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Hello, so ive had my WB Scat Pack for a while now and it has just under 1900miles - ever since i started checking the engine oil after getting gas ive grown exceedingly paranoid. The damned dipstick is so retarded i cant even.. it has a very dull mesh pattern where it says "SAFE" inside. At the bottom of the pattern there is an arrow pointing up and the letters "ADD". Ever since i started checking the oil, (5min after shutoff on level surface) its extremely hard to tell where the oil level is at accurately. Like i seriously need to squint my eyes and angle the dipstick to be able to tell anything at all.

https://imgur.com/kTAyQXU
Here is a picture the first time i checked it. Yellow arrow shows it within the SAFE area.
However, after that every time i have checked, the oil has been at the blue mark, just above the ADD arrow, and then when i tilt and angle the dipstick i can see faintly oil where i marked with the RED line. Rest of the dipstick is dry. What gives? Oil life is at 70ish %

What are your experiences owning these cars? Have you guys/gals needed to add oil before the first oil change? Note that i just drive it to work and back, occasionally cruise around and drive it a bit harder on saturdays and sundays... nothing that would call for more oil at this mileage..
 

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The oil has a tendency to run down the dipstick sometimes if you don't hold it flat, but I get what you mean. Sometimes it's like the reading is different each time you pull it out. All you can do is wipe it really good and try again, sometimes I turn the stick around 180 degrees and see what it says on the other side, and compare the 2 sides. If you can get a consistent flat area enough times, that's where it is.
 

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You aren't the only one finding these dipsticks hard to read. I get a different reading every time I check it and that's within a few miles. Sometimes it reads just over full. Other times just under full. I put 7 quarts in when I changed it. It was slightly over full. (19 R/T).
 

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Wait until you realize that when you add the 7 qts you're told to add in the owners manual the dipstick reads overfilled crankcase. This drives me nuts far more than the poor dipstick design.
 

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2018 Scat Pack SHAKER in Plum Crazy
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Key to checking is check it cold at home, not when you fillup. The oil is still draining down for a good bit.
But, I check when filling up, something to do while waiting, after cleaning the back window.
 

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My HC's oil dipstick is hard to read. I check the oil level with the engine cold and after sitting all night under a carport. Or I check the oil level with the engine hot -- fully up to temperature not just "warm" -- after letting the car sit with the engine off while I fill the gas tank.

In both cases it takes me several attempts to get a feel for the oil level. It helps if there is sunlight in which I can hold the dipstick in which helps me see where the oil level is on the telltale.

Worst oil dipstick ever.

(My other car a 2018 Mini JCW does not have a dip stick. To check the oil level the engine has to be running, at idle, up to temperature and probably rather level but I have not bothered to verify how level. I command the oil level measurement operation via the iDrive control. My two previous cars -- ignoring my 2 months with my Scat Pack -- one, the Porsche 996 Turbo had no dipstick either. Like the JCW the oil level was measured/checked with the engine running, up to temperature and level. The Boxster while it had a dip stick I could get an oil level measurement from behind the steering wheel with the engine cold simply be turning on the key and waiting while the timer counted down from 5 seconds. If the engine was shut off after being fully up to temperature and left to sit a while -- just long enough to fill the gas tank -- I could check the oil level hot after the 5 second wait.)

Couple of things: One is you need to check the oil regularly and often with a new car. Oil consumption varies from new engine to new engine. Check the oil level cold before you take the car out for the first time of the day and check the oil level with the oil hot. Like I mentioned above after stopping for gasoline is a good time. On a long trip I check the oil level in the AM before leaving the hotel and after every fill up. After every fill up because on a long trip each fill up can be after several hundred miles of driving.

Two is when you check the oil level cold then hot the level can differ. So what you need to do is check the level cold and then hot and to learn what cold level the oil needs to be so when the oil is hot the oil level is not too high.

Three is my advice is to unless forbidden by the owners manual to change the oil early. With my HC I changed the oil at around 500 miles, again at 2K miles (end of "break in"), and then at 5K miles. And thereafter every 5K miles.

However, since I had the oil changed at 10K miles last December when June rolled around I had only put 3K miles on the car but the oil change schedule is 6K miles or 6 months. So I had the oil changed after 6 months with only 3K miles on the oil.

Four I can add while in the case of my HC the oil level didn't really drop much at all from new and as I broke in the engine and then went beyond the break in miles, as I have started driving the car with more well, spirit, but not like I stole it, oil consumption has gone up some. Not lots but around a quart in 5K miles. It appears higher RPM operation increases oil consumption. This does not come as a surprise as I'm well aware of one of the things that can cause oil consumption to go up is more RPMs (or lots of idling). Still it is interesting to note the HC engine does this.
 

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2015 Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack
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Pull the dipstick out, wipe it off, stick it back in, then take it out again and take a reading.

I agree with the above poster. When changing oil, only add about 6.5 quarts (assuming 5.7L or 6.4L) instead of the full 7 quarts. I think some oil is still in the engine after draining and if you put the full 7 quarts in it will read over full.
 

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You are not only one having this issue. I usually dipstick 2-3 times just to make sure.

Mopar or No Car
2 or 3 times? That is good. I'm like 7-8 times myself. Its that bad that friggin dipstick.
 

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My 392's dipstick is the same way. My previous 5.7 was almost as bad.

One observation on both, you will get a different reading on each side of the stick.

Several years back in a SRT Chat Session, the engineers commented that the Hemi can safely run on 6 to 8 quarts of oil. The factory states to put in 7 with a filter change.

That's what I've always done with no issues, other than that damn sticks reading.

I seem to get the best (?) reading after the car has set all night and is "cold". It still reads over/ high, but stays there between changes.

I'll keep putting in 7 at oil/filter changes and call it good.
 

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Pull the dipstick out, wipe it off, stick it back in, then take it out again and take a reading.

I agree with the above poster. When changing oil, only add about 6.5 quarts (assuming 5.7L or 6.4L) instead of the full 7 quarts. I think some oil is still in the engine after draining and if you put the full 7 quarts in it will read over full.

If the car is reasonably level, the engine not super cold, and the drain interval of reasonable length the oil can't defy gravity. It drains out.


(With other cars the factory clearly stated the oil drain conditions: Car level. Engine up to some minimum temperature. A drain interval of at least 20 minutes but with some engines an hour drain interval was called for. Then a specific amount of oil was to be added back in the engine. With cars with an electronic oil level sensor this allowed the tech to confirm the sensor reported the correct amount of oil. It was how the sensor's proper operation was verified.)


I hope if anyone follows your procedure at least he check the oil level again shortly after refilling the engine and if it low -- which almost certainly it will be -- to add sufficient oil to bring the level up to "full".
 

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2 or 3 times? That is good. I'm like 7-8 times myself. Its that bad that friggin dipstick.

Like I said worst dipstick ever.


My last car with a dipstick -- not counting the 2 months I spent with a Scat Pack -- was my Boxster. While it had an electronic oil level sensor which I used almost all the time occasionally -- just to keep in "practice" -- I'd use the dip stick. Easy peasy. Pull the dipstick (cable actually) out wipe it down insert it fully all the way into the dipstick tube, give it a count of two, then remove and note the reading. No having to guess or repeat the procedure to know the oil level.


Likewise my 2006 GTO's dipstick was easy to read. No need repeat the process several times to come up with some sort of consensus as to what the oil level "might" be.
 

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Does anyone's car actually use any oil?
As in, the dipstick shows low and you have to add oil?
First if the dipstick indicates the oil level is low you should add the proper amount of the right oil to bring the level up to a safe distance above the low level. My preference is to heck with guessing what a "safe distance" above low is but instead to add oil to bring the level up to full but avoiding overfilling the engine with oil. I don't want to add just enough oil to hold the engine over until the next time I check the oil level.


Some oil consumption is a fact and normal.

There are things that can make this less than obvious. In some cases the car is used in such a way the oil doesn't get that hot and hot long enough so water builds up in the oil. (The water is a normal byproduct of combustion.) This water replaces the oil that is consumed by the engine.

As I have mentioned before at around 4K miles I had the oil analyzed in my 2002 Boxster.The analysis found around 7% water content. With just over 9 quarts of oil capacity this represented around 1/2 quart of water was part of the oil. Thus the level was good but 1/2 quart of oil was gone -- burned -- but replaced with the same amount of water.

(Prompted by the amount of water in the oil even though the car didn't get used for short trips I monitored the coolant temperature via an OBD2 tool and found the coolant temperature struggled in the winter weather conditions to get even up to 190F. This explained the rather high amount of water content in the oil. This experience also highlighted the importance/benefit of early oil services which I was aware of long before I bought this car but had sort of let slip from my consciousness.)

Now what can happen is the driver drives the car and notes the fact and is smug about it the oil level doesn't appear to be going down. Then a long trip is taken or the car is used in some way the engine gets hot and stays hot and this boils the water out of the oil. At some point the oil level is checked and the smugness is gone when the level is way down. Now it looks like the engine has an oil consumption problem but in fact it has been using a "normal" amount of oil the whole time. The driver just didn't know this.

BTW, any oil the engine uses doesn't have to be oil that gets past the rings or past the valve stem seals or through the guides.

The engine generates a considerable amount of oil vapor. (Videos of an over head cam engine operating at high RPMs shows the space under the cam shaft cover which is made out of a clear material is filled with oil vapor the extreme rotational speeds of the cams/chain/sprockets all work to turn liquid oil into vapor. While an OHV engine -- like the engine in our Dodge vehicle -- is not as bad it is bad enough and it also produces considerable oil vapor. The crankcase fumes are routed to the intake and along with other stuff in the crank case fumes oil vapor goes along. But there is an oil vapor recovery gizmo (years ago it was a wad of rather coarse steel wool) which catches the vapor which has it revert to liquid and this liquid oil then makes its way back into the rest of the oil.

But this vapor recovery can be quite inefficient. Enough so a considerable amount of oil vapor is passed through to the engine and this oil vapor burned.

One can see evidence this oil vapor is making it past/through the oil vapor recovery system if he takes time and the effort -- which admittedly is above and beyond what a typical owner would do -- to gain access to the intake manifold and check the intake walls around where the crankcase vent hose connects to the intake manifold. Almost certainly he would see the wall wet with oil.

(Techs who have the opportunity to view the intake at this level report the intake wall being wet with oil is very common.)

My point is "high" oil consumption is probably just oil being lost as vapor. If the rings or valve stem seals/guides are "bad" the engine would smoke when running. The loss of oil due to vapor only has the engine smoking, and then not every time, upon cold start.

As the owner of a new car, or even as the owner of a used car that is unknown to you, you should make it a habit to check the oil level to develop a sense of what if any oil consumption there is and to ensure the oil level is kept to reasonable levels to ensure the engine never runs low on oil.

To minimize the possibility of oil loss due to the oil leaving the engine as vapor run the factory recommended oil.

Do not run the oil too long. As the engine runs the oil gets contaminated, which is normal. A side effect -- also normal -- is the contamination can increase the propensity of the oil to foam and increase the amount of oil vapor which of course increases the oil lost.

Do not over fill the engine, but do not under fill it either. I strive to keep the oil level at the max level.

The odds are the engine in your car while it will use some oil -- this would be normal -- will not use too much. And unless the engine smokes while in operation the odds are this oil consumption is not due to any mechanical issues but just due to an inefficient separation of oil vapor from crankcase fumes as these fumes are routed to the intake manifold.
 

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Does anyone's car actually use any oil?
As in, the dipstick shows low and you have to add oil?
I had 42k on my '10 R/TC. Never even got close to "low/add" mark by 5k oil change time.

My present '16 SP has 27k miles. Same as above.

If either "used" any oil, it certainly wasn't/isn't very much, and I run it hard.
 

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2018 Scat Pack SHAKER in Plum Crazy
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...The engine generates a considerable amount of oil vapor. (Videos of an over head cam engine operating at high RPMs shows the space under the cam shaft cover which is made out of a clear material is filled with oil vapor the extreme rotational speeds of the cams/chain/sprockets all work to turn liquid oil into vapor. While an OHV engine -- like the engine in our Dodge vehicle -- is not as bad it is bad enough and it also produces considerable oil vapor. The crankcase fumes are routed to the intake and along with other stuff in the crank case fumes oil vapor goes along. But there is an oil vapor recovery gizmo (years ago it was a wad of rather coarse steel wool) which catches the vapor which has it revert to liquid and this liquid oil then makes its way back into the rest of the oil.
...
Yep, PCV used to burn off those vapors instead of releasing to the air, but that oil is gone. Original PT Cruisers would lose oil that way, looked like ring smoke, but PCV. And then there are people that remove/block PCV thinking it is powerrobbing emission control crap. Then the vapors and moisture create milky acidic sludge everywhere, not like the old "road tube" days for airflow IN the engine.
As for the dipstick another source of the "problem" is today's engines are too good, the oil doesn't get black quick enough from soot blowby, so hard to see the glob of nasty oil on the stick. As for getting different readings I haven't noticed it. But I check while fueling, and remove/wipe/insert fully/remove/look, as long as it is remotely near full, good to go. If it is getting dark, I check the % Oil Life gauge and plan next change.
 

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I had 42k on my '10 R/TC. Never even got close to "low/add" mark by 5k oil change time.

My present '16 SP has 27k miles. Same as above.

If either "used" any oil, it certainly wasn't/isn't very much, and I run it hard.
My experience with my 2018 Mini JCW is similar to your experience with your cars. The JCW now with over 17K miles and the engine receiving an oil change at around 600 miles, then 2K miles, then 5K miles then every 5K miles since and except for a possible bit of oil consumption initially the engine has not used any oil since then. And I run the car pretty hard. With "only" 2800lbs to move and with 228hp and 236 ft lbs of torque the engine is a bit of a beast. (If the JCW 2.0l engine was scaled up to the same size at the HC engine the power output would 706hp, just 1hp shy of the HC's 707hp.)

Might mention too the oil is a synthetic 0w-20 oil as per Mini/BMW.

Oh, and I have been data logging the JCW engine and coolant temperature runs towards the hot side, to 212F and higher. While I don't have access to the engine oil temperature I'm pretty sure (pretty sure) the oil runs rather warm as well so I am comfortable with the belief/assumption water accumulation is not replacing oil.

The engine uses a unique technology to provide throttle to the engine. There is not a traditional butter fly valve -- well, there is one but it is a back up from what I can gather. The amount of air admitted to the engine is controlled by intake valve timing and lift. The engine has variable valve timing and valve lift. Under low RPM operation the valves are not open very far and timing is adjusted as necessary too but as I push down on the gas pedal the valves (I'm sure though I have no way of seeing this) are allowed more lift. Timing is changed too. At WOT the valve lift is maxed and who know what the valve timing is. Along with this sophisticated variable valve timing and valve lift system comes a lot of oil vapor production. All that fancy valve hardware requires a flood of oil which can only mean the amount of oil vapor in the engine is huge. It would appear that Mini/BMW engine engineers have come up with a real oil vapor recovery system that keeps this vapor (and oil) inside the crankcase where it belongs. 'course, the real "proof" of this would be to check the intake manifold for any real signs of oil making it from the crank case to the intake but I probably never will get a chance to do that. But it is on my list of things to do and that is to speak to a Mini/BMW tech and ask what he has observed.
 

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you have to wipe the dip stick really dry and I'll hold it horizontal and look at an angle to see the "wet" part.

I've also turned it over as the smooth side is a bit easier to see, put my thumb near that and turn over to refer to the level.

Engines can use oil, especially during the break in period.

I'd have drops of oil level and then it would stop. My 392 never required oil to be added during its break in and with 27K on it, still the same.

Which is convenient, since with a Shaker, you have to remove the 4 bolts, remove the top of the scoop to access the oil filler. [they are shipped with a magnetic 10mm nut driver tool in the glovebox to facilitate any stops to add oil]
 

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I was actually referring to the modern 6.2's And 6.4's. And also my 5.7 Ram.
The last vehicle I have had that used(leaked?) oil was my 98 Ram with a 318 and it didn't use a drop until about 160K.
Prior to that my GM 350's required constant monitoring, A qt low was common. It leaked out and burnt out.
My Honda's, Toyota's, and Dodge's (post 17 Dodges ) do not use any.


Knock on wood
 

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2018 Dodge Challenger T/A Plus in Yellow Jacket w/5.7L and A8 automatic
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Key to checking is check it cold at home, not when you fillup. The oil is still draining down for a good bit.
But, I check when filling up, something to do while waiting, after cleaning the back window.
Totally different engines, but my 2018 RAM 4500 with the Cummins specifically states a minimum of :30 for a proper oil level check. This is with either 15W40 or 5W40 synthetic engine oil.

The commonality is........both the 6.4L and 6.7L Cummins are both at the “40” end of the spectrum at operating temperatures.

I, too, only check on a cold engine, or at least after :30, on the T/A, the wife’s Grand Cherokee Limited, or the Dodge Dart, all running 5W20 Castrol Edge Synthetic.
 
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