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didnt even look it up yet..but i do all of my own work..dodge mech over 25yrs

anyways did anyone change their plugs yet? or are they platinum?100k
 

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On 15*+ models the service interval is 100K.

This is what my plugs looks like at 88K

Car idles and runs noticeably smoother after the plugs. They aren’t too dirty but definitely worn

OE Spec calls for Lazer Iridium....what will they think of next?
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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The 30K mile copper core plugs can be run in lieu of the platinum/iridium plugs, no matter which is OE. They are certainly less of a shock to the wallet since 16 have to be purchased at once, but they will have to be changed out much quicker obviously.

If the car is a daily driver, and you are really going to be racking up the miles, the 100K plugs are probably the best option, assuming the budget allows. If the car is a weekend driver and gets its oil changed more on time than miles, the 30K copper core plugs are just fine.
 

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One other benefit to running the longer service life iridium plug is less risk of messing up the threads in the head as you are not changing the plugs out as frequently. Also, FSM says to put mopar anti-seize on the plug threads but I believe NGK states that it is not needed. I have done it both ways and have not had any issues.

I think I confused my liberty FSM with the Challenger FSM...I stated a while ago that the FSM does not mention use of anti-seize. Good thing the new search funchtion works!

 

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One other benefit to running the longer service life iridium plug is less risk of messing up the threads in the head as you are not changing the plugs out as frequently. Also, FSM says to put mopar anti-seize on the plug threads but I believe NGK states that it is not needed. I have done it both ways and have not had any issues.

Less frequent plug changes can put the threads in the head at more risk. If you notice with the pic of the old plug how the discoloration starts at the threads at the tip and extends up. This discoloration is from combustion gases forced into the tiny space that exists where the threads are. These gases leave corrosive compounds which can attack both the plug threads and head threads.

The plug threads are of course discarded along with the old plug. And new threads come with new plugs.

But the head threads are there forever. More frequent changes of plugs keep the head thread exposure to corrosive compounds to a minimum.

Some car makers have a plug change schedule that is based on time and miles. If one doesn't drive the car enough miles over a span of time to trigger a plug change the plug change is due on time. This is to help minimize any harm to the head threads.

I have no experience with plugs for Dodge engines but Porsche plugs came with "dry" threads but with some kind of plating to act as a dry thread lube. (Aluminum) anti-seize should not be used at it can contaminate the O2 sensors.

Now maybe "mopar anti-seize is O2 sensor safe? I think "copper" based anti-seize might (might) qualify.
 

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Less frequent plug changes can put the threads in the head at more risk. If you notice with the pic of the old plug how the discoloration starts at the threads at the tip and extends up. This discoloration is from combustion gases forced into the tiny space that exists where the threads are. These gases leave corrosive compounds which can attack both the plug threads and head threads.

The plug threads are of course discarded along with the old plug. And new threads come with new plugs.

But the head threads are there forever. More frequent changes of plugs keep the head thread exposure to corrosive compounds to a minimum.

Some car makers have a plug change schedule that is based on time and miles. If one doesn't drive the car enough miles over a span of time to trigger a plug change the plug change is due on time. This is to help minimize any harm to the head threads.

I have no experience with plugs for Dodge engines but Porsche plugs came with "dry" threads but with some kind of plating to act as a dry thread lube. (Aluminum) anti-seize should not be used at it can contaminate the O2 sensors.

Now maybe "mopar anti-seize is O2 sensor safe? I think "copper" based anti-seize might (might) qualify.
NGK claims no anti-seize should be used as it can cause one to over torque the plugs. As for less frequent plug changes leading to high risk of thread damage I can say I have read in other forums where more people accidently cross-threaded the heads than have damage due to corroded threads. In fact, cross threading is a risk that is mentioned in the FSM which is why they state hand tighten first to prevent cross threading. Although, I will say on my jet boat that has cast iron heads, if I don't check them for a couple of seasons...there is hell to pay.
 

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NGK claims no anti-seize should be used as it can cause one to over torque the plugs. As for less frequent plug changes leading to high risk of thread damage I can say I have read in other forums where more people accidently cross-threaded the heads than have damage due to corroded threads. In fact, cross threading is a risk that is mentioned in the FSM which is why they state hand tighten first to prevent cross threading. Although, I will say on my jet boat that has cast iron heads, if I don't check them for a couple of seasons...there is hell to pay.
If cross threading plugs is a concern it is not the shorter time between plug changes that is the problem it is the person doing the work that is the problem. Put down the plug wrench and step away from the car...

Plugs are when it comes to threads the sacrificial part in the plug/head thread partnership. Plugs are changed and new ones inserted to help prolong the life of the head threads at the expense of perhaps "too soon" plug changes.

But I am glad with my other cars that when it came time (on miles) to change the plugs the engine did not react to the new plugs. This told me the old plugs were still performing well. I would not like it to after installing new plugs to have the engine react favorably to the new plugs because this would be a signal the old plugs were left in service too long.
 

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What year do Dodge mechanics learn spark plugs?

A Guy
 

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One other benefit to running the longer service life iridium plug is less risk of messing up the threads in the head as you are not changing the plugs out as frequently. Also, FSM says to put mopar anti-seize on the plug threads but I believe NGK states that it is not needed. I have done it both ways and have not had any issues.

I think I confused my liberty FSM with the Challenger FSM...I stated a while ago that the FSM does not mention use of anti-seize. Good thing the new search funchtion works!

Well I was right the first time, the FSM does recommend anti seize but not in the install portion but in the spark plug description.
979485


979486
 
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