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I wanted to start a new upgrade thread for the Alpine 6-speaker amplified system (276 watt amplifier). This will contain lots of details that I either couldn't find in other threads or found conflicting information in other threads. At the very least, it will put all of the information in a single post. This is NOT an installation "how to" though - there are some other really good posts for that already. Although, I do include some noted about specific issues I ran into with the speakers I used and some solutions/work-arounds.

I wanted to get a few things out of the way before I start. First, as best as I can tell, the amplified Alpine system appears to be using a 6-channel amp. I believe that the radio feeds the amp with 4-channel audio and then the amp outputs 6-channel audio to 6 different speakers. The dash speakers only play mids/highs, the door speakers only play bass and the rear-deck speakers seem to play full audio. However, I cannot be 100% sure of this - this is just what I've gathered based on the Chilton wiring diagrams and the fact that there doesn't seem to be any "in-line" capacitors or crossovers.

First off, let's start with what speakers the systems comes with from the factory...

Stock Speakers
Front Dash: 3.5" paper-cone midrange/tweeters - ~2.5 ohm
Doors: 6"x9" bass speakers - ~2.5 ohm
Rear Deck: 6.5" midrange speakers - ~2 ohm

So all factory speakers are between ~2 ohm and ~2.5 ohm (measured with multimeter). The 3.5" dash speakers are the only speakers that use a cheap paper cone. All speakers are single-cone speakers. There are no actual tweeters or any 2-way speakers from the factory.


Speaker Polarity
Before I replaced the door speakers, I bought a simple $12 speaker polarity tester. Since I was seeing conflicting information about which speaker wire adapters to use, I wanted to be 100% sure the polarity was correct as I replaced the speakers. For example, some threads said you needed the Metra 10-050 adapters while others said they used the Metra 72-6514 adapters. Both of these adapters will "fit", but they are reverse in terms of polarity.

So after I replaced the first door speaker using the 10-050 adapter that Crutchfield sent with them, I tested the polarity and found that it was reversed! So then I checked the other door, which still had the stock speaker and is was normal polarity. That tells me that the 10-050 is the wrong adapter to use for the doors in the Challenger - we should actually be using 72-6514 for the doors.

Then, before I went any further, I tested the polarity of the dash speakers - and found that both the stock speaker with no adapter and the aftermarket Infinity speaker with adapter were *reverse* polarity! So is seems that the dash speakers come from the factory setup for reverse-polarity.

Then I checked the stock rear-deck speakers - they were normal polarity. However, the door and rear-deck speaker wiring is "flipped" - so you actually need different speaker adapters for the doors and rear deck in order to keep the polarity correct on both (this is all confirmed in the Chilton wiring diagrams as well).

Here are the correct speaker adapters needed for my 2018 Challenger (in order to retain the polarity of all speakers as they come from the factory):

Dash: Metra 71-039c (old) or 72-7902 (new)
Door: Metra 72-6514
Rear-Deck: Metra 71-050


Replacement Speakers
I went with the following replacement speakers:

Front Dash: Infinity Reference REF-3032cfx - 3.5" two-way speakers - ~3.5 ohm
Doors: Infinity Reference REF-9632ix - 6"x9" two-way speakers - ~3.5 ohm
Rear Deck: Infinity Reference REF-6532ex - 6.5" two-way speakers - ~3.5 ohm

The dash speakers installed without issue.

The door speaker would not fit in the stock speaker mounting bracket that Dodge uses to attach the speaker to the door - the Infinity speaker basket hits into indentations on the mounting bracket that appear to send water away from the speakers. I have seen that others have "modified" the mounting bracket with a dremel to work around that issue. Personally, I wanted to avoid hacking up the stock mounting bracket, so what I did was to install the included spacer on the *back* of the speaker instead of on the front of it like most people do. So there was the speaker, the spacer and then the stock mounting bracket (see pic below). This pushed the Infinity speaker out a little further and made it fit in the stock mounting brackets without issue. It also allowed the stock speaker mounting bracket to offer better "protection" of the speaker since the back of the speaker doesn't stick out any further into the door than the stock speaker did (normally, since the aftermarket speaker is "deeper", more of it would stick out of the back of the stock speaker mounting bracket - it would actually stick out past the end of the bracket a little). Only problem was that the screws included with the speakers weren't long enough - but I found screws that came with the REF-6532ex speakers that worked perfectly.



The rear-deck speakers come with an adapter plate that is used to mount it. The stock speakers mount via a 3-screw system, whereas most speakers mount with 4 screws. So basically, you attach the adapter plate to the speaker first via 4 screws - and then that whole adapter/speaker assembly attches to the rear deck using the 3 stock mounting holes on the rear-deck. However, this didn't work out so well... The screws that they give you to attach the speaker to the adapter plate are a little too long - so when you install the adapter plate onto the speaker, the pointy screws stick out on the bottom of the adapter plate, which then "interfere" with rear deck when you try to install the adapter/speaker assembly onto the rear deck (the tips of the screws hit the rear deck metal, not allowing it to sit flush on the rear deck)! You would actually need to drill holes in the rear deck to use things as-is. I ended up just "shortening" the screws with a dremel (all 8 of them), which allowed the adapter plate to sit flush on the rear deck for proper mounting. No idea how others have been handling this issue. Was very frustrating, to be honest - especially since Crutchfield lists these speakers as fitting properly. Between that and the wrong speaker wire adapters they provided for the doors, I was a under-impressed with Crutchfield. One of the reasons I buy from them is to hopefully avoid issues like this... I will let me know my findings though.

I also bought some "Fast Rings" to use for the door and rear-deck speaker install (first time trying them). Honestly, I'm not so sure they are worth it, at least for this car. They come with 3 parts - a "backing" part that is supposed to attach to the outside door panel behind the door speaker, a foam ring to use between the speaker and the door mount and a larger foam ring that goes around the whole speaker itself to "seal" the area between the front of the speaker and the door speaker grille. I didn't use the "backing" part since there was something in the way behind the speaker (and I was concerned about it retaining water). I didn't use the ring that is supposed to go between the speaker and the door (just didn't make sense in this install). I did, however, use the largest ring to help seal the speaker and the door panel so that less sound "escapes" into the door. Not sure how much of a difference it makes. I used that same larger ring for the rear- deck speakers as well, but again, no idea how much difference it makes. Not sure they are worth the $20 cost for each set of fast rings...


Results
I did not buy all of the speakers at once. I bought them here and there when they were on sale and when I had the money.

I upgraded the 3.5" dash speakers first. The Infinity speakers had much higher-quality cone materials and were two-way speakers instead of a single-cone paper speaker. The dash speaker upgrades made a pretty noticeable improvement including much better highs. In my opinion, the stock dash speakers should have included dedicated tweeters from the factory.

A few weeks later, I upgraded the 6"x9" door speakers. I was expecting cheap paper-cone speakers based on what I found in the dash, but the door speakers were much better made and used a higher-quality (non-paper) material for the speaker cone. The door speaker upgrades gave me deeper, less-boomy bass. I even noticed that my side mirrors vibrated more with the Infinity 6x9's. However, I found that I had to turn the bass up a little more since they were less "boomy"- but the end result is deeper, more accurate bass.

Then, a few days later, I upgraded the 6.5" rear deck speakers. Again, I found that the stock rear-deck speakers were made with decent materials and had a decent weight to them. I actually think that the stock speakers weighed *more* than the Infinity speakers that I replaced them with - even the magnet was slightly bigger on the stock speakers. However, that being said, the rear-deck speaker upgrades provided the biggest difference of them all! The stock speakers were barely noticeable, even when I faded the sound to the rear a little. With the Infinity speakers, I had *way* more sound from the rear - and highs that just didn't exist from the rear at all before. I actually had to fade the sound towards the front a little to avoid having the rear-deck speakers overwhelm the front speakers! Huge, huge difference. They also seem to add to the overall bass a little as well.

After replacing all speakers, I had to adjust the EQ and fader settings substantially. Typically, I would have bass at +3, mids at 0 or +1 and treble at +2 or +3. With the Infinity speakers, I have bass +4, mid -2 and treble -2. However, I have only spent a small amount of time in the car since replacing the door and rear-deck speakers, so the EQ and fade settings may change over time as the speakers break-in and I spend a little more time with them. The overall sound definitely got way brighter - *especially* when the rear-deck speakers were replaced.


What's Next
Honestly, I don't feel that I have enough control over the sound with simple bass/mid/treble and a fader control. I think that I will eventually be bypassing the stock amp and using some type of processor and external amp(s) in the near future. Right now, I'm leaning towards a Rockford Fosgate DSR1 w/t-harness and some external amps - not sure if I want to go with a a single 6-channel amp for speakers and a separate monoblock amp for a sub or multiple amps (such as a 4 channel amp for front speakers and 3 channel for rear speakers + amp). But ultimately, I want more control over each channel, such as being able to adjust crossover points for each speaker, better EQ and separate gain control for dash, door and rear-deck speakers. I think that the stock amp is EQ'ing based on the limited power of the stock amp and the limitations of the stock speakers - and that I can get MUCH better sound quality if I am able to modify the crossovers, EQ and gain on my own, separately for each channel. Of course, doing that is going to cost me lots of $$$ and time. :) A little at a time though...

I would *love* to get some input on peoples experience with the DSR1 and what amps you would recommend. Originally, I wasn't planning on going this far, but don't think I'd be happy with a simple 4-channel amp with only bass/mid/treble and fader controls. I need more control. :)


Resources
Chilton Wiring Diagrams:
Site: https://www.roswell-nm.gov/1112/Chilton-Auto-Repair-Library
Select Repair -> Wiring Diagrams -> Components -> Speaker to see speaker wiriing diagrams

Speaker Polarity Testing Tool (highly recommended!):
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07MQ55QHL/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 (available many places, but can get "free" 1-day shipping with Prime.
 

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So you were able to swap in these speakers on the stock amp? Any issues their speakers drawing to much power maybe at max volume?

Great writeup i would love to replace the factory system without adding any subs or anything in the future.

Side question, do you have any vibration in the doors/rear deck that you addressed? I cant imagine its any better with better/louder speakers
 

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So you were able to swap in these speakers on the stock amp? Any issues their speakers drawing to much power maybe at max volume?

Great writeup i would love to replace the factory system without adding any subs or anything in the future.

Side question, do you have any vibration in the doors/rear deck that you addressed? I cant imagine its any better with better/louder speakers
Correct - I just swapped the stock speakers out with these aftermarket speakers without changing anything with the stock amp. These speakers will actually draw *less* power from the stock amp than the stock speakers did, because the stock speakers are ~2.5 ohm and the replacements are ~3.5 ohm. The lower the ohms of the speakers, the more power they can draw from the amp. So if anything, I'll actually be using less power from the stock amp (assuming you can turn the radio up all of the way without causing any distortion).

Honestly, I didn't have any vibration-related issues with the stock or the aftermarket speakers. I may run into issues after I add more powerful amps, but so far so good. I do have sound deadening materials here and will probably sound-deaden at lest the doors and rear-deck eventually, but I want to get a power-window issue addressed under warranty before I mess with that. I had to deaden the doors, roof and rear-deck in my Impala due to vibrations - but the Challenger interior seems to handle the bass much better than the Impala did - well, that and I have an aftermarket amp in the Impala. :) That being said, ANY car will benefit from sound-deadening - even if there aren't any vibration-related issues. Sound-deadening will reall increase bass output fom the doors.
 

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Awesome, good to know.

I have some good rattling in the doors and the third brake light. Almost 4 years of daily driving
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Actually, I should mention... One place that I DID notice vibration-related issues was the very edge of the door panel when the doors are open. There is like an inch of plastic against the door at the edge of the door panel. I only noticed it when the door was open though. To solve that, I simply installed some felt tape on the back of that area when i had the door panels off to do the speakers.

I've learned that felt tape is the perfect thing to use to get rid of plastic-on-plastic or plastic-on-metal vibrations. :) I also used some on the dash panel when I did the dash speakers just in case. Basically, anywhere plastic would be touching plastic, I put some felt tape there. :) It also "tightens" the interior a little.
 

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This was a great write up!

I had the base 6 speaker set up in my '09. So, I only changed out the speakers, and nothing else.

It was too long ago to remember what speakers I bought, but the result was miles better than the stock speakers.

I want to comment on the door speakers. I had to modify the plastic bracket, as you call it. The magnets on my replacement speakers were too large. Here's the funny thing... In ordering replacement speakers, I NEVER gave any consideration to depth. Well, lets just say I wouldn't have needed screws to hold them in place. The were magnetically attached to the steel of my doors. :nerd:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I want to comment on the door speakers. I had to modify the plastic bracket, as you call it. The magnets on my replacement speakers were too large. Here's the funny thing... In ordering replacement speakers, I NEVER gave any consideration to depth. Well, lets just say I wouldn't have needed screws to hold them in place. The were magnetically attached to the steel of my doors. :nerd:
That it too funny!! I'd have to think that they also interfered with rolling the windows all of the way down too?!
 

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So, my reasoning for always considering the exact speakers you chose would be increased volume. Thinking more efficient speakers would have better volume. But with the new speakers being 1 ohm difference, I was concerned it would negate any increase in volume. Now I see Crutchfield has even added a caution



I thought others who changed the same speakers indicated they had increased volume, but now I'm thinking it may not be worth the change. I actually listen at 38 when driving with the windows down, and I have increased the gain on my mp3s as well. Less volume would be very disappointing

A Guy

Edit: I see Infinity rates these speakers at 3 ohms

General Specifications
Description 3-1/2" (87mm) coaxial car speaker
Power Handling 25W RMS, 75W peak
Sensitivity (@ 2.83V)91dB
Frequency Response 85Hz – 21kHz
Impedance 3.0 ohms

Description 6"x9" (152mm x 230mm) coaxial car speaker
Power Handling 100W RMS, 300W peak
Sensitivity (@ 2.83V) 94dB
Frequency Response 46Hz – 20kHz
Impedance 3.0 ohms

Description 6-1/2" (160mm) shallow-mount coaxial car speaker
Power Handling 55W RMS, 165W peak
Sensitivity (@ 2.83V) 93dB
Frequency Response 57Hz – 21kHz
Impedance 3.0 ohms

https://www.infinityspeakers.com/on/demandware.static/-/Sites-masterCatalog_Harman/default/dwc8a9a6c9/pdfs/Infinity_Reference_Speakers_Spec_Sheet_English.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
So, my reasoning for always considering the exact speakers you chose would be increased volume. Thinking more efficient speakers would have better volume. But with the new speakers being 1 ohm difference, I was concerned it would negate any increase in volume.
I am certainly no expert - and this actually becomes very complex, but my "simple" understanding is that the impedance is only one facter when it comes to how "loud" a speaker will sound. You also have to take into account the speakers "Sensitivity" rating. I don't believe that the impedance and sensitivity are "tied" to each other. So you could have a 4-ohm speaker that sounds just as loud as a 3-ohm speaker, simply because the 4-ohm speaker has a much higher senativity rating. No idea if the Infinity speakers are more sensitive than the stock speakers though. Again, that is my understanding - but I'd love to hear from someone that has a more in-depth knowledge on the subject.

Now I see Crutchfield has even added a caution

I've seen this warning mentioned multiple times now, but have yet to actually see it - where do you see this on the Crutchfield site? I'm just curious.

I thought others who changed the same speakers indicated they had increased volume, but now I'm thinking it may not be worth the change. I actually listen at 38 when driving with the windows down, and I have increased the gain on my mp3s as well. Less volume would be very disappointing
We have to remember that some people are using these speakers to replace the stock speakers that came with the 6-speaker "base-level" system, where there is no amplifier - and the speakers that come with the base-level system are differernt than those that come with the Alpine amplified system. On those base-level systems, the dash speakers are 8 ohms and I believe the door speakers are 4 ohms - so on that base system, the aftermarket speakers may actually be louder, especially if the aftermarket speakers have a much higher "Sensitivity" rating than the stock speakers (no idea what the stock sensitivity ratings are though).

Edit: I see Infinity rates these speakers at 3 ohms
Regarding the impedance - I am going by the impedance reported by my digital multimeter when testing the speaker without it being connected to anything. For the stock speakers, it reports 2.3-2.5 (starts at 2.5 then eventually goes down to 2.3 if I leave the multimeter connected long enough). For the Infinity speakers, it reports 3.5. I've never really seen a speaker manufacturer list their impedance ratings as a decimal value (such as 3.6 or 2.5) - they always seem to report the value in "whole" numbers. Honestly, I can't say with absolute certainty if they really are 3 ohm or 3.5 ohm, but I'd tend to believe the multimeter readings over any manufacturer "specs". :) When I test the stock speakers from my Impala with the multimeter, which have 4-Ohm stamped right on them, the multimeter reports 4.0 ohms though, so I tend to think that the multimeter readings are correct. That all being said though, the way I am measuring is the same between the stock and Infinity speakers, so the difference is what is important, I think (?), which is a 1 ohm difference.

So far, I haven't noticed much, if any difference in overall volume with the Infinity speakers. But it's really hard to judge since every source and even every song are at different levels. For example, when playing Spotify through Android Auto, one song can be much louder than another song. I'll report back after I spend a little more time in the car, but so far, the volume hasn't changed significantly either way.

From the beginning, I planned on going with some sort of aftermarket amp though, so I wasn't too concerned with reduced volume, if that were to happen, since I plan on installing a more powerful aftermarket amp in the near future.

EDIT: At the very least, I would recommend at least upgrading the dash speakers. They are the easiest to replace and the better "highs" that they offer are worth it, in my opinion. The stock dash speakers are also the cheapest of them all, being that they are paper-cone speakers, unlike the door and rear-deck speakers. If you want more sound from the rear speakers, then I would definitely replace them as well - just be warned that they are *WAY* brighter than the stock speakers. Honestly, the door speakers seemed to make the smallest difference - but definitely do seem to provide deeper bass than the stock door speakers did.

Oh - one more thing about the dash speakers - the stock dash speakers have speaker cloth built into the speaker. When I replace them, I also ordered some speaker cloth and glued it to the bottom of the dash piece - this way, nothing can fall into the dash speaker "grille" and land on the speaker cone(s), causing vibration issues. I should have taken some pictures of what I did for this...
 

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Thanks for the info. I'm thinking that a well known speaker manufacturer would list the correct ohm rating for their speaker, since they know the frequency response and impedance, etc. Possible it's more than measuring with a multimeter would show, but since the multimeter was used to measure both old and new, we can assume the difference is at least very close to your findings.

Since I would change speakers seeking increased volume, and any improvement in sound quality would only be a bonus (listening loud with windows open is not the best way to judge sound quality), I'm seeking that and not convinced speakers alone will bring that, and I have no plans to add an amp, etc.

A Guy
 

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Yeah, I honestly don't know for sure how manufacturers come up with their ohm ratings. My understanding is that the impedance is different depending on the frequency, so I think they report "nominal" impedance - but for all I know, it might be "average" impedance. Really not sure. I just know that audio equipment specs tend to be dependant on exactly how they test things, which isn't always apples-to-apples between different companies (even though they want you to think that it is) - and can't always be trusted. I would think that Infinity speaker specifications would be pretty accurate though (it's not like we're talking about Boss, Pyle or Dual - or some other "less than optimal" audio equipment that typically have specs that you know aren't 100% honest). From what I've seen, the multimeter readings usually match the specified ohm values for a speaker, but I can't guarantee that it's always accurate.

But like you said, I think the difference is what is important here - and even more important is the end result - which is that I didn't notice any significant difference in volume level after the speaker change. If you were considering changing the speakers only to gain volume and not to improve sound quality, then I definitely wouldn't recommend it - at least not with the Alpine amplified system. You'd be spending a couple hundred dollars for no real change in volume. In hindsight, even the sound quality difference isn't huge when using the stock amp. To be perfectly honest, I don't think I'd recommend people spend the time or money on replacing all of the speakers unless they also plan on replacing the stock amp. The Alpine amplified system has much better stock speakers that a lot of other cars I've owned.
 

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Nice info here. It looks to me that this is a lot like the 276W system in my 2012 Charger. I did an extensive write-up on that upgrade in the sister forum a few years back and that system is still running strong. So, to back up what you have put here, definitely go with the speaker replacement and if you want you can upgrade by steps to a true tuned aftermarket system and get improvements all the way. Stopping at any point will leave you happy. I first did speakers, then incorporated the LOC, sub and amps, then added the sound processors. All over several months. Could have stopped at any point as each was a noticeable improvement.

The system I put in the Charger was about $800 total when I was done and used the infinity Reference speakers recommended here with an added 10" sealed sub, JBL 3-channel and 4-channel Amps (The GT series, but models are different now), a pair of mini-DSP sound processors (but they make a better single unit specifically for cars now), and a Pac Audio LOC, but for 2015-up cars that unit would be different and expensive, so the Audio Control LC7i might be better. The Infinity's sound great and I can say that the 506W Alpine in my new Scat Pack doesn't sound nearly as good as that system. Once it is tuned it sounds pretty awesome. I used the open source REW software from the Home Theater Shack forum, and a calibrated mic on my laptop. It was a lot of fun tuning the system and the options are endless. This is the curve I ended up with.
 

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So, to back up what you have put here, definitely go with the speaker replacement and if you want you can upgrade by steps to a true tuned aftermarket system and get improvements all the way.
Yeah, for me, the speaker replacement was really just a "pre-req" before I started adding amps/processors. There is nothing like great-sounding, powerful car audio! And I disagree with @A Guy - I think that sound quality still plays a very important part - even when the windows are open and the radio is really loud. A really good-sounding system is just sooooo nice - *especially* at loud volumes! :)

The system I put in the Charger was about $800 total when I was done and used the infinity Reference speakers recommended here with an added 10" sealed sub, JBL 3-channel and 4-channel Amps (The GT series, but models are different now), a pair of mini-DSP sound processors (but they make a better single unit specifically for cars now), and a Pac Audio LOC, but for 2015-up cars that unit would be different and expensive, so the Audio Control LC7i might be better. The Infinity's sound great and I can say that the 506W Alpine in my new Scat Pack doesn't sound nearly as good as that system. Once it is tuned it sounds pretty awesome. I used the open source REW software from the Home Theater Shack forum, and a calibrated mic on my laptop. It was a lot of fun tuning the system and the options are endless. This is the curve I ended up with.
Very nice setup!! I'll be honest, while I love good audio (home audio and car audio), my DIY car audio experience is pretty limited. Typically, I just replace the stock head-unit, the stock speakers and maybe add an inexpensive, low-wattage 4-channel amp and I'm happy (I was really impressed with the Kicker KEY180.4 with it's auto-tuning capabilities). However, being that I can't just replace the head-unit in the 2018 Challenger like I could with older cars, it makes upgrading a little more "complex". I'm pretty comfortable with audio in general and know enough that I really want to get into the full processor setup that I have complete control over and can tune myself - and take things to the next level in my Challenger. The Rockford Fosgate DSR1 and T-harness combination looks like the perfect setup for the Challenger. It's a great LOC and DSP all-in-one and actually seems pretty damn awesome for the ~$250 price tag! I really like how you can adjust everything from an Android or iPhone device instead of needing a Windows laptop for tuning. However, I will need to get a good RTA setup to tune it properly myself, which is all new to me. I'm also very "green" in the "clean install" area when it comes to processors, multiple amps, etc. Was considering paying a shop to do it, but that would cost a small fortune and I kind of want to learn a little more about the tuning aspect. I just hope I can make a nice clean setup like you have going on! :)


I'll attest that I ran into the exact same mounting issues with these speakers in the door and rear deck positions.
Thank you! I'm so glad to hear that it wasn't just me!! I mean for the rear deck speaker issue - the speaker, the adapter plate and the screws all come with the Infinity speakers - it makes no sense that they include screws that are too damn long to correctly mount the speaker to their own adapter plate!!!! On the other hand, the fact that the Infinity 6"x9" speaker hits into the stock door mounting adapter - I can completely understand that - and am used to dealing with stuff like that when replaceing stock speakers with aftermarket speakers, but the whole "screws are too long" issue with the 6.5" rear-deck speakers was annoying - that should not happen when all of the parts are coming from the speaker manufacturer, in the same box. :) I also wasn't happy when I found that Crutchfield is supplying the wrong speaker wire adapters - again, that is something that they "pride" themselves on - they should get it right. I seriously wonder how many people are driving around with the speaker polarity reversed becuase of Crutchfield including the wrong wiring adapters. That being said, I will definitely let them know (backed with "evidence") so that they hopefully correct the issue. Mistakes happen - it's how people handle the mistakes that really matters. :)
 

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Also - if anyone has any recommendations for amps, please speak up! I'm not looking to spend a ton of money here, but I will spend up to ~$600 for the amp(s). Still not sure if I'm better off going with a single 6-channel amp or (2) 4-channel amps (for example). It almost seems like I can get (2) 4-channel amps for less than the price of a single 6-channel amp - but then again, a single 6-channel amp would make for a "cleaner" install, I would think. Since I will be using the DSR1, it really shouldn't matter if I use a single amp or multiple amps, since I will be controlling everything though the DSR1 DSP (so I won't be using any crossovers or EQ features on the amps themselves).

I'm not worried about a sub yet - I may even end up just getting a powered under-the-seat sub - just something to help firm up the bottom end a little (not looking for subs to shake the whole car until the bolts come loose - just not my "thing"). :)

Thank you!
 

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That Rockford solution is pretty good and they make good stuff. Admittedly, the mini-DSP solution is amazing, but sorta for geeks (like me) because it can do so much. As for an RTA solution, all you need is a laptop and a $20 Dayton audio calibrated mic from Parts Express. That mic works on mobile devices too and has an aux extension for signals. The mic comes with a downloadable calibration file that you can load into REW. In that program you can calibrate the built-in soundcard and generate frequency response curves that the software will build parametric filter code that you then import into the DSP unit. It will also do crossover filtering and timing delay. One of the best improvements I have experienced in sound was adjusting the speaker timing based on distance from the listener. It is like focusing a camera, everything just starts to come into perfect detail. My sub sounds like it is build into the dash because everything hits at once. So, for the price of joining the HomeTheaterShack forum to get the REW software and $20 you get one of the best RTA packages out there with lots of on line help and forum info.

As for amps, I am happy with the JBL (same company as Infinity/Harmon/AG) and it looked like the best value for the dollar to me. I actually bought all my Infinity and JBL stuff from their factory outlet site. People think they need tons of wattage, but really you don't and it is better to match your amps and speakers for power handling. Overdoing either is a waste of money. Also-the NVX house brand digital amps from Sonicelectronix are really good too. Class D amps use less power in case that is important, like in my Dart with a tiny alternator. Actually, that NVX stuff in general is pretty good, especially their amp install kits. I'm not the kind of guy that needs to show off brands (except for my car!) so I don't usually go with the high-end/high marketing stuff. Usually overpriced.

As an FYI in case anyone else is curious, the Mopar speaker replacements are based on Kicker KS speakers. So if you are comparison shopping that should be your standard. Kicker people have been really nice when I have asked them technical stuff too.

Dang, now I am getting the bug to start tearing in to the Challenger and it's only been two weeks!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yeah, the Kicker KEY180.4 amp I put in my Impala has auto-tuning DSP (my first experience with car DSP) - you setup the included mic in the car, press a button and it generates sounds from each speaker in order to automatically set time alignment, EQ, etc. I really liked how it caused the voices to seem to come out of the windshield after it was done. However, you can't modify the setup it comes up with at all (you can only "fine tune" with the regular headunit EQ and fader). I was considering it for the Challenger, but it's only 4-channel (auto-tune only works with one of them if you install more than one) and isn't 2-ohm stable. So I've decided that I want more flexibility in the Challenger - and want to stick with a full 6-channel setup, which is why I'm looking at the DSR1 and external amps instead. The DSR1 does support full time-alignment and parametric EQ. It really does seem to be very powerful considering the price. Since it has 8-channel outputs and available T-harness for the Challenger, it seems like the perfect fit for what I'm looking to do.

My biggest issue is going to be in the physical install area and the tuning aspect. Not looking that forward to the install part, but I am looking forward to the tuning part with an RTA setup. Still have a LOT to learn though.

Thanks for all of the input and info - I apprecaite it. I'll probably be hitting you up for some tips when I get that far! :)
 

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Looking forward to reading about it!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
A little more than I wanted to spend, but I'm considering the JL Audio XD600/6v2 amp - 75Wx4 RMS @ 4 ohms. It's $600, but I've always heard good things about JL Audio. I really do think I'd prefer to have a single 6-channel amp, just to reduce wiring complexity, etc - especially since that is the area where I'm most "challenged" (doing a nice clean physical install)...

Any heat-related issues when installing an amp in the spare-tire area of these Challengers? I mean there would be virtually no airflow since that area is "closed in" all of the time. This *is* a class D amp, which should help keep heat levels down (from my understanding), but still - I'm a little concerned about them being so enclosed...

Thoughts on this amp and/or the mounting it (and the DSR1) in the spare-tire area?

Thank you!
 

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I can completely understand that - and am used to dealing with stuff like that when replaceing stock speakers with aftermarket speakers, but the whole "screws are too long" issue with the 6.5" rear-deck speakers was annoying - that should not happen when all of the parts are coming from the speaker manufacturer, in the same box. :)
Agreed, and its particularly frustrating because when the screws are so long it makes you think that you must have put something together wrong. You end up taking it apart and trying different things before you realize that its just messed up. I think I ended up dremeling the screws to length.
 
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