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Hey folks, I recently did the the first oil change on my 2013 SXT and used Mobil 1 5W-30 full synthetic because that weight of oil seemed to be what people here recommended for the 3.6 when I was nosing through threads on the subject. Like an idiot, I never really read through my owners manual and noticed that it said to use 5W-20. Apparently the oil weight changed for the 2013 models, or so I'm assuming. I haven't had any problems, so I'm guessing this is ok. Any suggestions or am I fine to continue using 5W-30? I live in Ohio, it's colder than (blank) in the winter and miserable in the summer, if that makes a difference.

Thank you!
 

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The 3.6 was originally emission certified with 5/30 then later 5/20. either weight is fine.
Not really. The VVT is very sensative on those motors. You are correct on the early ones taking 5/30 and now the later ones saying 5/20. Use what it calls for. I have seen some check engine lights come through our shop due to incorrect oil weight on the 3.6L's

Not saying you need to run out and change your oil to the OP. It's not going to damage anything...its just the incorrect oil weight may throw a check engine light it may not. And I'm not saying that you WILL get a check engine light I'm just telling you its possible with these motors. As what ken kamins said your ok and you may never see a check engine light at all.

Leave the 5/30 in for now but I would use the 5/20 next oil change.

P1521 - Incorrect engine oil type is the code you will probably get if it ever does show up.
 

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What I have seen is exactly the opposite. These were originally shipped with 5W20 and the early owner's manuals said use 5W20 ONLY. Well, people started complaining because 20 does not protect as well in hot weather and you get the ticking in the valvetrain. So I noticed that the new ones say 5W20 and they added that 5W30 is acceptable.

I ALWAYS have used 5W30 and always will. Honestly I might try a 0W40 in the summertime. These newer engines with cam phasers and VVT and junk on them are finnicky and they like a quality oil. The thin stuff is used strictly for CAFE numbers and fuel economy...not for the longest life possible. Personally I'd rather protect my engine better.
 

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2013 Owners Manual specs 5w-20, but also states that 5w-30 may be used if it meets Fiat requirements. Lots of debate on this topic, but I'm sure you're OK with Mobil syn 5w-30 even in the dead of winter here in the Midwest.
Agree with WXman that the switch to 5w-20 was mainly for CAFE requirements.
 

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What I have seen is exactly the opposite. These were originally shipped with 5W20 and the early owner's manuals said use 5W20 ONLY. Well, people started complaining because 20 does not protect as well in hot weather and you get the ticking in the valvetrain. So I noticed that the new ones say 5W20 and they added that 5W30 is acceptable.

I ALWAYS have used 5W30 and always will. Honestly I might try a 0W40 in the summertime. These newer engines with cam phasers and VVT and junk on them are finnicky and they like a quality oil. The thin stuff is used strictly for CAFE numbers and fuel economy...not for the longest life possible. Personally I'd rather protect my engine better.
What do you base all of this on. Do you work for an engine design company. Why do people get on here and act like they know more than the engineers who made the engines. Why do you pretend to know more about this. I am not talking about what they were shipped with and then what changed. I am talking about you might change to some thing else that was never recommended by the manufacturer.
 

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Thicker doesn't always mean better protection. Why not just fill up with motor honey next time? That should protect better than anything else, right? ;)

Xw20 has been around and in use for YEARS, it's nothing new and, not very surprisingly, I haven't seen anyone complaining about premature engine wear, failure, or engine rebuilds as a result of running the mfr-recommended Xw20 oil.

The same thing was said about Xw30 when it started being recommended. Modern engines have tighter tolerances and have more precise, clean machining than engines from the a couple of decades ago. There are reasons why modern engines can go many hundreds of thousands of miles without needing a rebuild. Those old, dirty engines from the 60s running Xw40? Yeah...good luck getting 100k out of them before needing to do at least a partial rebuild. :)
 
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What do you base all of this on. Do you work for an engine design company. Why do people get on here and act like they know more than the engineers who made the engines. Why do you pretend to know more about this. I am not talking about what they were shipped with and then what changed. I am talking about you might change to some thing else that was never recommended by the manufacturer.
Well where do I start? First of all I grew up around cars and my father is a master mechanic of 40+ years experience and he won't touch the thin 5W20 stuff since it ended up costing him a $1,500 repair on the top end of his engine last year. Only reason he was using it to start with is because that's what was in it from the factory.

Second I already stated that the "engineers" specified 5W20 purely for CAFE numbers and NOT for longevity...and later added that 5W30 is acceptable when they realized that owners were correct and heavier oil is better for the engine. Engineers believe it or not do not always protect the consumer. They are there to serve Chrysler's interest before yours. I know that may be a shock to you.

Third the owners manual states that you can change to whatever oil you want that wasn't in the engine when it was shipped to the dealer, as long as it meets viscosity and Chrysler material standard specs.

Fourth I have owned dozens of Chrysler V6 and V8 engines over the years and I've used all the various oils myself and I know what these engines like and what they don't.

Fifth if you aren't going to listen to people who know what they are talking about on a forum, why did you post the question?
 

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What do you base all of this on. Do you work for an engine design company. Why do people get on here and act like they know more than the engineers who made the engines. Why do you pretend to know more about this. I am not talking about what they were shipped with and then what changed. I am talking about you might change to some thing else that was never recommended by the manufacturer.
There were no changes made to the 3.6 when the oil was changed to 5-20. Wxman is correct, the change was made for CAFE reasons. 5-20 or 5-30 is ok for use in the 3.6. Fwiw Chrysler Tech since 1990.
 

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Well where do I start? First of all I grew up around cars and my father is a master mechanic of 40+ years experience and he won't touch the thin 5W20 stuff since it ended up costing him a $1,500 repair on the top end of his engine last year. Only reason he was using it to start with is because that's what was in it from the factory.

Second I already stated that the "engineers" specified 5W20 purely for CAFE numbers and NOT for longevity...and later added that 5W30 is acceptable when they realized that owners were correct and heavier oil is better for the engine. Engineers believe it or not do not always protect the consumer. They are there to serve Chrysler's interest before yours. I know that may be a shock to you.

Third the owners manual states that you can change to whatever oil you want that wasn't in the engine when it was shipped to the dealer, as long as it meets viscosity and Chrysler material standard specs.

Fourth I have owned dozens of Chrysler V6 and V8 engines over the years and I've used all the various oils myself and I know what these engines like and what they don't.

Fifth if you aren't going to listen to people who know what they are talking about on a forum, why did you post the question?
You just said it as long as you stick to the viscosity standards and additives specked by the car maker. That was my point. Don't change to different viscosity. I am 63 and been around cars all my life too. That dose not make me an expert on oil. Just because your father had a problem with an engine doesn't mean it was the oil. Most engines when there new or rebuilt go boom for other reason not the oil that was used. Lastly who said these guys who tell me to use something other than what the manufacture specs are experts. Back up your expertise with a degree in the oil industry. I did not post the question the op did that's not me.
 
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