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I wanted to start a new upgrade thread for the Alpine 6-speaker amplified system (276 watt amplifier). This will contain lots of details that I either couldn't find in other threads or found conflicting information in other threads. At the very least, it will put all of the information in a single post. This is NOT an installation "how to" though - there are some other really good posts for that already. Although, I do include some noted about specific issues I ran into with the speakers I used and some solutions/work-arounds.

I wanted to get a few things out of the way before I start. First, as best as I can tell, the amplified Alpine system appears to be using a 6-channel amp. I believe that the radio feeds the amp with 4-channel audio and then the amp outputs 6-channel audio to 6 different speakers. The dash speakers only play mids/highs, the door speakers only play bass and the rear-deck speakers seem to play full audio. However, I cannot be 100% sure of this - this is just what I've gathered based on the Chilton wiring diagrams and the fact that there doesn't seem to be any "in-line" capacitors or crossovers.

First off, let's start with what speakers the systems comes with from the factory...

Stock Speakers
Front Dash
: 3.5" paper-cone midrange/tweeters - ~2.5 ohm
Doors: 6"x9" bass speakers - ~2.5 ohm
Rear Deck: 6.5" midrange speakers - ~2 ohm

So all factory speakers are between ~2 ohm and ~2.5 ohm (measured with multimeter). The 3.5" dash speakers are the only speakers that use a cheap paper cone. All speakers are single-cone speakers. There are no actual tweeters or any 2-way speakers from the factory.


Speaker Polarity
Before I replaced the door speakers, I bought a simple $12 speaker polarity tester. Since I was seeing conflicting information about which speaker wire adapters to use, I wanted to be 100% sure the polarity was correct as I replaced the speakers. For example, some threads said you needed the Metra 10-050 adapters while others said they used the Metra 72-6514 adapters. Both of these adapters will "fit", but they are reverse in terms of polarity.

So after I replaced the first door speaker using the 10-050 adapter that Crutchfield sent with them, I tested the polarity and found that it was reversed! So then I checked the other door, which still had the stock speaker and is was normal polarity. That tells me that the 10-050 is the wrong adapter to use for the doors in the Challenger - we should actually be using 72-6514 for the doors.

Then, before I went any further, I tested the polarity of the dash speakers - and found that both the stock speaker with no adapter and the aftermarket Infinity speaker with adapter were reverse polarity! So is seems that the dash speakers come from the factory setup for reverse-polarity.

Then I checked the stock rear-deck speakers - they were normal polarity. However, the door and rear-deck speaker wiring is "flipped" - so you actually need different speaker adapters for the doors and rear deck in order to keep the polarity correct on both (this is all confirmed in the Chilton wiring diagrams as well).

Here are the correct speaker adapters needed for my 2018 Challenger (in order to retain the polarity of all speakers as they come from the factory):

Dash: Metra 71-039c (old) or 72-7902 (new)
Door: Metra 72-6514
Rear-Deck: Metra 71-050


Replacement Speakers
I went with the following replacement speakers:

Front Dash: Infinity Reference REF-3032cfx - 3.5" two-way speakers - ~3.5 ohm
Doors: Infinity Reference REF-9632ix - 6"x9" two-way speakers - ~3.5 ohm
Rear Deck: Infinity Reference REF-6532ex - 6.5" two-way speakers - ~3.5 ohm

The dash speakers installed without issue.

The door speaker would not fit in the stock speaker mounting bracket that Dodge uses to attach the speaker to the door - the Infinity speaker basket hits into indentations on the mounting bracket that appear to send water away from the speakers. I have seen that others have "modified" the mounting bracket with a dremel to work around that issue. Personally, I wanted to avoid hacking up the stock mounting bracket, so what I did was to install the included spacer on the back of the speaker instead of on the front of it like most people do. So there was the speaker, the spacer and then the stock mounting bracket (see pic below). This pushed the Infinity speaker out a little further and made it fit in the stock mounting brackets without issue. It also allowed the stock speaker mounting bracket to offer better "protection" of the speaker since the back of the speaker doesn't stick out any further into the door than the stock speaker did (normally, since the aftermarket speaker is "deeper", more of it would stick out of the back of the stock speaker mounting bracket - it would actually stick out past the end of the bracket a little). Only problem was that the screws included with the speakers weren't long enough - but I found screws that came with the REF-6532ex speakers that worked perfectly.



The rear-deck speakers come with an adapter plate that is used to mount it. The stock speakers mount via a 3-screw system, whereas most speakers mount with 4 screws. So basically, you attach the adapter plate to the speaker first via 4 screws - and then that whole adapter/speaker assembly attches to the rear deck using the 3 stock mounting holes on the rear-deck. However, this didn't work out so well... The screws that they give you to attach the speaker to the adapter plate are a little too long - so when you install the adapter plate onto the speaker, the pointy screws stick out on the bottom of the adapter plate, which then "interfere" with rear deck when you try to install the adapter/speaker assembly onto the rear deck (the tips of the screws hit the rear deck metal, not allowing it to sit flush on the rear deck)! You would actually need to drill holes in the rear deck to use things as-is. I ended up just "shortening" the screws with a dremel (all 8 of them), which allowed the adapter plate to sit flush on the rear deck for proper mounting. No idea how others have been handling this issue. Was very frustrating, to be honest - especially since Crutchfield lists these speakers as fitting properly. Between that and the wrong speaker wire adapters they provided for the doors, I was a under-impressed with Crutchfield. One of the reasons I buy from them is to hopefully avoid issues like this... I will let me know my findings though.

I also bought some "Fast Rings" to use for the door and rear-deck speaker install (first time trying them). Honestly, I'm not so sure they are worth it, at least for this car. They come with 3 parts - a "backing" part that is supposed to attach to the outside door panel behind the door speaker, a foam ring to use between the speaker and the door mount and a larger foam ring that goes around the whole speaker itself to "seal" the area between the front of the speaker and the door speaker grille. I didn't use the "backing" part since there was something in the way behind the speaker (and I was concerned about it retaining water). I didn't use the ring that is supposed to go between the speaker and the door (just didn't make sense in this install). I did, however, use the largest ring to help seal the speaker and the door panel so that less sound "escapes" into the door. Not sure how much of a difference it makes. I used that same larger ring for the rear- deck speakers as well, but again, no idea how much difference it makes. Not sure they are worth the $20 cost for each set of fast rings...


Results
I did not buy all of the speakers at once. I bought them here and there when they were on sale and when I had the money.

I upgraded the 3.5" dash speakers first. The Infinity speakers had much higher-quality cone materials and were two-way speakers instead of a single-cone paper speaker. The dash speaker upgrades made a pretty noticeable improvement including much better highs. In my opinion, the stock dash speakers should have included dedicated tweeters from the factory.

A few weeks later, I upgraded the 6"x9" door speakers. I was expecting cheap paper-cone speakers based on what I found in the dash, but the door speakers were much better made and used a higher-quality (non-paper) material for the speaker cone. The door speaker upgrades gave me deeper, less-boomy bass. I even noticed that my side mirrors vibrated more with the Infinity 6x9's. However, I found that I had to turn the bass up a little more since they were less "boomy"- but the end result is deeper, more accurate bass.

Then, a few days later, I upgraded the 6.5" rear deck speakers. Again, I found that the stock rear-deck speakers were made with decent materials and had a decent weight to them. I actually think that the stock speakers weighed more than the Infinity speakers that I replaced them with - even the magnet was slightly bigger on the stock speakers. However, that being said, the rear-deck speaker upgrades provided the biggest difference of them all! The stock speakers were barely noticeable, even when I faded the sound to the rear a little. With the Infinity speakers, I had way more sound from the rear - and highs that just didn't exist from the rear at all before. I actually had to fade the sound towards the front a little to avoid having the rear-deck speakers overwhelm the front speakers! Huge, huge difference. They also seem to add to the overall bass a little as well.

After replacing all speakers, I had to adjust the EQ and fader settings substantially. Typically, I would have bass at +3, mids at 0 or +1 and treble at +2 or +3. With the Infinity speakers, I have bass +4, mid -2 and treble -2. However, I have only spent a small amount of time in the car since replacing the door and rear-deck speakers, so the EQ and fade settings may change over time as the speakers break-in and I spend a little more time with them. The overall sound definitely got way brighter - especially when the rear-deck speakers were replaced.


What's Next
Honestly, I don't feel that I have enough control over the sound with simple bass/mid/treble and a fader control. I think that I will eventually be bypassing the stock amp and using some type of processor and external amp(s) in the near future. Right now, I'm leaning towards a Rockford Fosgate DSR1 w/t-harness and some external amps - not sure if I want to go with a a single 6-channel amp for speakers and a separate monoblock amp for a sub or multiple amps (such as a 4 channel amp for front speakers and 3 channel for rear speakers + amp). But ultimately, I want more control over each channel, such as being able to adjust crossover points for each speaker, better EQ and separate gain control for dash, door and rear-deck speakers. I think that the stock amp is EQ'ing based on the limited power of the stock amp and the limitations of the stock speakers - and that I can get MUCH better sound quality if I am able to modify the crossovers, EQ and gain on my own, separately for each channel. Of course, doing that is going to cost me lots of $$$ and time. :) A little at a time though...

I would love to get some input on peoples experience with the DSR1 and what amps you would recommend. Originally, I wasn't planning on going this far, but don't think I'd be happy with a simple 4-channel amp with only bass/mid/treble and fader controls. I need more control. :)


Resources
Chilton Wiring Diagrams
:
Site: https://www.roswell-nm.gov/1112/Chilton-Auto-Repair-Library
Select Repair -> Wiring Diagrams -> Components -> Speaker to see speaker wiriing diagrams

Speaker Polarity Testing Tool (highly recommended!):
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07MQ55QHL/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 (available many places, but can get "free" 1-day shipping with Prime.
I did fast rings and some road kill sound deadening in the doors and it made a big improvement. There are some bad frequency issues without it. I went with the Kenwood dsp and infinity speakers with a kicker 12" enclosure. Huge, huge improvement. I used an rta and a mic to tune, without doing this it will still sound mediocre. So even if going with the dsr1 you should study up and try to tune with a mono pink noise track. Don't jump to music and tune, stick to the noise track and reign in those frequencies. It will be worth your effort I know because the first time around I didn't understand crossover and slope very well and ended up jumping to music after a bit and it wasn't very good at all. Started over and now it just flat out kicks ass.
 

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I did fast rings and some road kill sound deadening in the doors and it made a big improvement. There are some bad frequency issues without it. I went with the Kenwood dsp and infinity speakers with a kicker 12" enclosure. Huge, huge improvement. I used an rta and a mic to tune, without doing this it will still sound mediocre. So even if going with the dsr1 you should study up and try to tune with a mono pink noise track. Don't jump to music and tune, stick to the noise track and reign in those frequencies. It will be worth your effort I know because the first time around I didn't understand crossover and slope very well and ended up jumping to music after a bit and it wasn't very good at all. Started over and now it just flat out kicks ass.
Also, when I switched to Infinity on the factory amp they were extremely bright in a bad way and mid range was almost non existent. Windows down forget it, not good. After switching to the Kenwood problem solved. That extreme brightness was gone even before tuning.
 

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Discussion Starter #123 (Edited)
I did fast rings and some road kill sound deadening in the doors and it made a big improvement. There are some bad frequency issues without it. I went with the Kenwood dsp and infinity speakers with a kicker 12" enclosure. Huge, huge improvement. I used an rta and a mic to tune, without doing this it will still sound mediocre. So even if going with the dsr1 you should study up and try to tune with a mono pink noise track. Don't jump to music and tune, stick to the noise track and reign in those frequencies. It will be worth your effort I know because the first time around I didn't understand crossover and slope very well and ended up jumping to music after a bit and it wasn't very good at all. Started over and now it just flat out kicks ass.
Yeah, I originally tried tuning using an Android tablet, the $20 Dayton Audio "headphone jack" MIC and the Android AudioTool amp (RTA software). However, after getting nowhere fast, I eventually found that every Android device I used would give me drastically different results even using the same MIC (I think maybe they have some sort of auto-gain features or something).

So I was eventually convinced to use REW to tune. I actually purchased the MiniDSP umik1 USB mic (~$100 shipped) to use with REW. Now I'm just trying to get the hang of REW and hope to actually start tuning this weekend. It's been so freaking hot here, that there is no way I can sit in a non-running car with the windows up for any significant amount of time - so hopefully this weekend, I can get up early enough before it gets hot out and actually get this thing tuned. Right now, it's listenable, but I know it can be SO much better when properly tuned.

I'm curious - what did you set your crossovers at? I think I currently have my 6x9 door speakers setup with a HP of 55hz and a LP of 450hz and the dash 3.5" speakers setup with a HP of 450hz (24db Linkwintz Riley). Just curious what you have your set to...

I'll eventually sound-deaden at least my doors and rear-deck, but I need to get a passenger-side power-window issue looked at before i mess with that (should have had that issue looked at long ago).

Thanks.

EDIT: Also, I have a JBL under-the-seat sub that I'm going to install this weekend. Not interested in full-sized subs in the trunk at all, but an under-the-seat sub will still at least help the bottom end out some. I have one in my other car and it actually does a pretty damn good job. Right now, I'm running sub-less in the Challenger.
 

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Yeah, I originally tried tuning using an Android tablet, the $20 Dayton Audio "headphone jack" MIC and the Android AudioTool amp (RTA software). However, after getting nowhere fast, I eventually found that every Android device I used would give me drastically different results even using the same MIC (I think maybe they have some sort of auto-gain features or something).

So I was eventually convinced to use REW to tune. I actually purchased the MiniDSP umik1 USB mic (~$100 shipped) to use with REW. Now I'm just trying to get the hang of REW and hope to actually start tuning this weekend. It's been so freaking hot here, that there is no way I can sit in a non-running car with the windows up for any significant amount of time - so hopefully this weekend, I can get up early enough before it gets hot out and actually get this thing tuned. Right now, it's listenable, but I know it can be SO much better when properly tuned.

I'm curious - what did you set your crossovers at? I think I currently have my 6x9 door speakers setup with a HP of 55hz and a LP of 450hz and the dash 3.5" speakers setup with a HP of 450hz (24db Linkwintz Riley). Just curious what you have your set to...

I'll eventually sound-deaden at least my doors and rear-deck, but I need to get a passenger-side power-window issue looked at before i mess with that (should have had that issue looked at long ago).

Thanks.

EDIT: Also, I have a JBL under-the-seat sub that I'm going to install this weekend. Not interested in full-sized subs in the trunk at all, but an under-the-seat sub will still at least help the bottom end out some. I have one in my other car and it actually does a pretty damn good job. Right now, I'm running sub-less in the Challenger.
I did the same thing, Audiotool and the Dayton mic but I installed Blue Stacks android emulator on my laptop to run Audiotool. It worked well for me but I think it was because I was armed with more knowledge. I decided it was best with our cars to somewhat follow hiw the factory setup is. I low passed the doors at 87hz and high passed at 196. The dash high passed at 196. The reason I did the dash that way is because Infinity supplies caps for 3022cfx which crosses at 196. For the dash I use the Linkwitz-Riley -24 slope like you did. For the doors the Kenwood won't let you use that same slope for band pass so I was stuck with -12 Buttersworth. I set the sub at 69hz using Linkwitz-Riley -24 slope also. I read that slope is more forgiving for listener position and helps avoid phase issues. I crossed over my sub lower than the doors because my parametric 3 band only has peak type filtering ( Q ) instead of shelf type. Otherwise I could cross at 87 and adjust the Q at 100 to keep the frequencies from forming a valley at the cross over point. So then I adjusted the mid and bass parametric bands for the sub to smooth the curve around the cross over frequencies. Same thing on the doors with using the Q and frequency focus to control the rta curve. I did have some crazy 13 band eq cuts and boosts to form my curve. With my bass tuning I don't have much localization meaning it's hard to tell exactly where the bass is coming from which is what you want. I eliminated the 3.5 speakers in the back seat. They are completely unnecessary and to much sound and high frequencies in the back will mess with your front staging in a negative way. I crossed over the rear deck at 87hz -24 slope and cut the gain by 2 db so not to draw the front staging to the back. I can tell they are there but barely. Also, I made sure I measured the distance from the listing driver position to the center of the speaker grills and added the depth from the grills to the voice coils to that measurement. I used the speaker depth on the Infinity paper work to guesstimate. This made a big improvement from my first try measurements. I sound deadened my entire trunk originally to help control drone since I don't have exhaust resonators. Did the same thing under the rear seat and the rear deck. I used a Frost King product from Homedepot that's meant for rapping home duct work. It's a foil back stick on foam. Much cheaper and since then I saw an episode of Garage Squad on Motortrend where they used the exact same product to sound deaden the floor of the car they were fixing, that was a trip.
 

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I did the same thing, Audiotool and the Dayton mic but I installed Blue Stacks android emulator on my laptop to run Audiotool. It worked well for me but I think it was because I was armed with more knowledge. I decided it was best with our cars to somewhat follow hiw the factory setup is. I low passed the doors at 87hz and high passed at 196. The dash high passed at 196. The reason I did the dash that way is because Infinity supplies caps for 3022cfx which crosses at 196. For the dash I use the Linkwitz-Riley -24 slope like you did. For the doors the Kenwood won't let you use that same slope for band pass so I was stuck with -12 Buttersworth. I set the sub at 69hz using Linkwitz-Riley -24 slope also. I read that slope is more forgiving for listener position and helps avoid phase issues. I crossed over my sub lower than the doors because my parametric 3 band only has peak type filtering ( Q ) instead of shelf type. Otherwise I could cross at 87 and adjust the Q at 100 to keep the frequencies from forming a valley at the cross over point. So then I adjusted the mid and bass parametric bands for the sub to smooth the curve around the cross over frequencies. Same thing on the doors with using the Q and frequency focus to control the rta curve. I did have some crazy 13 band eq cuts and boosts to form my curve. With my bass tuning I don't have much localization meaning it's hard to tell exactly where the bass is coming from which is what you want. I eliminated the 3.5 speakers in the back seat. They are completely unnecessary and to much sound and high frequencies in the back will mess with your front staging in a negative way. I crossed over the rear deck at 87hz -24 slope and cut the gain by 2 db so not to draw the front staging to the back. I can tell they are there but barely. Also, I made sure I measured the distance from the listing driver position to the center of the speaker grills and added the depth from the grills to the voice coils to that measurement. I used the speaker depth on the Infinity paper work to guesstimate. This made a big improvement from my first try measurements. I sound deadened my entire trunk originally to help control drone since I don't have exhaust resonators. Did the same thing under the rear seat and the rear deck. I used a Frost King product from Homedepot that's meant for rapping home duct work. It's a foil back stick on foam. Much cheaper and since then I saw an episode of Garage Squad on Motortrend where they used the exact same product to sound deaden the floor of the car they were fixing, that was a trip.
Oh, I did find that some android tablets/devices won't use the mic. I tried to use this cheap tablet my wife has from tmobile and I could not get it to use the mic. Does work on my laptop and my Galaxy S9. And I loaded the calibration file for my mic. Worked very well.
 

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Discussion Starter #126
It's funny - even though I can get the $20 MIC to work on all of the Android devices I've tried, I would get VERY differernt results from different devices. I know for sure it was using the IMM-6 (and not one of the devices internal MICs), but liek I said, results were very differernt between devices - and I had no idea which one was actually correct. That's when i said "screw it" and went with REW and a USB mic. I was tired of spending over an hour EQ'ing each speaker only to get a horrible sounding system - most likely because the device was not reporting correct information!

I must say though, REW definitely is a lot cooler than AudioTool! :) Just the way it averages readings and performs smoothing, etc is awesome. It will even tell you exactly what freqs need adjusted on your parametric EQ, including Q values and everything! I'm really looking forward to actually tuning with it now.

Even though I installed the capacitor included with the 3.5" Infinity dash speakers, when I mis-configured the crossovers in my DSP, I definitely heard some "bad" vibration sounds from the 3.5" speakers at louder volumes, which is why wanted to cross them over much higher than the capactior frequency. 450hz may be too high though - not sure. I just figured the door speakers would be better at reproducing the 200-450hz than the little 3.5" speakers would.

Also - FYI - the dash speakers are wired with reverse polarity from the factory - so if you used the speaker harness adapters when replacing the dash speakers and haven't corrected them for polarity, they are probably reverse polarity (not sure if your DSP allows you to swap polarity or not). Someone else over on DIYMA also confirmed that they are, in fact, reverse-polarity from the factory. And depending on what speaker adapter harnesses you used for the doors, they could be reverse polarity too (the ones crutchfield gives you are wrong for the doors). You may already know all of this, but just FYI in case....
 

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It's funny - even though I can get the $20 MIC to work on all of the Android devices I've tried, I would get VERY differernt results from different devices. I know for sure it was using the IMM-6 (and not one of the devices internal MICs), but liek I said, results were very differernt between devices - and I had no idea which one was actually correct. That's when i said "screw it" and went with REW and a USB mic. I was tired of spending over an hour EQ'ing each speaker only to get a horrible sounding system - most likely because the device was not reporting correct information!

I must say though, REW definitely is a lot cooler than AudioTool! :) Just the way it averages readings and performs smoothing, etc is awesome. It will even tell you exactly what freqs need adjusted on your parametric EQ, including Q values and everything! I'm really looking forward to actually tuning with it now.

Even though I installed the capacitor included with the 3.5" Infinity dash speakers, when I mis-configured the crossovers in my DSP, I definitely heard some "bad" vibration sounds from the 3.5" speakers at louder volumes, which is why wanted to cross them over much higher than the capactior frequency. 450hz may be too high though - not sure. I just figured the door speakers would be better at reproducing the 200-450hz than the little 3.5" speakers would.

Also - FYI - the dash speakers are wired with reverse polarity from the factory - so if you used the speaker harness adapters when replacing the dash speakers and haven't corrected them for polarity, they are probably reverse polarity (not sure if your DSP allows you to swap polarity or not). Someone else over on DIYMA also confirmed that they are, in fact, reverse-polarity from the factory. And depending on what speaker adapter harnesses you used for the doors, they could be reverse polarity too (the ones crutchfield gives you are wrong for the doors). You may already know all of this, but just FYI in case....
I found that both door speakers and the drivers side rear deck factory speakers were reversed. I corrected that by pinning out the mantra adapters so that I'm still hooking up black and white correctly to the speakers. I would not have used the capacitors on the speakers though since you can control that with your dsp. I think if the cross overs sound good to you than it must be right. I noticed you used the 6532ex speakers in the back. When I first swapped speakers I used 6522ex because Crutchfield says 6522ix won't fit. That is 100% incorrect by the way. On the factory amp I couldn't stand them, just grating and annoying sounding. I switched to 6522ix and was night and day, much better sounding speaker. I might try changing the crossover between the dash and door at some point just to see. I did play with a bit but dialed in easier with how I have it. The 3.5s aren't distorted in my setup but originally had them crossed just below 400 with the doors in high pass at 55hz. Didn't work good because the highs I think between the two sets were phasing out. I'm going to look into REW now though.
 

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Discussion Starter #128
The main reason that I installed the caps on the 3.5" speakers was becuase I replaced the stock speakers long before I switched to an aftermarket amp and DSP system. However, it's not a bad idea to keep them install even after adding a DSP, just in case you screw up a setting on the DSP and accidently send full signals to the dash speaker channels or something. Most audio places actually recommend the caps as a "safety net".

Although, being that I can now just set the high-pass physically on my JL Audio amp, which would act as my "safety net" (instead of the cap), I'll probably eventually pull the dash speakers, re-pin the speaker adapters so they are not reverse polairy and remove the caps. Right now, I'm just swappling polarity via the DSP, but I'd rather the DSP show the true polarity instead of having to remember to reverse polarity to get correct polarity. :)

Right now, the system is lisetenable, but it's definitely not right. Looking forward to installing the under-the-seat sub and getting the entire system tuned properly (probably this weekend) - I'm sure it will sound a LOT better.
 

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The main reason that I installed the caps on the 3.5" speakers was becuase I replaced the stock speakers long before I switched to an aftermarket amp and DSP system. However, it's not a bad idea to keep them install even after adding a DSP, just in case you screw up a setting on the DSP and accidently send full signals to the dash speaker channels or something. Most audio places actually recommend the caps as a "safety net".

Although, being that I can now just set the high-pass physically on my JL Audio amp, which would act as my "safety net" (instead of the cap), I'll probably eventually pull the dash speakers, re-pin the speaker adapters so they are not reverse polairy and remove the caps. Right now, I'm just swappling polarity via the DSP, but I'd rather the DSP show the true polarity instead of having to remember to reverse polarity to get correct polarity. :)

Right now, the system is lisetenable, but it's definitely not right. Looking forward to installing the under-the-seat sub and getting the entire system tuned properly (probably this weekend) - I'm sure it will sound a LOT better.
True, good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #131
So I just installed an under-the-seat subwoofer in my 2018 Challenger GT. I wanted a sub to help with the bottom end, but didn't want some big sub box in the trunk. I like having the trunk space available and also like having the ability to fold down the rear seats in case I need to haul something that won't fit in the trunk. After all, my GT is a year-round daily-driver - and trunk space is important - especially if travelling with the family.

Device
I ended up going with the JBL BassPro SL. It's a 125W RMS, 8" powered subwoofer. The reasons for going with this particular model is becuase of it's size (very slim) and some of the best reviews for sound quality. There are definitely cheaper under-the-seat subs available, but the JBL strikes a good mix of cost and performance. I also liked how all of the connections and controls were on the long side of the device - which will help with installation.​

JBL BassPro SL



Installation
The BassPro SL is only 2-7/8" high, which is one of the thinnest you can find - and it just barely fits under the passenger seat in terms of height. Anything over 3" high would not fit properly. As it is now, even with the JBL, when you put the passenger seat all of the way back, there is a metal bar on the bottom of the seat that does come in contact with the enclosure. So far, it doesn't seem to cause any issues, even with the seat all of the way back (which mine never is), but it's that close - and definitely something to keep in mind if you are looking to add an under-the-seat sub to your Challenger.

I could have put it under the drivers seat since the drivers seat height is adjustable (and is usually not at the lowest setting for me), but then if someone else were to drive my car and lower the power seat all of the way, or even if I lowered it too far by accident, it could get ugly. :) I didn't want to risk that, which is why I put it under the passenger seat - which is NOT height-adjustable.

The only other issue is that the under-the-seat HVAC vents are VERY close to the enclosure and will blow directly onto the sub - and block the air from flowing to the back seats very well (although, there are vents on the console and under the drivers seat as well). I don't expect this will be an issue. In fact, in may even help keep the sub cool in the summber and warm in the winter. :)

I'm not going to lie - installation was a lot of work. I had to remove the passenger seat and run power and signal wires to the trunk - but i wanted to do it right, without any visible wires or anything like that. I ran the power wires down the passenger side (right along with the main factory power wire) and ran the signal wires down the passenger side (to help avoid any potential noise issues).

Also, since the controls and wiring are on the "long" side of the enclosure, I installed it with that side towards the front of the car. The is beneficial in a few ways:
1. You can install the enclosure "long-ways", which means that it doesn't inpact the footing area of any rear seat passengers at all.
2. Even if a rear passenger did hit it with their feet, there is no wiring or controls that thay can interfere with.
3. The wiring comes out of the enclosure and goes right into a "split" in the cars carpeting, which works out perfeclty - especially becuase there is a factory ground location right there behind that split in the carpeting! Worked out really well. I did keep the cables long enough that I can pull the sub back in the rear passenger footing area in case I needed to for some reason. When pushed back under the seat, the slack in the cables can go rinto into that factory "Split" in the carpeting to hide it again.

Most of the under-the-seat subs have the controls and wiring on the "short" side of the rectangular enclosure, which, depending on the sub measurements, may means that it's needs to be installed "long-ways" and would interfere with the rear passenger foor area (would stick out furhter) - or, if you could install it long-ways, the wiring and controls would be on the sides, which wouldn't work as well as how the JBL is setup.

I purchased an NEP 8AWG OFC amp install kit for the wiring. It contains "over-sized" 8AWG OFC power and ground wires, gold-pated connectors for the sub and battery side, OFC RCA signal cable, a fuse holder (which I didn't use) and even some speaker wire, which I also didn't use. The manual says 12 gauge or thicker, but since my power wire run was going to be ~10 ft. long, I didn't want to risk having wire that was not thick enough - plus I can always upgrade to a more powerful sub now if I wanted to. The enclousre has a built-in 15amp fuse and they recommend a 20amp fuse at the battery. I actually used a 6AWG bussman inline MAXI fuse-holder. This was by far the highest quality fuse holder of this type, which is really easy to install (doesn't have to be bolted down anywhere). Most of the fuse holders of this type will advertise 8AWG wiring, but the actual wiring is only 10 or 12 gauge. Since I ran "over-sized" 8 AWG wiring, I wanted something more comparable to it for the fuse holder - the 6 AWG wiring in this fuse holder is very close in size to the "over-sized" 8AWG power wiring I used, so it worked out perfecty​


Bussman 6AWG Maxi fuse-holder


NEP 8AWG OFC Amp Install Kit



Performance
I've only used it VERY briefly so far, but it's amazing how much deep bass this thing puts out!!. No, it's not going to compete with a big box with "dual 12's" in the trunk, connected to a 1000W RMS amp - but I wasn't looking for anything like that. Also, being that it's right next to you in the passenger compartment, it doesn't require as much power as a sub that's all of the way in the trunk, with the back seat completely blocking it's sound.

I haven't tuned it at all yet, but just with the initial "guesswork" I did with the settings, I still have plenty of gain left on the sub itself and currently have it turned down -8db on my DSP and so far, it easily keeps up with my 75Wx6 RMS amp for the regular speakers. Very impressive for an 8" sub that is under 3" in height - and I don't have it running anywhere near "max".​
 

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So I just installed an under-the-seat subwoofer in my 2018 Challenger GT. I wanted a sub to help with the bottom end, but didn't want some big sub box in the trunk. I like having the trunk space available and also like having the ability to fold down the rear seats in case I need to haul something that won't fit in the trunk. After all, my GT is a year-round daily-driver - and trunk space is important - especially if travelling with the family.

Device
I ended up going with the JBL BassPro SL. It's a 125W RMS, 8" powered subwoofer. The reasons for going with this particular model is becuase of it's size (very slim) and some of the best reviews for sound quality. There are definitely cheaper under-the-seat subs available, but the JBL strikes a good mix of cost and performance. I also liked how all of the connections and controls were on the long side of the device - which will help with installation.​

JBL BassPro SL



Installation
The BassPro SL is only 2-7/8" high, which is one of the thinnest you can find - and it just barely fits under the passenger seat in terms of height. Anything over 3" high would not fit properly. As it is now, even with the JBL, when you put the passenger seat all of the way back, there is a metal bar on the bottom of the seat that does come in contact with the enclosure. So far, it doesn't seem to cause any issues, even with the seat all of the way back (which mine never is), but it's that close - and definitely something to keep in mind if you are looking to add an under-the-seat sub to your Challenger.​
I could have put it under the drivers seat since the drivers seat height is adjustable (and is usually not at the lowest setting for me), but then if someone else were to drive my car and lower the power seat all of the way, or even if I lowered it too far by accident, it could get ugly. :) I didn't want to risk that, which is why I put it under the passenger seat - which is NOT height-adjustable.​
The only other issue is that the under-the-seat HVAC vents are VERY close to the enclosure and will blow directly onto the sub - and block the air from flowing to the back seats very well (although, there are vents on the console and under the drivers seat as well). I don't expect this will be an issue. In fact, in may even help keep the sub cool in the summber and warm in the winter. :)
I'm not going to lie - installation was a lot of work. I had to remove the passenger seat and run power and signal wires to the trunk - but i wanted to do it right, without any visible wires or anything like that. I ran the power wires down the passenger side (right along with the main factory power wire) and ran the signal wires down the passenger side (to help avoid any potential noise issues).​
Also, since the controls and wiring are on the "long" side of the enclosure, I installed it with that side towards the front of the car. The is beneficial in a few ways:​
1. You can install the enclosure "long-ways", which means that it doesn't inpact the footing area of any rear seat passengers at all.​
2. Even if a rear passenger did hit it with their feet, there is no wiring or controls that thay can interfere with.​
3. The wiring comes out of the enclosure and goes right into a "split" in the cars carpeting, which works out perfeclty - especially becuase there is a factory ground location right there behind that split in the carpeting! Worked out really well. I did keep the cables long enough that I can pull the sub back in the rear passenger footing area in case I needed to for some reason. When pushed back under the seat, the slack in the cables can go rinto into that factory "Split" in the carpeting to hide it again.​
Most of the under-the-seat subs have the controls and wiring on the "short" side of the rectangular enclosure, which, depending on the sub measurements, may means that it's needs to be installed "long-ways" and would interfere with the rear passenger foor area (would stick out furhter) - or, if you could install it long-ways, the wiring and controls would be on the sides, which wouldn't work as well as how the JBL is setup.​
I purchased an NEP 8AWG OFC amp install kit for the wiring. It contains "over-sized" 8AWG OFC power and ground wires, gold-pated connectors for the sub and battery side, OFC RCA signal cable, a fuse holder (which I didn't use) and even some speaker wire, which I also didn't use. The manual says 12 gauge or thicker, but since my power wire run was going to be ~10 ft. long, I didn't want to risk having wire that was not thick enough - plus I can always upgrade to a more powerful sub now if I wanted to. The enclousre has a built-in 15amp fuse and they recommend a 20amp fuse at the battery. I actually used a 6AWG bussman inline MAXI fuse-holder. This was by far the highest quality fuse holder of this type, which is really easy to install (doesn't have to be bolted down anywhere). Most of the fuse holders of this type will advertise 8AWG wiring, but the actual wiring is only 10 or 12 gauge. Since I ran "over-sized" 8 AWG wiring, I wanted something more comparable to it for the fuse holder - the 6 AWG wiring in this fuse holder is very close in size to the "over-sized" 8AWG power wiring I used, so it worked out perfecty​

Bussman 6AWG Maxi fuse-holder
NEP 8AWG OFC Amp Install Kit
Performance
I've only used it VERY briefly so far, but it's amazing how much deep bass this thing puts out!!. No, it's not going to compete with a big box with "dual 12's" in the trunk, connected to a 1000W RMS amp - but I wasn't looking for anything like that. Also, being that it's right next to you in the passenger compartment, it doesn't require as much power as a sub that's all of the way in the trunk, with the back seat completely blocking it's sound.​
I haven't tuned it at all yet, but just with the initial "guesswork" I did with the settings, I still have plenty of gain left on the sub itself and currently have it turned down -8db on my DSP and so far, it easily keeps up with my 75Wx6 RMS amp for the regular speakers. Very impressive for an 8" sub that is under 3" in height - and I don't have it running anywhere near "max".​
Very nice! I would say just about any sub solution is better than one in the rear window deck. That is a horrible place in our cars.
 

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That looks like a nice component, I am considering something like that for under the seat of my El Camino. Thanks for the write up.
 

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jtrosky - THANK YOU SIR! Today I installed the same rear speakers you listed in the beginning of this thread in my new 2019 GT Plus with the same Alpine setup. WHAT A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE! Before most of my music would be on 26-28 to sound good - 18-20 is now not only enough but sounds better as well. I picked up the speakers on Amazon for $55 and it's transformed the audio in the car. I can't thank you enough!
 

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Discussion Starter #135
jtrosky - THANK YOU SIR! Today I installed the same rear speakers you listed in the beginning of this thread in my new 2019 GT Plus with the same Alpine setup. WHAT A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE! Before most of my music would be on 26-28 to sound good - 18-20 is now not only enough but sounds better as well. I picked up the speakers on Amazon for $55 and it's transformed the audio in the car. I can't thank you enough!
Awesome - glad to hear that you had success with it! Personally, my tastes have been "evolving" a little when it comes to audio in the car. I used to actually like fading the music towards the rear a little - now I'm more about getting the sound up front, with the rear speakers barely audible to me in the front seat. Just different strokes for different folks. :)

Replacing the rear speakers in the 6-speaker amplified Alpine system most definitely makes them WAY "brighter" though, that's for sure - since the original stock speakers had no tweeter. Whether you like that difference is up to your personal preference.

I'm finding that getting a full aftermarket amp & DSP system properly set up is MUCH more involved that I had origianlly expected. :) Right now, I'm still struggling to get a "proper" tune. I can get things to sound great (to me) just by boosting bass and treble a little, like I would with a regular 5-band graphical EQ, but I keep being told that it will sound even better when properly tuned with the parametric EQ in the DSR-1 DSP. We'll see.... I'm still working on it. :) Learning a lot along the way though and having fun while doing it. Way more to learn that I ever anticipated, that's for sure!
 

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I bought a new 2019 Scat Pack 2 days ago and just ordered these speakers. The stock stereo sounds better than I expected but the top treble just isn't there and the bass is a little mushy. I'm hoping upgrading the speakers will be enough to satisfy me considering the exhaust is the main music I listen to.

Thanks for your experimentation. If I end up adding the DSR-1, amps, and a sub I won't blame you, I promise. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #137 (Edited)
I bought a new 2019 Scat Pack 2 days ago and just ordered these speakers. The stock stereo sounds better than I expected but the top treble just isn't there and the bass is a little mushy. I'm hoping upgrading the speakers will be enough to satisfy me considering the exhaust is the main music I listen to.

Thanks for your experimentation. If I end up adding the DSR-1, amps, and a sub I won't blame you, I promise. :)
To me, upgrading the dash speakers is probably the best upgrade - simply becuase the stock dash speakers don't have a tweeter. So by replaceing them with an actual 2-way 3.5" speaker like the Infinity, you'll get much better treble response. I think the dash speakers were probably the best in terms of upgraded sound quality. The bass will also be "tighter" with the replacement door speakers. Less boomy.

I really do recommend the under-seat sub. It totally transforms the bass response. :) You just don't realize how much actual bass you're missing without a sub (plus it takes a lot of stress off of the 6x9 door speakers, letting them do their job better). I've been really impressed with how much bass that little 8" under-seat sub produces! Obviously, you'll get deeper bass from "real" subwoofers that go in the trunk, but if you don't want to go that far (real subs, sub box, sub amp, etc), that little JBL under-seat sub is pretty damn impressive for what it is.
 

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Oh I know a sub is a different experience. I put over $3K into new audio in my Highlander to make it more interesting to drive. :) An Audio Control DSP, JL Audio speakers and amp, and a 12" sub that can beat you senseless. The only change I'd make is to a 10" sub so I don't have bruises.

I don't want that expense or complexity in the Challenger so I hope upgrading the speakers is just enough to keep me from doing anything else. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #139
The biggest problem with the stock system in these cars is that they utilize some sort of DSP system in the stock amp to tune the system to the stock speakers - so when you replace the stock speakers, you really don't get to use them to their potential since there is no way to modify the factory DSP settings. You can fiddle with the bass/mid/treble controls, but they don't give you much flexibility.

So then you start thinking about getting an aftermarket DSP system and an aftermarket amp. Ah, but wait, you need a way to get the head-unit signals to the DSP first! At that point, you can either get the DSR-1 (cheap way), which provides a clean signal AND DSP or go with a PAC Audio AmpPro4 (more expensive way) to get a clean signal - but that way still requires a DSP, so then you spend another ~$800 for a DSP system. Then, of course, you still need the amp! There goes another $600+ (if you want a 6-channel amp). As you can see, it gets real expensive, real quick. Before you know it, you're into it for $2k+ and still have a lot of work to do just to get it sounding right! Although, it sounds like you've "been here, done that" before. :)

Honestly, the DSR-1 has it's flaws and limitations that you have to learn to work around. I've come to the conclusion that if money were no object, the PAC AmpPro 4 with an external DSP system would be a better solution, but it's also going to be a lot more expensive ($1200+ vs. ~$300). At that point, you need to make the decision just how far you want to go and how much money you want to invest. Yes, the AmpPro 4 with a MiniDSP or Helix DSP will be better, but like i said, it's also going to be a lot more expensive. Then, of course, you need a measurement MIC (~$100 for a USB mic), then you need to learn the REW software and finally you need to learn how to actually tune it all. Lots and lots of time and money invested!!

I origianlly went into this just so I get the stock system to be louder. I'm now deep down into the rabbit hole. :)
 

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But you are having fun and learning a lot, so that has its value in it's own right.
 
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