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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Per my research on 2019 Challengers:
Standard rear axle:
- V6/A8: 195MM 3.07
- 5.7/M6: 230MM 3.90 limited slip
- 5.7/A8: ???MM 3.07 conventional (could not find the size)
- 6.4/M6: 230MM 3.90 limited slip
- 6.4/A8: 230MM 3.06 limited slip

Optional rear axle:
- 5.7/A8: 3.06 230MM limited-slip (with the $1495 Performance Handling Group)

Questions:
- Is the standard axle behind a 5.7/A8 a 195MM like the V6 SXTs?
- Other than saving money, is there any compelling reason to not order the Perfromance Handling Group behind the 5.7/A8?

Performance Handling Group
 

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Questions:
- Is the standard axle behind a 5.7/A8 a 195MM like the V6 SXTs?
No, all V8 Challengers use the 230mm.

- Other than saving money, is there any compelling reason to not order the Perfromance Handling Group behind the 5.7/A8?
Agree, this package on the R/T is a must have.




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Questions:
- Is the standard axle behind a 5.7/A8 a 195MM like the V6 SXTs?
No, all V8 Challengers use the 230mm.

- Other than saving money, is there any compelling reason to not order the Perfromance Handling Group behind the 5.7/A8?
Agree, this package on the R/T is a must have.




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Yep, limited slip right from the factory is the way to go.

IMO, it should be standard, but at least it's available again as on option on the automatic 5.7 cars.
 

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I ordered my 2012 R/T new with automatic trans and added limited slip as an option at the time. It's a must on these cars in my opinion, since there is a lot more wheel hop and torsion of the body with the unibody construction and the independent rear suspension.

I have always had solid rear axle cars and would prefer that. The posi is a must.
 

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I ordered my 2012 R/T new with automatic trans and added limited slip as an option at the time. It's a must on these cars in my opinion, since there is a lot more wheel hop and torsion of the body with the unibody construction and the independent rear suspension.

I have always had solid rear axle cars and would prefer that. The posi is a must.
Good to see it offered again on the 5.7 A8's.

Having had both types over the years, I agree that it's a "must have", at least for me.

Good choice on your part.
 

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I think adding the limited slip option cost about $100 more at the time. Who would not do that?


I ordered Super Track Pack, but I don't think that package included limited slip diff. It was an a la carte add-on build option.
 

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Per my research on 2019 Challengers:
Standard rear axle:
  • V6/A8: 195MM 3.07
  • 5.7/M6: 230MM 3.90 limited slip
  • 5.7/A8: ???MM 3.07 conventional (could not find the size)
  • 6.4/M6: 230MM 3.90 limited slip
  • 6.4/A8: 230MM 3.06 limited slip
Optional rear axle:
- 5.7/A8: 3.06 230MM limited-slip (with the $1495 Performance Handling Group)

Questions:
  • Is the standard axle behind a 5.7/A8 a 195MM like the V6 SXTs?
  • Other than saving money, is there any compelling reason to not order the Perfromance Handling Group behind the 5.7/A8?
Performance Handling Group

The Perf Handling Group adds the 4 piston Brembo brakes the Scat Pack has as std equipment (Bilstein Shocks, higher rate springs) - the brakes would be $2.6k to add afterward.
 

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I might be a bit late to the party, but I want to sincerely thank the OP for sharing the information he found.

I haven't read this anywhere - and considering these are performance cars, supposedly engineered by enthusiasts, you would think that the nitty-gritty of the mechanicals should be found and comprehensible by anyone... nope apparently not.
Maybe the bean counters pulled it from advertising, or maybe the advertising department has not a single enthusiast amongst their numbers!?

The Canadian website/builder takes it one step further - to absolutely no mention of differential gearing what so ever!?

What I still cannot understand, is model year versus calender year;
As I type this, it's November 21st;
The conventional model year change over is September of the prior calender year;
So we should be in the 2020 model year right!?
Well the Canadian website (I'm pretty sure the cars are built here!?) allows me to build and price either a 2018 or 2019 - and I can only find 2019 PDF brochure...
The USA site at least allows me to select the 2020 model year - even though the default is a 2019.
The USA site offers a download of the 2019 brochure, but not 2020.|

I am pretty sure I'm seeing 2020 Challenger advertisements in my facebook feed... ??

EDIT: I just found these details in the fourty-seven page USA brochure, but they sure where not to be found in the eighteen page Canadian brochure... too bad there are regional option/equipment differences that I cannot glean from one or the other!
 

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3.09 is not a performance gear that I have ever heard of IMO however the 3.90 is a great gear for performance while still keeping some mileage at the same time. I have the 3.92 with a 2009 STR8 6 speed manual trans and I am thinking that something like 4.11 would be better. This is a heavy car and needs all the help it can get to get out of its own way. The extra 2 gears of overdrive would still keep the RPM down while cruising. Back in the day when I was a young man you could get the Camaro with a big block and the 4 speed with 4.11 gears. It had a low top end and poor mileage but did go quickly in a straight line on the 1320 and it was a light car compared to the Challenger. Go with the taller gear, you will not regret it. :)
 

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3.09 is not a performance gear that I have ever heard of IMO however the 3.90 is a great gear for performance while still keeping some mileage at the same time. I have the 3.92 with a 2009 STR8 6 speed manual trans and I am thinking that something like 4.11 would be better. This is a heavy car and needs all the help it can get to get out of its own way. The extra 2 gears of overdrive would still keep the RPM down while cruising. Back in the day when I was a young man you could get the Camaro with a big block and the 4 speed with 4.11 gears. It had a low top end and poor mileage but did go quickly in a straight line on the 1320 and it was a light car compared to the Challenger. Go with the taller gear, you will not regret it. :)
First gear is so low on the A8 that 3.90 gears are really not needed.
 

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I might be a bit late to the party, but I want to sincerely thank the OP for sharing the information he found.

I haven't read this anywhere - and considering these are performance cars, supposedly engineered by enthusiasts, you would think that the nitty-gritty of the mechanicals should be found and comprehensible by anyone... nope apparently not.
Maybe the bean counters pulled it from advertising, or maybe the advertising department has not a single enthusiast amongst their numbers!?

The Canadian website/builder takes it one step further - to absolutely no mention of differential gearing what so ever!?

What I still cannot understand, is model year versus calender year;
As I type this, it's November 21st;
The conventional model year change over is September of the prior calender year;
So we should be in the 2020 model year right!?
Well the Canadian website (I'm pretty sure the cars are built here!?) allows me to build and price either a 2018 or 2019 - and I can only find 2019 PDF brochure...
The USA site at least allows me to select the 2020 model year - even though the default is a 2019.
The USA site offers a download of the 2019 brochure, but not 2020.|

I am pretty sure I'm seeing 2020 Challenger advertisements in my facebook feed... ??

EDIT: I just found these details in the fourty-seven page USA brochure, but they sure where not to be found in the eighteen page Canadian brochure... too bad there are regional option/equipment differences that I cannot glean from one or the other!
the Canadian build models will have the same mechanical equipment as the US versions. Just different emissions specs (unless Canada has adopted US emissions standards that I'm not aware of)
 
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