caused some owners to suspect the oil.

One web site offers up 10 best motorcycle oils and Rotella is at the top of the list. But it is cited as being less likely to poison the exhaust because of its low ash content. Fails to consider the additives you point out are harmful to exhaust systems, at least those with a converter. This kind of reasoning calls into questioning just how the oil was selected.

Another site offers a list of the best synthetic motor oils. I note while Rotella T6 is listed it is listed as a Group III oil. Pennzoil Ultra Platinum is listed as a Group V oil. Rotella oil is touted as specifically made for heavy-duty engines. Packed with additives tailored to extend the life of DPF and EGR systems. I'm sure the SRT engines do not have DPF. Not even sure if they do EGR.

Where's the MSDS which (often but not always) details what the actual contents of the oil is? The MSDS used to be pretty informative but more and more all the components of the oil were labeled proprietary and not listed. As long as the safety data was correct this was sufficient.

I haven't looked at Rotella in a while. Let me get up to speed...

Pennzoil Ultra Platinum 0w-40 (Rotella T6)
Flash point: 224C (233C)
Pour Point: -51C (-51C)
Kinematic Viscosity @40C: 74.9 (90)
Kinematic Viscosity @100C: 13.7 (14.9)
Viscosity Index: 189 (Not Available)
Total Base Number: Not Available (10.2)
CCS Viscosity @-35C: 5850 (6300 @-30C)
Ash content: Not Available (1.0%)

Have to admit the new Rotella appears to be a step up from the old.

Still a Group III oil.

Still made for heavy-duty slow spinning diesel engines.

Still not approved for use by FCA/Dodge in its SRT engines or any other engines not counting the possibility it is approved for one of the diesel engines Dodge uses.

So for me meh. Not interested in Rotella T6.

My advice is to use the oil recommended by the engine maker. AFAIK for at least Dodge gasoline engines Dodge does not recommend Rotella for use.
It's funny how you reference "bearing speed" as a parameter of engine oil. I have never heard of or seen that reference in all my life. I have seen "sheer strength" as an indicator of how well the oil film will withstand mechanical forces.

Which do you think has more mechanical forces exerted on bearings and oil film?

A.. A smooth revving gas motor spinning at 7,000 + rpm?

B. A 30, 40, 50-1 compression diesel with massive rotating weight and thousands of ft lb of torque that would twist a car into a beer can?

This is a "no - brainier" on mechanical forces. Hence the name...."Heavy Duty" engine oil.

Back to the point of recommending this oil for a 392 Dodge Hemi Engine, if it is NOT a GTL oil that was DESIGNED and INVENTED for the 392 Dodge Hemi, the pistons will accumulate carbon and it is a matter of time before detonation occurs and resulting piston failure.....on the 392 Dodge Hemi.

Diesel oil will also run CLEANER than a comp gas oil because of the superior detergent package.


Every manufacturer wants everyone to use their house labeled oil. When you dig into it most of the time....it's usually a blend of semi-synthetic or just a plain oil. Then knowledge comes into play.

SRT and Shell worked for 3 years to invent a GTL oil that would keep the 392 Hemi alive. Personally.....I KNOW any Natural Gas to Liquid Oil is a serious upgrade to any other oil.....Period.
 
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