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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be ordering my '15 in 4 weeks. I've never owned a stick shift car before (and honestly have only driven a stick a couple of times...about 15 years ago...need to borrow my buddies Jeep and re-educate myself). I do have a couple of questions in regards to the 6-speed Challengers:

1) How long does a clutch normally last? I'm just using mine for basic day-to-day driving, not really going to track the car (though I do enjoy driving a bit hard on empty twisty roads). But for just daily driving, how long do they typically last?

2) I'm assuming the Traction Control system in the 6-speed cars is the same as on the Automatic cars (I live out in the country, so mine will be seeing all-year driving...and we get a decent amount of snow each year)...is this assumption correct?
 

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Unless you beat the crap out of your car the clutch should last as long as you own it. No reason why it shouldn't last 100K miles.

When engaged the TC is the same on M6 and A5, but if you're going to be driving in the snow be sure to get snow tires and be sure your car does not come with summer-only tires.
 

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The life of a clutch all depends on the owners abilities to drive the car. I have had multiple car reach 100,000 miles and still no issues but someone with bad habits could burn one up in less than 50,000 miles.
My opinion is this car is more fun with a stick and if that's what you want don't second guess yourself and buy an automatic or you will regret it. I'm sure you'll do just fine. Good luck.
 

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I had to drive mine most of last winter because of my truck being down. It was an interesting event for sure. The traction control was very apt on dry pavement for sure. It has saved me from disaster a couple times. In the snow it did seem to help get u going but i never went over 20mph when it was real bad if i got out of all. After some main roads had been treated it wasent to bad. 3 or 4 inches if ur a careful driver u will be ok but anything like we had last year and u better get a ride.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had to drive mine most of last winter because of my truck being down. It was an interesting event for sure. The traction control was very apt on dry pavement for sure. It has saved me from disaster a couple times. In the snow it did seem to help get u going but i never went over 20mph when it was real bad if i got out of all. After some main roads had been treated it wasent to bad. 3 or 4 inches if ur a careful driver u will be ok but anything like we had last year and u better get a ride.
You're right in my back yard, so you know the winters I'm talking about. I live about 5 miles south of Kokomo in Sharpsville...and there were only maybe 3 or 4 days I didn't dare venture out because of the weather, and that's in a RWD Charger with All Weather Tires.
 

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I have the 6 speed. I read a great article in Car and Driver many years ago (probably can find it on the 'net somewhere) in which the author gave instructions for how to maintain the same clutch for the life of the car. It went something like this:
1) KEEP YOUR FOOT OFF THE CLUTCH
2) Don't downshift to slow down, brakes are much cheaper than clutches
3) KEEP YOUR FOOT OFF THE CLUTCH
4) Never use the clutch to keep the car steady on a hill
5) KEEP YOUR FOOT OFF THE CLUTCH
6) Etc...
Every other rule was "KEEP YOUR FOOT OFF THE CLUTCH". Anyway, the point was to use the clutch only when REQUIRED and you should never have to replace a clutch. I have to say that since I read that article I've never replaced a clutch and I've had many, many manual transmission cars.

Mike
 
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2) Don't downshift to slow down, brakes are much cheaper than clutches
I agree with the others but this one is questionable. Our brake pads are over $350 a set and will be changed out several times before the clutch will need any work; $400 to $450 with labor if you can't replace them yourself. Also If you coast while stopping you can't accelerate out of a problem situation if need be. The fraction of a second it takes to get back in gear can make all the difference. Sure you can coast by applying the clutch but what fun is that? I bought a manual because I like rowing the gears. Five and half years and 46,000 miles of "spirited" driving on and off the road race track with a supercharger with lots of downshifting and no problems. Don't was time worrying about granny coaxing an extra few miles out of it but simply enjoy and have fun! Besides, driving in harsh winters and on country roads, a lot of others things are going to happen long before the clutch wears out.
 
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Who is paying $350 for pads? Never have paid near that ever. Anyway, if you learn to drive a stick which seems to be a lost skill of people 35 and under and learn it right the clutch will last easily 100k if not more. When I was a kid my dad drove a vw rabbit 5 speed, him and I shared the car and clutch was fine. Mom drove it for one day and we had to replace it. Point is, there's being able to drive a manual and really knowing how to drive a manual.
 

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Point taken on the pads. This was probably 15 to 20 years ago that I read that article and I would imagine there was no such thing as $350 pads! It was still an entertaining read with a few good ideas. I wish I could remember the rest of the "rules". As a matter of fact, I just wish I could remember what I had for lunch yesterday...
 

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This coasting to a stop criticism has come up several times.

This whole point about not being able to accelerate out of an emergency if you're coasting to a stop assumes that when a person is doing this is doing it in a situation where an emergency may arise.

Just for the record I (and I'm sure everyone else) who coasts to a stop in N is doing so in a situation where there is no chance of needing to accelerate.

We're not retarded, you know. :fight:
 
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Driving a manual transmission without down shifting and engine braking during spirited driving through twisties is like neutering the car.

Might as well have an automatic and use auto-"stick". :scratchhead::rofl::shrug03::dunno::cry::IThankYou::lol:

Get it, learn it, enjoy it.
 

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Driving a manual transmission without down shifting and engine braking during spirited driving through twisties is like neutering the car.
Who's suggesting that? :confused:
 

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Who is paying $350 for pads?
This is just one brand but it's typical

2008 Dodge Challenger SRT-8 Front Brake Pads Ceramic (Mopar) at 1A Auto.com


This coasting to a stop criticism has come up several times.

This whole point about not being able to accelerate out of an emergency if you're coasting to a stop assumes that when a person is doing this is doing it in a situation where an emergency may arise.

Just for the record I (and I'm sure everyone else) who coasts to a stop in N is doing so in a situation where there is no chance of needing to accelerate.

We're not retarded, you know. :fight:
Any time you are in traffic you are in a situation where an emergency can arise. A good driver tries to be aware and allow for the unexpected as things can happen fast. Coast if you want, it's your choice. But, remember what I've written if you ever see a big truck rushing towards you in your rear view mirror who didn't see the red light and you are fumbling trying to get back in gear so you can maneuver..., well, hopefully you get the idea. If I have to explain it to you further you're never going to catch on.
 

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Any time you are in traffic you are in a situation where an emergency can arise. A good driver tries to be aware and allow for the unexpected as things can happen fast. Coast if you want, it's your choice. But, remember what I've written if you ever see a big truck rushing towards you in your rear view mirror who didn't see the red light and you are fumbling trying to get back in gear so you can maneuver..., well, hopefully you get the idea. If I have to explain it to you further you're never going to catch on.
Yo, I've been driving for over 50 years and haven't had a moving violation or accident in over 45 so don't lecture me like I'm a freakin' retard. :bash:
 

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1) KEEP YOUR FOOT OFF THE CLUTCH
2) Don't downshift to slow down, brakes are much cheaper than clutches

Mike
That better?
 

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MCO_Carter,

You can drive a car hard without being hard on the clutch. I have had cars with over 150,000 miles on the original clutch. People who rev the engine too much and let out the clutch too slowly will wear the clutch rapidly.

Now drag racing is a different situation if you are trying for the best times out of the box. This requires some clutch slipping (on purpose) and will wear it faster.
 

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Yo, I've been driving for over 50 years and haven't had a moving violation or accident in over 45 so don't lecture me like I'm a freakin' retard. :bash:
Glad to hear it! I hope your streak continues. However, your logic is flawed. The fact that you've avoided an accident in a long time doesn't diminish the wisdom of employing defensive driving. Look, you're not going to change my mind and I'm not going to change yours. I'm not lecturing you. That would be a waste of my time. I wrote what I wrote for the benefit of the OP and any others who might find some merit in it. I've written what I've written and I stand by it. I see no more need to spar back and forth with you.
 

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Here's a good rule.

Never depress the clutch pedal for more than one second.

If you are hold the clutch in longer than that, you are going to have premature throw-out bearing and sifting problems.
 

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