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I've done a fair bit of searching (mainly YouTube, etc) and can't seen to find any real data (dyno results) on the stock airbox vs a CAI on the 392. Mainly interested in ones made by Mopar (part 77072436) or the Hellcat box install, but willing to consider any CAI.

By the way, I have a 2019 Dodge Challenger Skat Pack (392) if that matters.
 

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2015 SRT 392 with TF8, MDS, Tech Grp, & 8.4AN in Jazz Blue Pearl
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From everything I've read and seen, it seems that if all you do is swap out your stock airbox for a Hellcat airbox, you will see your air intake temperature drop quicker and stay cooler longer than with a stock box. However, I have not seen any dyno results showing how this decrease in temperature ultimately affects power. Colder air is just one of many things you want, in addition to others, to get better performance out of an engine, so...
 

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Dyno variations from "run to run" have more HP differences than most CAI's can supposedly make.

Marketing is wonderful.

The more ambient air temps an engine can ingest, the better it can perform, even if it's only in the driveability factor.

The best bang for the buck IMO, is the addition of the HC bottom box and inlet tube. It will draw the more cooler/ambient air to the intake.

I noticed zero performance increase when adding this set up to mine.

That said, in hot weather on a street driven car, I feel better driveability, and air intake temps were reduced. Cooler air, less heat soaking, crisper pedal response.

Best of luck choosing.
 

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The real world HP increase gained via the hellcat airbox & aircatcher inlet cannot be measured on a static dyno, since the car is not in motion, thus no forced air.
A large fan on front of the car is not the same as air being forced into the aircatcher at increasing vehicle speeds and pressures that a vehicle has while actually traveling. In car dynos have shown a realistic 5-7hp bump. This mirrors FCA claims as well, where the aircatcher was credited with bringing the S/C6.1l to over 700hp. If you are seeking static dyno printouts from stock non hellcat airbox vs the hellcat unit, youll likely not find any.
The Hellcat unit is however a true CAI (vs pulling in hot underhood air) and has proven to be the best bang for the buck.
 

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I had a Scat Pack with the 392 and it had 485 horsepower. I now have a T/A 392 with a CAI from the factory. It also has 485 horsepower. There's your real world data on how much power an open CAI works.
Zippo, Zero, Nada
 

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I've done a fair bit of searching (mainly YouTube, etc) and can't seen to find any real data (dyno results) on the stock airbox vs a CAI on the 392. Mainly interested in ones made by Mopar (part 77072436) or the Hellcat box install, but willing to consider any CAI.

By the way, I have a 2019 Dodge Challenger Skat Pack (392) if that matters.
Didn't have my 2018 Scat Pack long enough to monitor intake air temperature but I believe the factory intake already delivers pretty low intake air temperature.

In the past I've used an OBD2 code reader/data viewer/data logger to monitor various engine telemetry. With my Scat Pack and now with my Hellcat the intake air temperature is available via Performance Pages or just cycle through the various engine telemetry via the the arrows on the left spoke of the wheel until intake air temperature is displayed between the tach and speedo.

Based on what I've observed with other cars what you'll see with a hot engine is initially intake air temperature is elevated due to the heat soak of the intake system. Around town this is actually a good thing as the "hot" incoming air helps ensure good vaporization of the fuel for a cleaner running and more fuel efficient engine when used in town.

Once on the highway the incoming air temperature drops quite rapidly with the cars I spent the most time monitoring intake air temperatures to around 12F to 15F over ambient. The increase was from the portion of the intake system upstream of the MAF being heated by the hot air in the engine compartment.

Any further reduction in air intake temperature would require the engine compartment air temperature be lowered. This is a problem with cars like our Dodge Challenger which has the engine compartment receiving air after it has passed through the radiator.

Establish base line behavior with your car's stock intake system by monitoring intake air temperature. Then if you feel the intake air temperature is unacceptably high then get a CAI.

After you install the CAI monitor the intake air temperature and see by how much the air temperature has been lowered.

If the comparisons are done in a consistent manner you'll find little if any real intake air temperature reduction.
 

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Didn't have my 2018 Scat Pack long enough to monitor intake air temperature but I believe the factory intake already delivers pretty low intake air temperature.

In the past I've used an OBD2 code reader/data viewer/data logger to monitor various engine telemetry. With my Scat Pack and now with my Hellcat the intake air temperature is available via Performance Pages or just cycle through the various engine telemetry via the the arrows on the left spoke of the wheel until intake air temperature is displayed between the tach and speedo.

Based on what I've observed with other cars what you'll see with a hot engine is initially intake air temperature is elevated due to the heat soak of the intake system. Around town this is actually a good thing as the "hot" incoming air helps ensure good vaporization of the fuel for a cleaner running and more fuel efficient engine when used in town.

Once on the highway the incoming air temperature drops quite rapidly with the cars I spent the most time monitoring intake air temperatures to around 12F to 15F over ambient. The increase was from the portion of the intake system upstream of the MAF being heated by the hot air in the engine compartment.

Any further reduction in air intake temperature would require the engine compartment air temperature be lowered. This is a problem with cars like our Dodge Challenger which has the engine compartment receiving air after it has passed through the radiator.

Establish base line behavior with your car's stock intake system by monitoring intake air temperature. Then if you feel the intake air temperature is unacceptably high then get a CAI.

After you install the CAI monitor the intake air temperature and see by how much the air temperature has been lowered.

If the comparisons are done in a consistent manner you'll find little if any real intake air temperature reduction.
My '19 SPWB stock airbox IAT's when driving on the highway were consistently 7-9 degrees over ambient temperature. Did the HC lower airbox mod and opened the inner headlight and those have dropped to 2-5 degrees. Generally, at highway speeds with MDS off seems to give the lowest temps-possibly due to overall volume of air moving through the system keeping the whole setup cool.

So for cool air, I think the HC lower airbox is as good as it gets. But, getting a CAI setup just for looks is still a good enough reason to do it. If you want to spend money on dressing up the engine bay, then do it. It looks good and its fun. Part of the muscle car vibe.
 

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BUT !! What I did is run a Diesel air filter on mine, cleaner air and no loss of breathing.

Corsa CAI with a Donaldson filter...………………..
 

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On my '16 SP, on the road IAT's are 2° - 4° above ambient with the HC lower box and a OEM HC filter element.

Initial non modified IAT's were 5° - 9° above ambient typically.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I had a Scat Pack with the 392 and it had 485 horsepower. I now have a T/A 392 with a CAI from the factory. It also has 485 horsepower. There's your real world data on how much power an open CAI works.
Zippo, Zero, Nada
Sure, that matching number is correct on a standing Dyno with no air movement,. BUT, when you are driving, the faster you go, the cooler the air gets with your CAI and more importantly, the air going into your airbox is pressurized forcing the air into your motor at a faster rate. Faster you go, the more power your motor makes (in theory)...
 

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My '19 SPWB stock airbox IAT's when driving on the highway were consistently 7-9 degrees over ambient temperature. Did the HC lower airbox mod and opened the inner headlight and those have dropped to 2-5 degrees. Generally, at highway speeds with MDS off seems to give the lowest temps-possibly due to overall volume of air moving through the system keeping the whole setup cool.

So for cool air, I think the HC lower airbox is as good as it gets. But, getting a CAI setup just for looks is still a good enough reason to do it. If you want to spend money on dressing up the engine bay, then do it. It looks good and its fun. Part of the muscle car vibe.
Same volume of air moving through the intake system. The amount of air the intake system passes is determined by the engine's needs.

So you managed a 5F degree drop in air temperature? If the numbers are accurate that's hardly any real improvement for the money spent.

Even if one is just after the looks, there is the concern about messing with something as critical as the engine's air intake system. One concern would be did the mod put the engine at risk of perhaps ingesting water from road spray?

While you may not use your car in the rain some owners drive year 'round.
 

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Quote: "One concern would be did the mod put the engine at risk of perhaps ingesting water from road spray?"

The way the intake is designed, any water will reach the air box under the filter element, and go to the bottom of the box and drain.

If one hits water so deep, and the amount of water is so much to actually get by the filter, there's going to be bigger issues to the car than just water entering the intake. The car would be flooded and probably totalled.

Driving in the rain isn't going to cause any issues with the HC box and tube. If there was any issues/concern, FCA would have a warning not to drive a HC in the rain.

Haven't heard of, or seen any warning from the factory about this.
 

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Same volume of air moving through the intake system. The amount of air the intake system passes is determined by the engine's needs.

So you managed a 5F degree drop in air temperature? If the numbers are accurate that's hardly any real improvement for the money spent.

Even if one is just after the looks, there is the concern about messing with something as critical as the engine's air intake system. One concern would be did the mod put the engine at risk of perhaps ingesting water from road spray?

While you may not use your car in the rain some owners drive year 'round.
I drive year round in ALL conditions running an lmi fender pull intake then my own mock up, not one single issue , EVER. Just saying, that is a moot point. Lmi keeps me about 1-2* above ambient, but the carbon fiber’s ability to dissipate heat certainly helps avoid heat soak. On a speed density system, temperature it’s just as, if not more critical than air flow, so I’ll take that 5-10* difference. And with the appearance and sound of the lmi , I couldn’t be more satisfied. I even mocked up my own from an air raid(switched to a 6.1 manifold) because it worked so well. While not carbon fiber, the plastic with heat reflective tape works quite well. Not to mention, it out flows the hellcat box.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Same volume of air moving through the intake system. The amount of air the intake system passes is determined by the engine's needs.

So you managed a 5F degree drop in air temperature? If the numbers are accurate that's hardly any real improvement for the money spent.

Even if one is just after the looks, there is the concern about messing with something as critical as the engine's air intake system. One concern would be did the mod put the engine at risk of perhaps ingesting water from road spray?

While you may not use your car in the rain some owners drive year 'round.
Yes, the same volume of air moves through, but it is cooler air and at higher RPM heat dissipates more quickly because the volume is increased. also, MDS closes the valves (that's my understanding) and that reduces air demand by 1/2.

The mod cost me $102 so no biggie there and you can't expect to get temps below ambient, which it will drop to at higher RPM. I didn't buy a 6.4L NA V8 to save money. That's what my 1.4L turbo Dart is for, and on long road trips I take the 3.6L Charger. That one gets 32 mpg on 500 mile trips to No. Cal. Saves me money for spending on expensive fun mods on the Challenger!

With respect to water, if the car hit water so deep it got into the lower fender draw, it would be better to have the headlight open to keep an air source open. The headlight pathway is not direct.

So, if you like spending money on your car and making it your own, then have at it. It is an enthusiast car and it is perfectly fine to mod up and play with just for kicks.
 

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Same volume of air moving through the intake system. The amount of air the intake system passes is determined by the engine's needs.

So you managed a 5F degree drop in air temperature? If the numbers are accurate that's hardly any real improvement for the money spent.

Even if one is just after the looks, there is the concern about messing with something as critical as the engine's air intake system. One concern would be did the mod put the engine at risk of perhaps ingesting water from road spray?

While you may not use your car in the rain some owners drive year 'round.
Clearly do not know as much as you think, about air termperature vs density, volumetric flow & related air compression rates. Even small changes, such as 5 deg AT rduction, a few lbs of greater air flow and reduced air box draw down rates (via additional inlets), can effect engine performance, heat soak reduction, throttle response and general engine responsiveness...particularly true in the Gen III hemis which can be very temperature sensitive. One can improve all of that for less than $150 for an oem component and a 10 minute swap, its really a no brainer.

As far as "messing with something"
The hellcat air box is a FACTORY set up, rain water/car wash concerns/ issues were well thought out & tested by the engineers at SRT & FCA, who, well, I dont know, umm, developed the whole thing....
If you have actually ever looked at the Hellcat intake system in person ( since it seems clear that you dont actually have one), you'd see water intrusion into the actual intake / TB would be nearly impossible, just short of vehicle submersion past the height of the headlights. Direct water intrusion via the open headlight hole would never make it to the throttle body, having defied gravity (throttle body is above the exterior headlight hole vertically speaking), turned not 1, but 3 corners, filled the lower airbox (whose bottom is wide open) then soaked thru the filter and finally got sucked in, unless your sticking a fire hose in there while also driving at WOT or attempting to ford a 4.5 ft river.

I've done numerous Hellcat air box conversions for myself & friends and know of may others in my local car club. NO one to date, now nearing half a decade,has had a single negative issue, be that all season street driving, racing, from getting grief from the dealer at service, trade in or at sale. More to the point, there are many fellow hellcat owners that drive their cars year round, all over the world, in conditions that would make most of us cringe, all without issues. That supercharged system is far more unforgiving to such things, than the n/a 5.7 or 6.2 engines are.
Id say your concerns about messing with something & rainwater intake intrusion, in this case, are really unfounded.
 

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Sure, that matching number is correct on a standing Dyno with no air movement,. BUT, when you are driving, the faster you go, the cooler the air gets with your CAI and more importantly, the air going into your airbox is pressurized forcing the air into your motor at a faster rate. Faster you go, the more power your motor makes (in theory)...
My T/A 392 is no faster than my Scat Pack was.
 

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Clearly do not know as much as you think, about air termperature vs density, volumetric flow & related air compression rates. Even small changes, such as 5 deg AT rduction, a few lbs of greater air flow and reduced air box draw down rates (via additional inlets), can effect engine performance, heat soak reduction, throttle response and general engine responsiveness...particularly true in the Gen III hemis which can be very temperature sensitive. One can improve all of that for less than $150 for an oem component and a 10 minute swap, its really a no brainer.

As far as "messing with something"
The hellcat air box is a FACTORY set up, rain water/car wash concerns/ issues were well thought out & tested by the engineers at SRT & FCA, who, well, I dont know, umm, developed the whole thing....
If you have actually ever looked at the Hellcat intake system in person ( since it seems clear that you dont actually have one), you'd see water intrusion into the actual intake / TB would be nearly impossible, just short of vehicle submersion past the height of the headlights. Direct water intrusion via the open headlight hole would never make it to the throttle body, having defied gravity (throttle body is above the exterior headlight hole vertically speaking), turned not 1, but 3 corners, filled the lower airbox (whose bottom is wide open) then soaked thru the filter and finally got sucked in, unless your sticking a fire hose in there while also driving at WOT or attempting to ford a 4.5 ft river.

I've done numerous Hellcat air box conversions for myself & friends and know of may others in my local car club. NO one to date, now nearing half a decade,has had a single negative issue, be that all season street driving, racing, from getting grief from the dealer at service, trade in or at sale. More to the point, there are many fellow hellcat owners that drive their cars year round, all over the world, in conditions that would make most of us cringe, all without issues. That supercharged system is far more unforgiving to such things, than the n/a 5.7 or 6.2 engines are.
Id say your concerns about messing with something & rainwater intake intrusion, in this case, are really unfounded.
I have driven in 119F ambient temperature and in 1F ambient temperature. If it hadn't been for the outside temperature display I would have not been able to tell you whether which was which by how the engine ran. This has been the case -- well maybe not 119F but 116F or at least in the triple digits -- with a number of my cars over the years.

If you think you are going to feel any difference from a 5F reduction in air temperature you are just fooling yourself.

While the Hellcat air box intake system may be factory is not fitted to other cars. There is no way of knowing if the spray pattern of a car other than a Hellcat through standing water would be ok would not direct water up to the intake.

Water intrusion into the engine does not need to have gravity for this to happen. The engine is pulling in copious amount of air. It would just as easily pull in water if it were in the air stream.

You are right in that I have not studied my Hellcat's air intake -- and I do own a Hellcat -- in any great detail. No need to. I trust it to work on my car. Had I kept my Scat Pack I would have no interest in installing a Hellcat air box on my Scat Pack. The engine breathed just fine with the factory air box and intake system.

I have driven my Hellcat in the rain -- and may do so again later this week as it looks like we are in for a few days of rain here -- and I don't worry about the intake in the rain. But as I mentioned above the Hellat intake is what the Hellcat came with. I'm sure the factory testing has the implemention worry free.
 

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Jesus, man.

For the amount of text you generate about you cars (usually not even the cars being discussed), you don't seem to know a lot about cars as a whole. Also, your stance on modifications is disheartening.
 

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The short and simple fact of the matter is that you will not get any horsepower gain with a CAI. What you will get is an expensive noise maker that looks cool under your hood.

The design of the factory airbox is excellent. Some things are best left alone.
 
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