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My 2010 5.7 r/t automatic has a 3200 stall comp 274 cam, 3.90 gears, headers etc, got a question about the FTI 3200 converter. I'm not fully tuned yet, but flooring it from a stop in first doesn't even spin the tires anymore. I thought it would take off like a raped ape, nope.. Once it climbed past 3k rpm it takes off, then when it hits 2nd gear the rpms drop back to 2400 and it chugs back up to the useable power range and takes off again. I thought the 3200 stall converter would keep the rpm above 3200 with each shift? I'm kinda confused about it.

Do I need the Mopar TCM or something?

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All a stall convertor does is "convert" engine torque into pressure that the transmission can utilize.

Your car will not rev up to that stall then take off, that's a misconception. The main reason people add higher stalls is for drag racing or to clean up the idle of a big cam. The reason people swap stalls for racing is it allows you to stall the car at a higher rpm, that is, you can foot brake the car and rev close up to that rated rpm of the convertor (without the car or rear tires moving) and launch at or near that rpm. This allows you to put the car into a stronger rpm range than if the stall was lower rated.

You should get a tune but a convertor is a mechanical element and the overall effects cannot really be tuned to be better. Shift points can be tuned for however and that will make the car seem stronger when shifting. From a light or dead stop however, it will feel slightly more sluggish due to the looser convertor (unless you rev the motor up of course).

Good article from summit racing (yes on ebay lol):
The Right Stall: Tips on Selecting a Torque Converter | eBay
 
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