Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
HID Lighting Facts: 5 Things You Need to Know

High Intensity Discharge (HID) lighting is the technology where light is created from electrical current passing through metal vapor. In HID bulbs, a tube of glass is filled with gas and has two electrodes on either side. When an arc of electrical current is established between the electrodes, the metallic vapor releases energy in the form of light. HID lighting has several advantages over fluorescent or halogen lighting and is starting to be used more as a replacement for halogen lights as automobile headlights.

If you are thinking of converting to HID lighting, there are five things you need to know:


1) HID lighting has several advantages over halogen headlights

One advantage of HID lights is that HID lights are brighter and give better visibility to drivers than halogen lights. You as the driver will be able to see further and more clearly at night, also other drivers will be able to see better due to your lights.

HID light bulbs also last longer than halogen lights. Since HID lights do not have a filament in them that could burn out like halogen lights, HID light bulbs can last 2000-3000 hours vs 450-1000 hours for halogen light bulbs.


HID lighting requires less energy consumption than halogen lighting. HID lighting uses 35w vs 55w for halogen lighting. Most cars are set up with a 55w output, so if you are converting to HID lighting make sure to install the ballasts that come with your conversion kit so that the output will be reduced to 35w.


2) When converting to HID lighting or replacing HID light bulbs, you want to make sure to always get a matched pair of HID bulbs.


After about 100-500 hours of use, HID light bulbs undergo what is called a color shift. The light emitted by the bulb will shift slightly from a yellowish color to a more crisp blue color. You want a matched pair of HID bulbs so that this color shift occurs at the same time. When buying HID light bulbs, make sure that they have the same manufacturer, part number and use time (if previously used).


3) Understand the Kelvin temperature (k). (EDITED)


The kelvin temperature scale for HID bulbs goes from 3000k-15000k. HID kelvin is a measurement of heat energy/temperature that directly relates to color. Here is the relation for BFxenon lights and the colors each admits; 3000k (yellow), 4300k (white/yellow), 6000k (pure white), 8000k (white/blue), 10000k (deep blue) and 15000K (bright purple).


4) How to maintain and extend life of your HID bulbs. HID light bulbs last longer than other forms of lighting, but there are steps you can take to maintain their long life.

a. Use the right ballast and housing that is matched to your HID light.
b. Let your bulbs cool down between lightings. Turning an HID light off and on more than three times in an hour reduces the life of your bulb.
c. Set the HID light to burn in the correct position and plane which is horizontal +/-10% burn positioning.
d. Avoid touching the bulb with your skin. Oils and acids from the skin deposited on the glass can damage the bulb.


5) Use caution when handling HID lighting.


Do not handle HID bulbs excessively because oils from your skin can be transferred to the bulb and damage it. Also because HID light bulbs are filled with metallic vapors, in some cases mercury, caution should be used not to break them and when disposing of them. The voltage produced by the electrodes in the bulb is high and could give a shock if you are too close. The headlight assembly will protect you from this, but use caution when changing bulbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
Try seeing in a heavy rainstorm... I live on Oregon coast and now way in hell I would have HIDs.... I got all options but HID.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,544 Posts
One article says let the HIDs cool off between "lights". One these cars with HID lights and you hit the fob to unlock the door the headlights activate so you can find your feet in the garage. Then you go to start it and they go out and back on after the car starts and you have the headlights on Automatic. I guess it is best to have the dealer kill the approach lights when the key fob is pressed to unlock the doors. (?)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,001 Posts
Try seeing in a heavy rainstorm... I live on Oregon coast and now way in hell I would have HIDs.... I got all options but HID.
Is your experience from factory HIDs or aftermarket?
I have factory HIDs and they seem fine in heavy rain - to the extent any headlights are fine in heavy rain.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,987 Posts
Most of the info is nice, but the OP's explanation of "Kelvin" is a bit flawed. A lower color temperature will not result in a "brighter" light. In fact the Kelvin number is purely the color temperature of the lamp and has nothing to do with brightness. In fact, a "cooler" lamp (5000-6000deg K.) will appear brighter to the eye at night than a 3000K (warm white) lamp. I could get into details about Photopic vs Scotopic vision, but suffice it to say that at low light levels (nighttime) your eye shifts into night vision mode and becomes more sensitive to blue light (moonlight) than daytime vision when it is more sensitive to red/yellow light (sunlight). You will see new construction taking advantage of this with new outdoor lighting that is much more blue than you have seen traditionally.

Sorry to chime in, but with all the car talk, someone finally got to something I know a little about as I do a lot of lighting design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,412 Posts
Read this if you think you want to do a HID conversion:
HID Disadvantages
.....x1000. I would encourage others to read the linked article and browse the rest of that website if you want the facts. ....especially if you are thinking of installing an HID kit in a non-HID application (i.e. fog lamps, halogen reflector housings and even halogen projectors). There is more to a proper, effective & safe HID system than just the light source which I think is relevant if you're going to have a discussion like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Bayou - Thank you for bringing this up and clarification on some of this statement! This was an old article, that I reposted that appears to need revision (education never stops :D). Even according to the temp scale, it does not match our current color range.

How is this:

The kelvin temperature scale for HID bulbs goes from 3000k-15000k. HID kelvin is a measurement of heat energy/temperature that directly relates to color. Here is the relation for BFxenon lights and the colors each admits; 3000k (yellow), 4300k (white/yellow), 6000k (pure white), 8000k (white/blue), 10000k (deep blue) and 15000K (bright purple).

In regards to your statement, "low light levels (nighttime) your eye shifts into night vision mode and becomes more sensitive to blue light (moonlight)," the xenon arc scale rates a 4100-4300K temp as the closest color to the light produced by the moon.


Most of the info is nice, but the OP's explanation of "Kelvin" is a bit flawed. A lower color temperature will not result in a "brighter" light. In fact the Kelvin number is purely the color temperature of the lamp and has nothing to do with brightness. In fact, a "cooler" lamp (5000-6000deg K.) will appear brighter to the eye at night than a 3000K (warm white) lamp. I could get into details about Photopic vs Scotopic vision, but suffice it to say that at low light levels (nighttime) your eye shifts into night vision mode and becomes more sensitive to blue light (moonlight) than daytime vision when it is more sensitive to red/yellow light (sunlight). You will see new construction taking advantage of this with new outdoor lighting that is much more blue than you have seen traditionally.

Sorry to chime in, but with all the car talk, someone finally got to something I know a little about as I do a lot of lighting design.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,987 Posts
Bayou - Thank you for bringing this up and clarification on some of this statement! This was an old article, that I reposted that appears to need revision (education never stops :D). Even according to the temp scale, it does not match our current color range.

How is this:

The kelvin temperature scale for HID bulbs goes from 3000k-15000k. HID kelvin is a measurement of heat energy/temperature that directly relates to color. Here is the relation for BFxenon lights and the colors each admits; 3000k (yellow), 4300k (white/yellow), 6000k (pure white), 8000k (white/blue), 10000k (deep blue) and 15000K (bright purple).

In regards to your statement, "low light levels (nighttime) your eye shifts into night vision mode and becomes more sensitive to blue light (moonlight)," the xenon arc scale rates a 4100-4300K temp as the closest color to the light produced by the moon.
Light a bit bluer than 4300 (5000-6000k) gives awesome visual acuity at night but as mentioned this light needs to be controlled at the roadway as your night vision can be easily disrupted by a bright light in your face.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,532 Posts
so in the real world where there are other cars messing with your eyes, it would be best to use white light as well.

im not buying this blue light helps you see better. if that was true, flashlights would be blue, not white
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Yes, most people love the 8000K temp as it has a slight hue of blue to it.

We have also taken the factory housing optics into consideration when developing our kit and our engineer has done a great job at keeping the stray light to a minimum.

Not to mention, even if you look directly into the light housing of a halogen bulb, it will still hurt your eyes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The 8000 light will illuminate the signs better than 4300K and will add to overall visibility. Not to say that 6000K (white) will not do the same thing

so in the real world where there are other cars messing with your eyes, it would be best to use white light as well.

im not buying this blue light helps you see better. if that was true, flashlights would be blue, not white
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,412 Posts
Only for about 10 seconds, then your retina is burned off. I hate driving opposite of people with HIDs.
....it is much worse when it's an HID kit in a non-HID application (especially a reflector housing). ….add a light source with more of a “blue” output and the glare problem for oncoming motorists is amplified.


The following article (taken from the same site 70stroker linked to) explains the effects “blue light” has on the human eye:

Dangerous, illegal, blue headlight bulbs

….and this one discusses the subject of HID conversions/”kits”, the differences in HID vs. halogen design, etc.:

Thinking of converting to HID?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,659 Posts
BF I saw you have universal housings on your website? Would those be better off for HIDs, for oncoming drivers? And do they fit our cars?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
[QUOTE) HID lighting has several advantages over halogen headlights

HID light bulbs also last longer than halogen lights. Since HID lights do not have a filament in them that could burn out like halogen lights, HID light bulbs can last 2000-3000 hours vs 450-1000 hours for halogen light bulbs.[/QUOTE]

You maybe under estimating the hours that these bulbs last, I have a 2006 300CSRT with 150,500 miles/3800 hours on it and I have not replaced the lights yet. I will keep you posted when one finally burns out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Yes, these are conservative estimates.... If you over estimate you could possibly mislead the consumer. Chances are, HID will out last a halogen light by 3x but in the case they dont, you will hear about it! hahaha. :D

[QUOTE) HID lighting has several advantages over halogen headlights

HID light bulbs also last longer than halogen lights. Since HID lights do not have a filament in them that could burn out like halogen lights, HID light bulbs can last 2000-3000 hours vs 450-1000 hours for halogen light bulbs.
You maybe under estimating the hours that these bulbs last, I have a 2006 300CSRT with 150,500 miles/3800 hours on it and I have not replaced the lights yet. I will keep you posted when one finally burns out.[/QUOTE]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
No...those housing will not fit the new Challenger... they will fit a 70 Challenger! :D

As for being "better" goes, the housing is meant to convert a sealed beam headlight housing to one with a replaceable element (halogen or HID). The photometrics of the housing is developed around the light discharged by the element.

BF I saw you have universal housings on your website? Would those be better off for HIDs, for oncoming drivers? And do they fit our cars?
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top