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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lots of Challenger threads on driving in the rain, but I haven’t seen such a thread specific to 2019 and later wide body’s.

I purchased my 2020 A8 last September, but still hasn’t seen rain ((yet). It came with the Pirelli 305 “all season.” 1100 current miles.

I do not race or burn rubber. Just an occasional speed burst to keep her “alive.”

I know my luck will end eventually, and I’ll get caught in the rain.

I read somewhere that these tires came out with a better rain handling compound around 2017, but don’t know that for a fact.

I’m quite concerned considering some hydroplaning stories I’ve read.

What say you experienced wide body owners?
 

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I have a 2019 SCWB M6 & the day I actually brought her home it was raining like crazy. I had no problems & even under hard acceleration the traction control surprisingly kicked in faster than I wanted it to ( I like to play lol). I think between the aero of the car & the pretty well planted tires it actually dose really well then u get the driving aids & its not bad at all. It's better then just a SC surprisingly from the one that i test drove for the 1sr time. I was tail happy the full distance of a on ramp to a empty highway lol ( again i like to play). I'm switch to Michelin pilot sports to test them out now. So this should be interesting. I will say after a good bit of tread use the Pirelli's lose a but in the feed back to the car at high speed turning & u start to loose confidence as well. In the rain they become just ok after that but thats mosley in standing water spots on the road. Does it hydroplane... a little on those points in time but new wow surprisingly not as much as u would think. I hope this helped.

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2021 SPWB Shaker A8
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They behave very well in the rain, especially with the all season tires. Just watch the throttle going around corners and you shouldn't have any issues. Wet or cold roads require a little more attention coming around corners or with burst acceleration but are still not a problem.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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No WB experience but I have driven my Hellcat (all season tires) and my Scat Pack (high performance tires) in rain. Also a number of other cars mostly with pretty wide and high performance tires fitted.

Bottom line is the cars were ok but I simply had to slow down. In most cases the road drained well enough but all it takes is one area where there's a bit too much standing water and the car can be hydroplaning before you know it. And those areas are present on every road at one place or another.
 

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my new 2021 widebody with summer tires seems fine in the rain, but i also lighten up on it and make sure the traction control is on. no use looking for issues.

think of it this way the wider the tire the more apt to hydroplane so typically a 305 would be worse than a 275 on the regular challengers.

technology has made better tires and less hydroplaning by better tread patterns but it is ultimately up to the end user to access and adapt to each individual situation, anything can hydroplane if the speed to water depth overcomes the tires ability to shed and maintain contact.
 

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2021 Challenger R/T Scat Pack WB; Octane Red, M6
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The 305s will catch standing water/pools of water on the highway more so than 275s or 245s. Its a wider tire. I recently came from a 300c srt with 245s on the front. I can tell a difference between the old skinny tires and the 305s on my new spwb. Just drive carefully and you will be fine.
 

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The big question is tread depth and the design of the tread. That plays the biggest role in how a car performs in rain.
 

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2018 Hellcat. 2017 Scatpack.
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WA state is rather well known for its rainy weather. Ive been caught in it more than a few times. #1. watch your turns/corners...you'll learn to have a light fun pedal as these cars are heavy and carry weight well into a turn..with wet weather, they can "plow", this happens normally just before they spin around.
#2. watch your tail end if/when changing lanes under throttle at speed.
as stated, the wider tires catch more road, if the road is "off" or car gets too much lateral angle of attack, it has a greater effect on the car in correcting itself.
Wider tires do not mean you cant unsettle the car, if there is simply too much speed and not enough rolling traction.
...add a bit of fresh rain on oily/dirty pavement to all that, and things can certainly get sporty in a hurry.
If in doubt &/or still learning, keep TC on and go easy, leave yourself plenty of room for error and youll be just fine.
 

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2011 gwe srt
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The 305s will catch standing water/pools of water on the highway more so than 275s or 245s. Its a wider tire. I recently came from a 300c srt with 245s on the front. I can tell a difference between the old skinny tires and the 305s on my new spwb. Just drive carefully and you will be fine.
yup think of it like snow shoes. the wider the shoe the more you stay on top. A wider tire will always hydroplane more then a narrow one because theres less weight per square in on the ground. Hit a big puddle and youll really see it. You want real scary? Get a time machine and go back and drive my ls6 chevelle with bias 50s on the back. It would really make you pucker when the road got wet. As would the lifted big tire trucks i drove in the 70s. Now those were down right dangerous if you hit a puddle. Ive recovered in the other lane a couple times with those. tread patter makes a differnce but with the same pattern a 305 is going to be MUCH worse then a 255.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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The big question is tread depth and the design of the tread. That plays the biggest role in how a car performs in rain.
Yes. And an all season tire has comprised dry grip for better wet grip.

And the flip side is a high performance tire has some compromise of its wet grip for better dry grip.

For me my usage is such in the dry I demand/make more use of the car's performance and want this maximized. So I prefer a high performance tire.

With high performance tires fitted I am quite willing to be extra careful when driving in wet conditions. I can postpone my "enjoyment" of the car's performance until road conditions are dry once again.

My impression was after having driven the Hellcat on its all season tires in dry and wet conditions then driving my Scat Pack on high performance tires in dry and wet conditions the Hellcat was seriously handicapped with the all season tires. Dry pavement performance was lousy but in the rain the tires still tended to hydroplane too readily.
 
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