Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've just had my spark plugs changed in my '12 Jeep Grand Cherokee with the 5.7L HEMI for the second time in 65,000 per OEM recommendation. I did not see the plugs that were pulled at 32,000 miles but I asked to see the plugs from this recent change. I've attached a picture of one of the plugs. All 16 look about the same. The gap is still a tight .043". I was having no performance problems just following routine maintenance recommendations. The plug in the picture looks pretty good to me and probably did not need replacing. What do you all think?
BillD
 

Attachments

·
Registered
2016 R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
I've been replacing them at 40k on my '10 R/T and they still look fine. I'm currently at 133k.
 
  • Like
Reactions: billzsrt392

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
I've just had my spark plugs changed in my '12 Jeep Grand Cherokee with the 5.7L HEMI for the second time in 65,000 per OEM recommendation. I did not see the plugs that were pulled at 32,000 miles but I asked to see the plugs from this recent change. I've attached a picture of one of the plugs. All 16 look about the same. The gap is still a tight .043". I was having no performance problems just following routine maintenance recommendations. The plug in the picture looks pretty good to me and probably did not need replacing. What do you all think?
BillD
The maintenance interval for the OE plugs is based upon the plugs' expected useful service life and not the engine's ability to use them AFAIK. With a good quality plug like the OE NGK's, you likely don't have to change them out so quickly, as they probably can go much longer. But the recommended intervals have to stoop to the lowest common denominator for the part, which in this case would be something like Autolites I'm guessing. Would an Autolight copper plug last past 30K miles? Maybe, but probably not much past it. But if you stop following the recommended service intervals in order to squeeze more value for your dollar out of the parts, you run the risk of that being used against you as a reason to reject some future warranty claim.

It's a catch-22, no doubt about it. But once the factory warranty has expired, you can start pushing those plugs to 50K without any fear of failure or diminished performance I bet. Assuming you keep the vehicle that long, that is...
 
  • Like
Reactions: billzsrt392

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
677 Posts
I've been replacing them at 40k on my '10 R/T and they still look fine. I'm currently at 133k.

Spark plugs can be deceiving to look at. The internals can be about to give up and they'll still look fine. It's cheap insurance to just replace them at the recommended intervals.
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
I've been replacing them at 40k on my '10 R/T and they still look fine. I'm currently at 133k.

Spark plugs can be deceiving to look at. The internals can be about to give up and they'll still look fine. It's cheap insurance to just replace them at the recommended intervals.
What a coincidence, I had the exact same approach to dating women back in my single days!
 

·
Registered
2016 R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
What a coincidence, I had the exact same approach to dating women back in my single days!

HAHAHAHA :grin2:


Spark plugs can be deceiving to look at. The internals can be about to give up and they'll still look fine. It's cheap insurance to just replace them at the recommended intervals.

Not my first rodeo. It's still running good and the plugs look near new at 40k, I'll stick with it. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
I wasn't aware of the 30K plug replacement spec on the pre-15's until I stumbled across it on this forum. (My 13 R/T had 65K by then and was still running great on OEM copper NGKs). Even at 65K, my plugs looked like yours....a little discolored, but otherwise, ok. As stated, the issue with copper plugs may be in what you can't see (conductor breakdown, perhaps). I put NGK Iridiums in, and even though I thought the HEMI was running great before, the difference was noticeable from the first crank. More "Vroom" from the starrt. More responsive to the throttle commands and definitely had some extra hump first time I tromped the pedal down.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
677 Posts
HAHAHAHA :grin2:





Not my first rodeo. It's still running good and the plugs look near new at 40k, I'll stick with it. ;)
I wasn't referring to the 40K, it's the "still look fine " part. Also, I said what I said so others who may be in their first rodeo won't think they can always tell what's going on with their plugs by how they look .

Sent from my SM-S727VL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Looking around on forum, I see having plugs changed on my 5.7 hemi could cost me around $300 !! Now I'm no mechanic, I work in manufacturing and so use my hands. I think I can tackle this myself. Just wondering if there are any tricks or anything I should watch for etc?? Seems NKG plugs are what people are using. Any suggestions or input would make me feel more at ease. I know it's only plugs, but I don't want to screw anything up! It's a 2013 Challenger R/T Classic. Thanks in advance, Craig

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2016 R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
Looking around on forum, I see having plugs changed on my 5.7 hemi could cost me around $300 !! Now I'm no mechanic, I work in manufacturing and so use my hands. I think I can tackle this myself. Just wondering if there are any tricks or anything I should watch for etc?? Seems NKG plugs are what people are using. Any suggestions or input would make me feel more at ease. I know it's only plugs, but I don't want to screw anything up! It's a 2013 Challenger R/T Classic. Thanks in advance, Craig

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

It's not a bad job. Get a a couple of extensions and a swivel as a couple plugs are not straight shots. Stick with the standard NGK's. I've seen several posts where going to other plugs caused issues...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
Just did them on my 13 R/T Classic in March, right before I put it back on the road for the season (was stored since November). Here are my tips.

1. You can use the NGK Iridiums in place of the stock NGK Coppers. The coil packs on our '13s are the same as the 15+ Challengers, which started coming with the 100K mile NGK Iridiums. So their correct for the "hotter" burning Iridium plug.

2. Coil packs come off very easy. 10mm socket (maybe a swivel to get around some stuff like the dip-stick or air box.) No need to mark the coil pack control wiring/plugs because they're not long enough to inadvertently put on the wrong pack. Also, coil packs are identical, so no reason to put them back exactly where the came. I put them in a box out of the way, but didn't keep track of which one came off of which cylinder.

3. Shoot some PB Blaster down each plug tube and let it soak (I let mine soak overnight, but that was probably overkill.

4. Inspect the gap on your new NGKs. Manual calls for 0.043 gap. The NGKs I bought at Advance Auto Parts were pre-gapped and were all correct, however, some people have reported that their NGKs were not all correct and had to tweak them. Be very careful, because the iridium tip is a very fine point and very brittle.

5. Use a spark plug wrench with a insert that grabs the shaft of the plug, and remove the plugs. I opted to remove/install one at a time, so I didn't have all 16 holes sitting open at once.

6. Once you get the plug out of the tube, roll up a paper towel into a small tight tube (like a tightly packed over-sized doobie), and slide it down the tube to sop up the PB Blaster that may be pooled at the bottom, up against the threaded hole.

7. Before you insert the new plug, I found that the PB Blaster that got into the plug wrench, caused the rubber insert to become loose and when I installed the first plug and pulled the wrench back out...the rubber insert stayed on the plug. It's nearly impossible to retrieve the insert from the plug with any type of grabber tool, so what I did was use a separate spark plug wrench (without a rubber insert) for installing the plugs. Because of the diameter of the tube, it's virtually impossible to get the wrench/socket on the plug crooked enough to snap the ceramic shaft. Just be careful.

8. Never-seize is a hot debate. Some say that the chrome finish threads on the NGKs don't need them. Others say they do. I split the difference and put just a small amount of never-seize on the threads.

9. Thread the plugs in finger tight (they're fine threads, so you'll wear out a set of elbows, spinning 16 of them in and and out) and then torque to 13 foot/lbs or 156 inch/lbs depending on the scale on your wrench.

10. Put a small amount of dielectric grease in the each boot of the coil packs, slide them into place, and tighten the bolts to 8 ft/lbs or 96 inch/lbs. One or two of the bolts were impossible for me to get my torque wrench on, so I used my highly calibrated wrists to estimate the correct torque. (After tightening a few, you'll know how tight to make them).

11. When you start it up, the PB Blaster that made it into the cylinders will produce a little white smoke. This goes away pretty fast.

12. Take advantage of having the engine cover off to clean up the valve covers and do general house-keeping and inspection. Mice had chewed up my firewall and made a nest under the engine cover (a mess to clean up before I started), so before I reinstalled the engine cover, I repaired the damaged firewall insulation and inspected all wiring for mice-marks.

I did this job over three evenings (just because it was March, there was too much snow and salt to take the car out anyway, and my garage isn't heated). Took me about 1/2 hour to take the engine cover off, remove the coil packs and hit them with PB Blaster. Next night, about one hour to swap out all 16 plugs. Next night, about 1/2 hour to put the coil packs back on and engine cover back on. Around 2 hours total.
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
@72/340 pretty much summed it up, but here are some pics for reference just in case:

Here is the normal socket and extension for a set of spark plugs - image_1527174138233.jpg

But that extension is too long to work for most of the plugs on the 5.7L Hemi. You will need the next shorter size plus a wobbly hootus - image_1527174188088.jpg

NOTE: the wobbly hootus is too loose and prone to wobble in its natural state. Wrap some electrical tape around the joint to get better control of it while using it (I unwrapped mine in pic above to show wobbly hootus’ design)

I would also recommend a ratchet like this:
image_1527174416330.jpg

Notice the push button on the back of the head. That engages/disengages the little ball on the driver side:

image_1527174453609.jpg

This is beneficial for spark plug insertion because it helps prevent pulling away from plug only to find you’ve left the socket and extension behind. It’s not critical to use a ratchet like this, but it’s helpful for sure.
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
Regarding @K-Dawg’s list, I would add to #4 this little nugget of info:

if you find that you have to adjust the gap on an iridium plug (or platinum for that matter), you should ONLY bend the electrode by using a gapper tool with a little bender attachment on it (no sliding gappers in other words, throw those away):

image_1527175163717.jpg

See the parts of those 2 gappers that are almost touching? Those are the bending attachments for iridium and platinum plugs.

You may hear that iridium and platinum plugs cannot be regapped or should not be regapped, etc. That’s hogwash; just as long as you use a gapper like above to measure and regap, you’ll be fine on both iridium and platinum plugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I knew I would get great feed back. Thanks to all who took the time to respond to my questions! All good info. Hopefully within the next couple weeks I will attempt to change the plugs, and use all the info given by u guy's. Will post on how the job went when I'm finished. Thanks again u Mopar pro's!!

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
442 Posts
"...plus a wobbly hootus -"


LMAO. I just always thought that was a universal joint. Next trip to the hardware store I'm asking for a wobbly hootus.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 72/340

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
"...plus a wobbly hootus -"


LMAO. I just always thought that was a universal joint. Next trip to the hardware store I'm asking for a wobbly hootus.
That’s a common misconception, but universal joints are the thingamajigs that connect your driveshaft to your rear-end in older RWD vehicles.

If the counter-jockey at the hardware store doesn’t know what you’re talking about when you ask for a wobbly hootus, you may have to use its official, non-slang name - hooteramus.

As in, “Pardon me dear sir, can you kindly direct me to the aisle on which I would find an assortment of hooteramuses that wobble?
I need the 3/8” drive one in particular, but if all you have is the 1/4”, I can make that work with one of those hootuses that goes from 1/4” to 3/8”, why are you laughing at me sir?
Sir?!? Stop laughing, I implore you!!”

At least that’s how it usually goes for me...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 72/340

·
Super Moderator
2016 SXT Plus Blacktop
Joined
·
20,768 Posts
If you have a wobbly hootus, spark plugs are the least of your problems...

A Guy
 
  • Like
Reactions: 72/340

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
7,730 Posts
If you have a wobbly hootus, spark plugs are the least of your problems...

A Guy
You know, it’s a good thing the folks over on the ChargerForums site are too stuffy to appreciate what I can bring to the table, otherwise I’d be hanging out over there and waxing philosophic.

But then who would y’all have to kick around? Not your old buddy, Nuke, that’s for sure!

So see, you shouldn’t make fun of how I talk so relentlessly, because at any moment, BLAMMO!, all the stuffy, no sense-of-humor-having members over on ChargerForums suddenly deregister, thereby allowing me to start pontificating more on that site, leaving ChallengerTalk without anyone to point and laugh at.

That’s a bleak picture of the possible future, very bleak indeed! Fortunately it’s not set in stone...yet?

Now if you’ll excuse me, I just heard the shower shut off, so I’m gonna go see if Mrs Nuke would like to use my wobbly hootus for anything before she goes to work...anything at all...you’d be surprised at what all my wobbly hootus is good for.

(I’d give you a list, but I don’t think we know each other well enough just yet!)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ashoka
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top