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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've begun looking at pre 2015 models to get into a Challenger. It will be our fun car and we intend to put some miles on it, but not a daily driver. I ran across a 2009 with 145K miles, automatic, nicely optioned, leather, sunroof, navigation, clean carfax, tor-red with chrome wheels asking $9,500. The car looks nearly perfect inside and out for its age, all stock except for a SLP loudmouth catback exhaust. I haven't driven it yet as its local but still over an hour away and given the whole virus we've been keeping ventures out of the house to a minimum.

Would the 145K miles scare anyone off this deal? I did read through the high mileage post and see there are R/Ts out there with more mileage than that. My only other concern would be the possible drone off the SLP exhaust system as we would plan to use it for small road trips and hate drone.

Edit to add: So feeling a little better about the deal. Currently owned by a mechanic shop manager and bought about a year ago from owner who had for last 9 years. That owner was car enthusiast and did no mods but did carefully maintain. His shop inspected before he bought it and found no major issues. Has relatively new Pirellis, new rotors and brake pads, had it professionally detailed, recent Mobil 1 oil change, alignment, replaced windshield and added SLP exhaust.

Edit to add: We went and test drove the car last night. It was very well taken care of inside and out as you can see in the picture. The car spent its life in a garage so the interior and exterior trim pieces were in very good condition. On the test drive, I will say the 2011 STP we drove a couple days ago was a better driver, and felt more "buttomed up " than this one. The SLP exhaust was loud and it did drone. So while attractively priced and just a stunning looking car for its age, we passed on the deal.


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you're going to have to anticipate that wear items will turn up

wheel bearings (rear ones will be more $$ to replace)
brake rotors
master brake cylinder
brake calipers
driveshaft center carrier bearings
water pump
power steering pump
A/C compressor (more wear / use in hotter climates)
rear CV joints (half shafts) or boots that might split / tear
suspension bushings - especially front
upper ball joint/ front control arm bushings
Not to sound pessimistic, but with the miles - things wear out.

You'll have to anticipate you'll be spending to replace items that wear out between 145k - 200k.

That's being realistic, compared to buying a 50K mile vehicle and getting 100K of use before significant repairs start to build up.

I've owned vehicles (from new) over the years that I had 143K and a current one that's 149K
that I maintain "by the book" (and I do my own work wherever possible) and I've had to replace some of the above items over the years.

If you find a high mile vehicle with detailed service history - that's a sign of conscientious maintenance and the one to buy. But that's a rarity out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
you're going to have to anticipate that wear items will turn up



Not to sound pessimistic, but with the miles - things wear out.

You'll have to anticipate you'll be spending to replace items that wear out between 145k - 200k.

That's being realistic, compared to buying a 50K mile vehicle and getting 100K of use before significant repairs start to build up.

I've owned vehicles (from new) over the years that I had 143K and a current one that's 149K
that I maintain "by the book" (and I do my own work wherever possible) and I've had to replace some of the above items over the years.

If you find a high mile vehicle with detailed service history - that's a sign of conscientious maintenance and the one to buy. But that's a rarity out there.
Yes agreed. The car looks like it was maintained up to this point but I do realize things will need to be replaced. For reference, the other car we were looking at was 2011 R/T classic, auto, leather, sunroof, etc. with STP and 53k miles at $17K.
 

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I've begun looking at pre 2015 models to get into a Challenger. It will be our fun car and we intend to put some miles on it, but not a daily driver. I ran across a 2009 with 145K miles, automatic, nicely optioned, leather, sunroof, navigation, clean carfax, tor-red with chrome wheels asking $9,500. The car looks nearly perfect inside and out for its age, all stock except for a SLP loudmouth catback exhaust. I haven't driven it yet as its local but still over an hour away and given the whole virus we've been keeping ventures out of the house to a minimum.

Would the 145K miles scare anyone off this deal? I did read through the high mileage post and see there are R/Ts out there with more mileage than that. My only other concern would be the possible drone off the SLP exhaust system as we would plan to use it for small road trips and hate drone.
Depends.

If the car passes a thorough used car check out with flying colors that's a good sign the car has been taken care of and not abused. (Except maybe the fitting of that "loudmouth catback exhaust"...)

A car doesn't reach 145K miles and still run good and drive good without reasonable servicing, care, treatment, and some luck.

Have not driven a Dodge to big miles but have driven 2 cars to 150K miles, one to 161K miles and one to 317K miles.

Only one wheel bearing went bad, got noisy. This in the 317K miles car at around 80K miles. Replaced it. The replacement and originals were fine at 317K miles.

The 2 cars to 150K miles didn't need a water pump. One developed a pin hole leak in a radiator at around 60K miles. The other shed an accessory drive belt at some big miles when the alternator pulley wore out. Had to have the alternator replaced. It was a diesel and the glow plugs were deemed "bad" so the glow plugs were replaced at that time, too. The engine ran better after the new glow plugs so I believe the diagnosis was correct.

Oh, at near 150K miles the non diesel car throw out bearing failed and I had the clutch/throw out bearing replaced. 'course, the car you are considering is an automatic. I bought a used Dodge D200 pickup with around 50K miles on it. The 727 automatic started acting up after about a year with the truck. Had it replaced. Had the truck in for some service and the service department diagnosed bad ujoints. I ok'd their replacement. Just a few days later one ujoint failed -- the one closest to the transmission -- and the drive shaft wiping around broke the transmission housing. Dealer installed a new 727 transmission.

The 317K mile and 161K mile cars both needed water pumps: 172K miles, 100K+ miles; fuel pumps: 200K miles, 140K miles. The 161K miles car needed a new alternator towards the end. The alternator output would drop after a while.

At 130K miles had to replace all 3 radiators in the 161K mile car.

As the miles increase obviously water pumps, fuel pumps, alternators, starters, power steering pumps all turn into wear items. My experience is water pumps go first. The fuel pumps. Never had a starter need replacing. Or a power steering pump. (Or an A/C compressor. Regular use of the A/C really prolongs its life.)

No CV bearings went bad. With the 317K miles the boots started showing signs of failure so tech removed the shafts, cleaned/inspected the bearings and found them ok. Repacked with fresh grease installed new boots and put the shafts back in the car. These had around 50K miles on them when I sold the car and they were fine.

Besides 5K mile oil/filter services engine fuel filter and engine air and cabin air filters, spark plugs and other fluids replaced on schedule. V-belts and serpentine belts replaced on schedule. Had the brake hydraulic system flushed/bled every 2 years. For cars in which the clutch hydraulic system shared fluid with the brake system I had this flushed and bled too.

While not called for I had the coolant drained and refilled with fresh coolant every 4 years or so. This really helps prolong the life of the cooling system. The water pump at 172K miles wore out. The one in the other car developed a leak. But the 1st 6 years of that car's life it did not get a coolant change. Have not had to replace even one coolant hose. (If one does go bad generally the recommendation is to replace them all.)

Only replaced the coils in one car: the 161K miles cars. No CEL/errors or misfires, just curious. The new coils perked up the engine so a high miles engine even with no signs of coil issues could probably benefit from new coils.

At 132K miles a bad O2 sensor -- heater failed -- prompted me to replace all 4. Engine perked up from new sensors. My advice would be to if you get the 145K mile car unless they have been replaced recently budget for new coils and plugs and new O2 senors. And install a factory exhaust system.

The 317K miles car required new O2 sensors a couple of times over the years/miles. Figure 80K to 100K+ miles.

Never had a caliper go bad or a master cylinder. Brake fluid gets flushed/bled every 2 years. This is critical to help prolong brake system hardware life.

Bottom line is a high mileage car doesn't have to require rebuilding every other week to keep on the road. Provided it has had reasonable servicing and care in its life you might find it requires relatively little. 'course, it likely won't go forever on its water pump so you have to pay attention to any sounds from that area or any odor of anti-freeze.

The fuel pump on the 317K miles car just up and quit one day. Ditto the 161K miles car.

Brakes are no biggie to me. Brakes pads/rotors wear out and get replaced and then I drive X miles until the brakes need attention again. I replaced brakes by the "book". Whatever brake hardware the factory says to replace I replace. I don't experiment with aftermarket rotors or pads. Brake dust doesn't bother me. That's taken care of by the occasional washing. The first 1st 150K miles car I can't remember it needing brakes but that was a while back and my memory of that car is fading. The 2nd 150K miles car I'm sure never got new brakes, never needed them.

The 317K mile car needed brakes between 60K and 100K miles. The 161K miles car needed front brakes close to 150K miles. The rear brakes were worn but not down to the brake wear warning light level yet.

No suspension or steering component problems. No heater/AC problems. Various switches: brake light, clutch safety interlock switches wore out. If one wears out under the dash replace all of them is my advice. The switches are not expensive and a bad clutch interlock switch can strand you.

The window regulators wore out in the 317K miles car. The windows manifested a rather feeble drop when I pulled the handle.

Bottom line is a high mileage car can be a good buy. Depreciation is the biggest expense of owning a vehicle and a reasonably priced high mileage car means there is much less to depreciate.

Some of the money you save by avoiding big depreciation you will probably have to spend to keep the car in good working order, but unless the car turns into a money pit -- then you bail out of the car -- you should come out ahead.

But give the car a thorough used car check out. And if you buy the car get the stock exhaust system! Or get an adjustment to the price to get one fitted.
 

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It really depends (as other comments have said) on the maintenance. If the owner can prove detailed care for the car then that is a plus; however, the miles still come into play. Keep in mind the aging of parts and the car. If you were looking for something to modify for performance, I would suggest looking into something else, as this car would probably need some love to push out the numbers without the risk of damage (this comes with any car, but older ones would probably need to be looked over/ "restored"). Just keep in mind that a car with that many miles on it may need some love and TLC fairly soon down the road compared to a car with lesser miles. With that being said, if it was taken care of, it COULD lower those odds; but that isn't a set-in-stone thing either.

As for the exhaust, if you find a video of a car with the exhaust system, listen to it and (if provided) listen especially close to the interior recordings, that should be a sign if it is bad for droning or not. Thankfully the droning can be fixed but of course there is money involved with it.

Either way, best of luck with the car. If it turns out to be the one you want and the one you get, make some great memories (and don't forget picture or two). If not, there are plenty of yachts in the sea that are offered!
 

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My 2010 R/T didn't stay on the dealers lot a month with 162k on it listed at $9,995. Someone got a deal. Around 135k I had done Powerstop drilled/slotted rotors and pads. NGK Irdium plugs, Mobil 1 oil and filter, and new tires at 160k.
 

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I wouldnt spend $9500 on a 145k mile car. If you like it maybe offer $7 K but first thing i do is check the KBB for the value for each one you mentioned. Even if the KBB says its worth 9K, i wouldnt buy it but thats me. Ive never had a vehicle with that many miles. Ive gone to 116 K on my Jeep GC and that thing was breaking down all the time throughout so i dumped it when i could.

My Ram has 103K and i havent had to replace anything yet except for the usual things like brakes, serpentine belt, and spark plugs.
 

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My 2010 R/T didn't stay on the dealers lot a month with 162k on it listed at $9,995. Someone got a deal. Around 135k I had done Powerstop drilled/slotted rotors and pads. NGK Irdium plugs, Mobil 1 oil and filter, and new tires at 160k.
Having worked at a dealer before, id say your car got sent/bought out to a wholesale dealer instead of staying on the lot for regular customers. Thats what our dealer did with high mile cars anyways. Major dealers dont usually keep those on the lot.
 

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Having worked at a dealer before, id say your car got sent/bought out to a wholesale dealer instead of staying on the lot for regular customers. Thats what our dealer did with high mile cars anyways. Major dealers dont usually keep those on the lot.
I too expected that and that may be where it is now but I didn't see it parked on their used line.
 

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Having worked at a dealer before, id say your car got sent/bought out to a wholesale dealer instead of staying on the lot for regular customers. Thats what our dealer did with high mile cars anyways. Major dealers dont usually keep those on the lot.
Generally dealers like the cherry cars. Low miles. Clean. Just a wash/wax and detail and the car goes on the line.

All other cars just get wholesaled away.

But if a rather nice looking high mileage car comes in the dealer can chose to put it on the lot. I traded in a 2006 GTO with almost 50K miles on it to a Porsche dealer. The GTO ended up on the used car lot of the GM dealer down the street -- which was owned by the same family that owned the Porsche dealer. The GTO had nearly 50K miles which is not that high of miles but the car was in very nice shape -- no dents, scrapes, scratches, interior very nice, etcc -- and had been well taken care of. I would have kept it had not every time I took the car in for service one of the stupid GM techs not taken the car out and thrashed it. (Had a data logging/trip logging device in the car and from this I knew what had happened to the car between the time I dropped it off to the time I picked it up.)

Dealers like to have a good assortment of cars and in all price ranges. (I think the phrase is "A seat for every ass.")

The idea is when a prospective buyer walks onto the lot the dealer has a car for the buyer. So if a high mileage car comes in: 50K miles or more; it could very well end up on the lot rather than being wholesaled right away.

Of course it might not remain there long. Back in mid 2012 was looking at used cars. Looking for a large US sedan that I had need for.

Passed up a very nice 50K mile Intercepter Crown Vic. Was not the usual patrol car but the car used by the chief. Never was used for pursuit. Never used to carry suspects. Just the chief's drive to work and drive home car. The dealer wanted around $6K but my research was the price should have been closer to $4K. Was busy and never bothered to try to negotiate a lower price. Too bad as that would have been the prefect car for my needs: Ferrying around my elderly parents both of which loved Crown Vics.)

At some point in my search I ended up at a Hyundai dealer. He was getting truck loads of US sedans as trade ins every month. Talked to the used car manager. He said he keeps a lot of the cars that get traded in but he only keeps them 30 days. He said a very large percentage of them sell in 30 days. Those that don't are wholesaled after 30 days.

At any rate there were some very nice US sedans of all brands but my need for such a car changed and I never bought one.
 

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I wouldn't be worried about the mileage cause these rt challengers with the 5.7 hemi engines, I guarantee will run 300,000 miles.
My moms car was a old dodge intrepid from the late 90's and that thing lasted over 300,000 miles from a 24valve v6. So it just goes to show dodge knows how to build stout motors that last.
 

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I would be worried about any challenger that old having that rocker panel area RUST out. My 2010 R/T doesn't have it yet but from everything I have read, it's only a matter of time and expense$$$!!
 

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145k may or may not be to many miles. Where the car is located and spent its life is a big consideration, no matter how it was maintained. If it is in an area wher salt is used on the roads it most likely has body and undercarriage rust, however if it is a car from a dry climate, CA, AZ, MM, NV 145k would not be a deal breaker.
 

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I routinely see 300s and Chargers with well over 200,000 miles for sale, so I don't see why a Challenger should be significantly different in durability, even if relatively fewer Challenger owners rack up as many miles.
 
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