Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
337 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Do any of you get a squeak when shifting from 1st into 4th at a low RPM? It sounds like it's coming from the rear end, maybe the transmission. Any thoughts? Again, it happens mainly during the skip shift when RPM's don't seem high enough to make the shift.

Thank you in advance for your feedback.

B5
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,216 Posts
Some of us have creak that may be:

*parking brake cable rubbing against fuel tank (Seamaster had this)

*rear IRS cradle bushings can be a culprit

(I notice a slight creak [left rear] that happens taking off gently in 1st gear). I still need to inspect to see if the parking brake cable is rubbing...dealer didn't notice anything when I asked about this ~ 2 years ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Sorry, just re-read your post, I don't have the ship shift anymore, mine happens anytime I shift in low RPM from first thru fourth. I'll bet it happens everytime in mine, I just can't hear it at high RPMs or high(er) speeds.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,216 Posts
Ujoint's will sqeak when they start to go bad.
The LX / LC cars don't have u-joints - they utilize flex-discs (front and back) which are a fiber-reinforced rubber coupler with metal reinforced holes where the bolts pass through.

Mercedes has been using this design since the late 50s and since our cars are derived from the E-class, it has the same design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
The LX / LC cars don't have u-joints - they utilize flex-discs (front and back) which are a fiber-reinforced rubber coupler with metal reinforced holes where the bolts pass through.

Mercedes has been using this design since the late 50s and since our cars are derived from the E-class, it has the same design.
It isn't so much because Mercedes, it is because the differential "pumpkin" is fixed to the car frame (because of independent suspension), so there is no movement of the propeller shaft (well basically none) like in a traditional Hotchkiss drive where the differential bounces up and down with the wheels (and thus there is an angle and fore/aft motion of the prop shaft)

I want to say lots of old cars had a similar kind of "rag joint" in their steering columns... normally the kind of thing in your prop shaft is called a Giubo after the Italian guy who developed it, but for some reason, literally everyone misspells it "guibo" (seriously, google both and count hits :D) The construction of the thing is very similar to the way a tire is made.

It is much better than u-joint type Hotchkiss because you don't get the jerky motion of the prop shaft made by U-joints...
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top