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Well...putting some Rocket Racing Booster rims on my challenger in 20" but starting to think 245/45/20 in the front and 275/45/20 on the rear.... but my question is..is there any benefit to doing so?
 

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I have 245/45/20 on front and 275/40/20 on back. A 275/45/20 will be taller than the front.
 

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Ok so I have always had a hard time figuring out/understanding tire sizes. How is a 275/45R20 taller than a 245/45R20. I never seem to be able to figure it out. Thanks.

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Below is information that I borrowed from Tire Rack.

The first number is the width. The second number is the aspect ratio, not the height. A wider tire with the same aspect ratio will be taller.


Section Width

Following the letter(s) that identify the type of vehicle and/or type of service for which the tire was designed, the three-digit numeric portion identifies the tire's "Section Width" (cross section) in millimeters.
P225/50R16 91S
The 225 indicates this tire is 225 millimeters across from the widest point of its outer sidewall to the widest point of its inner sidewall when mounted and measured on a specified width wheel. This measurement is also referred to as the tire's section width. Because many people think of measurements in inches, the 225mm can be converted to inches by dividing the section width in millimeters by 25.4 (the number of millimeters per inch).
225mm / 25.4 = 8.86"
Sidewall Aspect Ratio

Typically following the three digits identifying the tire's Section Width in millimeters is a two-digit number that identifies the tire's profile or aspect ratio.
P225/50R16 91S
The 50 indicates that this tire size's sidewall height (from rim to tread) is 50% of its section width. The measurement is the tire's section height, and also referred to as the tire's series, profile or aspect ratio. The higher the number, the taller the sidewall; the lower the number, the lower the sidewall. We know that this tire size's section width is 225mm and that its section height is 50% of 225mm. By converting the 225mm to inches (225 / 25.4 = 8.86") and multiplying it by 50% (.50) we confirm that this tire size results in a tire section height of 4.43". If this tire were a P225/70R16 size, our calculation would confirm that the size would result in a section height of 6.20", approximately a 1.8-inch taller sidewall.
 

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Well...putting some Rocket Racing Booster rims on my challenger in 20" but starting to think 245/45/20 in the front and 275/45/20 on the rear.... but my question is..is there any benefit to doing so?

The only benefit is a badass "old school" look. Also, better off-the-line traction for Challengers with high horsepower engines.

Like others have said, if you go the staggered tire look, install 275/40/20s on the rear to keep the front and rear tires the same height, otherwise your speedometer will not read accurately.

Also, make sure that your new wheels are at least 9 inches wide for the 275 tires to perform properly.
 

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With all due respect to all SE owners, I think the best bet for the v6 Challenger is to lower it and go with *shorter* tires. That's the easiest way to get a bump in rear wheel torque (as it essentially makes the axle ratio incrementally shorter). It will feel more sporty, and smaller overall tire and wheel means less weight. It may not be a big difference in weight, but if there is to be a change, you want it to work in a positive direction, right? ;) Maybe do lower profile on 18" rims? That will be a shorter tire than the stock 18" with 55 series profile. Then the lowered car will fill in the wheel well space (you'll likely need camber correction bushings, though). Don't go any wider in tire than you need. It may look better, but it is extra dead weight and rotational mass, if you don't have the engine power to break'em loose in the first place. Only carry the amount of "tire" that you need to get the job done. Anything more is extra weight slowing you down.
 
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