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I dont think you'll have to worry about the s/c engine being named the hellcat. They won't release a s/c car


I think they'll stick with the TA theme in SRT and call it a SRT Challenger T/A.
 

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this may be a stupid question that has been answered in the other thread but...

if that is supposed to be the new model that is a s/c 6.2L why does it still have 392 badges?

did they just drop the motor in a 392 for testing? and if so, why hide the trim?
 

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since the hellcat will be an srt8 offering, i imagine they wanted to use the suspension and brakes that come in a 392 rather than an r/t or se model. Plus the badging allows them to keep up the subterfuge while testing.
 

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Discussion Starter #65 (Edited)
HK, don't know about the 392 badges, but I think Rayzaoo's photo may have given us a BIG clue as to what the front end will look like. When you asked "why hide the trim" I started to look closely at the masked area. I noticed that the stripes over the bumper continued to the underside of the bumper. I then noticed that the chin spoiler stripes along with the spoiler construction continued into the lower grille area. It appears to me that the chin spoiler is now incorporated into the lower grille, with a possibly taller and wider entry area. The draped edges of the spoiler defiantly appear more pronounced. The larger grille area opening and spoiler directing large air flow could very well support an intercooler in that location. If I see what I think I see, this will be quite an aggressive new look for the Challenger front end. Just when I thought it was perfect! Thanks for the "stupid question"!
 

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this may be a stupid question that has been answered in the other thread but...

if that is supposed to be the new model that is a s/c 6.2L why does it still have 392 badges?

did they just drop the motor in a 392 for testing? and if so, why hide the trim?
I think this is similar to when they were initially testing the Mustang 5.0 with the old body style.

It could be that the new exterior isn't completely finalized yet and what we are seeing is the early stages of testing.


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this may be a stupid question that has been answered in the other thread but...

if that is supposed to be the new model that is a s/c 6.2L why does it still have 392 badges?

did they just drop the motor in a 392 for testing? and if so, why hide the trim?
They may have cut outs or prototype vents affixed to the existing facia for underhood cooling testing - can you imagine all the internet 'chatter' that would be going on if this mule wasn't camouflaged?
"Look, its the new Challenger...here's what they did...we have proof"

I've seen similar things with MB models in testing - the current bodystyle is used, but it can have a lot of tacked-on (or hacked up) parts to facilitate testing, but the final production version wouldn't resemble the test mules.

Some of these had riveted on parts, which were obviously done as needed for clearance, new equipment, etc.
 

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this may be a stupid question that has been answered in the other thread but...

if that is supposed to be the new model that is a s/c 6.2L why does it still have 392 badges?

did they just drop the motor in a 392 for testing? and if so, why hide the trim?
The only stupid questions are the ones that are not asked.

But to answer your question... This is a powertrain mule which means that the only focus on this car is to test the motor, transmission, rear diff, exhaust and other parts associated with the powertrain. The 392 badges and other designations are irrelevant to what is really going on with this car. At the time the "Hellcat" received the green light, the only fully functional platform that they could use is the current one (a lot of manufactures do this in the preliminary phases of development). And also since the LA platform is very similar to the LC platform they can also test the new platform without any one giving notice.

Another thing to remember is that things change all they way up till production so they do not want to advertise a certain feature/badge they will more than likely change numerous times during the engineering/development process.
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Having now become officially obsessed with the mule photo posted by Rayzazoo, I noticed the obvious omission of model designation missing from the drivers side of the grille. Could this mean that there will be a new Challenger model name for the supercharged version? Having seen many mule photos in the past, I don't recall ever seeing one with "test" parts that correspond to the cars paint scheme, including the stripes. I think there is more here that almost meets the eye. I'm going out on a limb here. Based on what I have described in my previous post, as to what I "see" in the photo, four things:
1. You are looking at the finished version of the supercharged Challenger front end.
2. The fascia will be model specific to the supercharged version.
3. The supercharged version will have it's own name, not SRT or R/T related.
4. You will see this car at SEMA in November.

I have probably relegated myself to lurker land for a long time if I'm wrong.
Does anyone have the availability to poto shop a Challenger front end based
on what I have described in my post prior to this one?
 

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Having now become officially obsessed with the mule photo posted by Rayzazoo, I noticed the obvious omission of model designation missing from the drivers side of the grille. Could this mean that there will be a new Challenger model name for the supercharged version? Having seen many mule photos in the past, I don't recall ever seeing one with "test" parts that correspond to the cars paint scheme, including the stripes. I think there is more here that almost meets the eye. I'm going out on a limb here. Based on what I have described in my previous post, as to what I "see" in the photo, four things:
1. You are looking at the finished version of the supercharged Challenger front end.
2. The fascia will be model specific to the supercharged version.
3. The supercharged version will have it's own name, not SRT or R/T related.
4. You will see this car at SEMA in November.

I have probably relegated myself to lurker land for a long time if I'm wrong.
Does anyone have the availability to poto shop a Challenger front end based
on what I have described in my post prior to this one?
I think this might help.

http://www.challengertalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=94151

and this

http://www.challengertalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=98814



1. You are looking at the finished version of the supercharged Challenger front end. This is more than likely a 392 front end with cutouts in place of the fog lights to test airflow to the front brakes (similar to what was on the white 392 spy shot).


2. The fascia will be model specific to the supercharged version. The Hellcat fascia will not have fog lights.


3. The supercharged version will have it's own name, not SRT or R/T related. It will be an SRT vehicle and the badging for SRT8 will be changed to just SRT now that it is an official brand (similar to Jeep SRT8 to Jeep SRT). Hellcat is the name of the engine and not the car but it will still be a Challenger SRT with a special edition label (ACR, T/A, GT, etc)


4. You will see this car at SEMA in November.. Ralph Gilles stated it will debut at Springfest 9 and also debute at the New York Auto Show.



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Having now become officially obsessed with the mule photo posted by Rayzazoo, I noticed the obvious omission of model designation missing from the drivers side of the grille. Could this mean that there will be a new Challenger model name for the supercharged version? Having seen many mule photos in the past, I don't recall ever seeing one with "test" parts that correspond to the cars paint scheme, including the stripes. I think there is more here that almost meets the eye. I'm going out on a limb here. Based on what I have described in my previous post, as to what I "see" in the photo, four things:
1. You are looking at the finished version of the supercharged Challenger front end.
2. The fascia will be model specific to the supercharged version.
3. The supercharged version will have it's own name, not SRT or R/T related.
4. You will see this car at SEMA in November.

I have probably relegated myself to lurker land for a long time if I'm wrong.
Does anyone have the availability to poto shop a Challenger front end based
on what I have described in my post prior to this one?

I don't think the new Challenger will be unveiled at SEMA this year, but I promise to take hundreds of pictures if it is. Lol, I'll take pictures of everything you guys want to see

Nick C.
 

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Discussion Starter #74 (Edited)
Rayzazoo thanks for the links. The volume of information you have provided is very appreciated. I especially like your latest photo post, thats what I think I see in your mule photo. I hope this is it. Really looks great, thanks again.
 

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They had to use "hellcat" cuz "hellokitty" was already taken.... lol!!! :browsmiley:
 

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They were both supercharged...

Actually, it was a radial engined Navy fighter built by Grumman Corp. on Long Island in N.Y.
The supercharged king of the air you may be thinking of, was the P-51 Mustang with a Rolls Royce Merlin V-12.
As a matter of fact, all WW2 aircraft that flew over 10,000 feet, were supercharged. Superchargers were developed for that purpose. The air is thinner at altitude, so they needed a system to keep pressure near sea level atmospheric pressure, otherwise, the aircraft could not fly high enough to clear mountains. It also helped bombers stay above flack during high altitude missions. The fact that superchargers helped increase speed at lower altitudes was a side effect.

As for the Hellcat name, it honors the F-6F Carrier based fighter that "won the Pacific." Dodge code names it's motors after military aircraft: AH-64 Apache, F-15 Eagle, etc. Incidentally, the original Ford Mustang was named after the P-51. The Horse was added later.

As for the P-51 being the "King of the Skies," ....it was a the F-4U Corsair that was the "King of Pacific Skies." It had great performance, but the P-51 could not have served on carriers. Carrier aircraft had to be built heavy in order to survive carrier landings. This toughness helped the aircraft sustain battle damage as well. Naval piston engine aircraft used radial engines. This was because they were air-cooled. These planes could operate with more than one piston shot out.

The P-51, Spitfire and Me 109 had liquid cooled engines. These motors had a narrow cross section, allowing the plane to be thinner, smaller, and have less aerodynamic drag. But these engines were fragile. If a coolant line was taken out, the plane would overheat...and not fly.

Naval Aviators needed an engine that would not quit. If you lost your motor, and ditched at sea during WW2, Odds are you would not be found.

The Hellcat is a perfect name for the Challenger motor. Like Naval Fighters that were HEAVY and BIG....(needed big motors to obtain performance similar to the P-51... The P-51D used a 1400 SHP Rolls Royce motor.....The Hellcat and Corsair had 2000 HP Radials), The Challenger needs a big motor to keep up with today's Mustangs.
 

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I don't understand anyone getting upset over "Hellcat", but then I couldn't believe people complained about the Dodge Demon either.

Some people just aren't happy unless they're finding something to complain about.
 
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