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"With my HC I changed the oil at around 500 miles, again at 2K miles (end of "break in"), and then at 5K miles. And thereafter every 5K miles." Very smart man. On my RT with conventional oil, I had it written into the contract that they would do one oil change at the dealer, before I drove away with the car. I watched the mechanic, and he showed me the importance of pucks or wood blocks on top of the swing-out lift arms to avoid crushing the rocker panels. That alone was worth the cost of an oil change.

Then like this guy I did the first oil change myself at about 700 miles, then 1500 miles, then 3,000 miles, then every 3,000 miles as the regular interval. You only get one chance when the engine is new to get those particles out of there. I slap an NIB magnet on my oil filter to catch particles.

For the OP, you can take out the dipstick and clean it with denatured alcohol and a cotton ball from the CVS or pharmacy near you. When you get the dipstick metal clean, just use a Sharpie marker to mark to fill areas on the stick. Also you can very slightly score the dipstick with a small hacksaw to bring out the fill marks.
Did he lift it by the lift points on your car or at the pinch weld?
 

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On the rear lift points of the car in front of the wheel wells, the black plasticy "tubes" coming down. On the front, I don't remember since I bought the car in 2012. My current dealer where I go for recalls, etc. usually lifts on the pinch welds in front with a rubber puck I believe.

Other than that the car is never on an overhead lift anyway, since I change my own oil.
 

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On the rear lift points of the car in front of the wheel wells, the black plasticy "tubes" coming down. On the front, I don't remember since I bought the car in 2012. My current dealer where I go for recalls, etc. usually lifts on the pinch welds in front with a rubber puck I believe.

Other than that the car is never on an overhead lift anyway, since I change my own oil.
Gotcha'...thanks! Mine has been on a lift only once, but if IIRC, it was also by the pinch welds using rubber pads on the lift.
 

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I spoke to the mechanic at the dealer I use now, and he said they lift under the pinch welds on the front with their claw lift, but you don't want to leave the car up like that overnight, they set it down at the end of the day. I've seen other LX cars like Chargers where the pinch weld folds sideways and then you have a real problem. Generally I think unibody cars are garbage, I like a stand alone frame on a car, that's what I've always had previously to the Challenger. Unibodies are less expensive to manufacture, it's a lot of welds.

Two things I don't like about the Dodge, unibody and half shaft rear driveline. I always prefer a solid rear axle. I spun out in the snow on my Charger and racked the rear wheel into a curb. The wheel was sticking out at an angle and crabbing. The body shop showed me the little arm that folded back and it looks like pot metal junk. The rear wheels are suspended by a hodgepodge of struts and arms which I guess my grandmother could fold over. It's all junk in my opinion, but that's the way Dodge makes these cars. I assume it's cheaper for them.
 

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Last time my car was at the dealer they bent the outer layer of sheet metal on the passenger side pinch weld. I discovered it when was jacking the car and noticed the plastic rocker panel was bulging and pulled away from the fender. It was easy to fix but shouldn't happen at the dealer. (They almost always f*&% up something) I use aluminum pinch weld adapters with magnets that hold them to the pinch weld then use 2 floor jacks to raise the front of the car. The adapters work great. I normally put jack stands under the unibody rails but have left the car jacked up on the pinch weld adapters for several days without any damage.
 

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I spoke to the mechanic at the dealer I use now, and he said they lift under the pinch welds on the front with their claw lift, but you don't want to leave the car up like that overnight, they set it down at the end of the day. I've seen other LX cars like Chargers where the pinch weld folds sideways and then you have a real problem. Generally I think unibody cars are garbage, I like a stand alone frame on a car, that's what I've always had previously to the Challenger. Unibodies are less expensive to manufacture, it's a lot of welds.

Two things I don't like about the Dodge, unibody and half shaft rear driveline. I always prefer a solid rear axle. I spun out in the snow on my Charger and racked the rear wheel into a curb. The wheel was sticking out at an angle and crabbing. The body shop showed me the little arm that folded back and it looks like pot metal junk. The rear wheels are suspended by a hodgepodge of struts and arms which I guess my grandmother could fold over. It's all junk in my opinion, but that's the way Dodge makes these cars. I assume it's cheaper for them.
You make some great points here. I, too, prefer a vehicle that is full perimeter frame. I've never thought that unibody cars were very sturdy. However, I found that out when I was a teenager and got into cars and hot rodding. To my surprise, I found out that some of the cars had no frame! Having been under my Challenger changing the oil gave me the opportunity to look at the suspension closely. I'm surprised that the suspension can even support the car, let alone allow it to function. No doubt that cars do well in crashes vs. some of the earlier manufactured cars, but yet they are so easy to total and if they're not totaled, they are somewhat expensive to repair. I've seen some of the YouTube videos and photos on other sites of Challengers and Chargers that had been in crashes with what appeared to little damage, but yet they were totaled. It almost makes me fear driving mine sometimes.
 

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You make some great points here. I, too, prefer a vehicle that is full perimeter frame. I've never thought that unibody cars were very sturdy...
Old dodges were typically banned from demolition derbys because of how strong the car was and took forever for the slow collisions to break the drivetrain. They used to have classes just for them!
You would see the GMs literally peeling off of the frames. Watch the 1959 vs 2009 Chevrolet crash test, full frame is a manufacturing benefit more than a structural.
 

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Old dodges were typically banned from demolition derbys because of how strong the car was and took forever for the slow collisions to break the drivetrain. They used to have classes just for them!
You would see the GMs literally peeling off of the frames. Watch the 1959 vs 2009 Chevrolet crash test, full frame is a manufacturing benefit more than a structural.
"Slow collisions" is the key phrase here.
 

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Changed the oil/filter in my 2011 SRT8 today. 7 quarts w/new filter per the book. As it always does, it showed above the fill line when cold. After the change, I drove it about 20 miles and came back home. Shut it off and waited about 5 minutes or so, then checked it again.....this time, it was right at the top of the "safe zone"...perfect.
Yeah, that dipstick is hard to read, especially with fresh oil, but it's possible even with this old man's eyes...LOL
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger R/T, 6 Speed
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I usually check the oil when the car is cold. The cold oil seems to run down the dipstick a lot less. I also watch my oil pressure guage. If your oil level is low, usually an easy indicator is oil pressure starts dropping at low rpm's.

As far as the 7 quarts thing. Mine reads a tiny bit high on the dipstick with 7 quarts. Not enough for concern, maybe 1mm or so. The SRT filter is a higher capacity filter so that brought down the oil level a little bit. That and not trying to squeeze every drop out of the oil bottle but stopping when it stops pouring made the oil level just about perfect.

Compared to the E92 M3 this car is a breeze to change the oil on. 8.8 liters of 10w60 (comes in liters), 2 drain plugs, no dipstick (fill to a a little over 8 liters, turn car on, watch display on dash and add oil until full), an oil cooler and a cartridge oil filter that oil pools up in the mount of makes it difficult on that car.
 

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I usually check the oil when the car is cold. The cold oil seems to run down the dipstick a lot less. I also watch my oil pressure guage. If your oil level is low, usually an easy indicator is oil pressure starts dropping at low rpm's.

As far as the 7 quarts thing. Mine reads a tiny bit high on the dipstick with 7 quarts. Not enough for concern, maybe 1mm or so. The SRT filter is a higher capacity filter so that brought down the oil level a little bit. That and not trying to squeeze every drop out of the oil bottle but stopping when it stops pouring made the oil level just about perfect.

Compared to the E92 M3 this car is a breeze to change the oil on. 8.8 liters of 10w60 (comes in liters), 2 drain plugs, no dipstick (fill to a a little over 8 liters, turn car on, watch display on dash and add oil until full), an oil cooler and a cartridge oil filter that oil pools up in the mount of makes it difficult on that car.
Would never let the oil level get so low that a lower than normal oil pressure was the result.

At least once a week I check my Hellcat's oil level when cold, after the car has sat all night since its last use, before taking the car out.

Then whenever I fill up the gas tank I check the oil level this time with engine up to operating temperature. By the time I have filled the gas tank and cleaned the windows the engine has sat long enough that the oil has had plenty of time to return to the pan.
 

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2015 RT, Scat Pack.......Shakerrrrrr
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Hello, so ive had my WB Scat Pack for a while now and it has just under 1900miles - ever since i started checking the engine oil after getting gas ive grown exceedingly paranoid. The damned dipstick is so retarded i cant even.. it has a very dull mesh pattern where it says "SAFE" inside. At the bottom of the pattern there is an arrow pointing up and the letters "ADD". Ever since i started checking the oil, (5min after shutoff on level surface) its extremely hard to tell where the oil level is at accurately. Like i seriously need to squint my eyes and angle the dipstick to be able to tell anything at all.

Here is a picture the first time i checked it. Yellow arrow shows it within the SAFE area.
However, after that every time i have checked, the oil has been at the blue mark, just above the ADD arrow, and then when i tilt and angle the dipstick i can see faintly oil where i marked with the RED line. Rest of the dipstick is dry. What gives? Oil life is at 70ish %

What are your experiences owning these cars? Have you guys/gals needed to add oil before the first oil change? Note that i just drive it to work and back, occasionally cruise around and drive it a bit harder on saturdays and sundays... nothing that would call for more oil at this mileage..
I sure wish this post would just go away.

Itz a dipstick.......oil will attach itself to it because itz designed to. Regardless of what you see, you must be knowledgable of a simple car care reality. Check once, check twice.
 
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