Dodge Challenger Forum banner

21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,591 Posts
you left out the part about taking loose the alternator as part of getting the timing cover loose and then bolting it back to the engine and timing chain cover to finish up the procedure.

it took me 4 days to swap out my alternator on this car, so those two steps alone in that procedure will probably add 24-36 hours to the total time spent on the service if I do it myself.
I did mention - in post #2. there's those long bolts involved, but its not that bad. The 220A versions are heavier yet than the 180A version used on 5.7s...I can tell you that.

My '92 Lumina Z34 required separating the lower control arm / ball joint to have access to r & r the alternator (FWD transverse V6 (DOHC)) and it was on the backside of the V of the block (between engine and firewall) - that was a job I paid to have done when the alternator died...I knew I didn't want to attempt that one.

I can't recall if the half shaft had to be pulled - I recalled reading the procedure in the service manual...I knew enough to not take on that job.
 
  • Like
Reactions: EvilChallenger

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
When you go on the owner's site, do any recalls show up for your VIN?

If so, then I'd take it in and get it done as a free recall. If not, then I'd roll the dice and hope that you won't have any issues.
Nope. My car, as configured per its VIN, does not list the P01-Timing Chain service as an applicable recall.

However, my VIN is no longer an accurate indicator for what hardware is on my car. Now that I have a 3.06 rear-end, I meet all the criteria listed in the recall for a car that should have this service done to it:
- car was build within a specific date range: yes
- car has a 5.7L: yes
- car has an auto trans: yes
- car has a 3.xx rear-end: yes, now it does.
The alternator in my '11 Challenger R/T went poof back in 2015. A buddy of mine who was a long-time Dodge master mechanic quickly told me, "I know you like to do your own work, but you don't want to do that job yourself." He's never steered me wrong.
My 5.7L has the oil cooler, which is coincidentally right square in the way of the alternator when trying to replace it. I didn’t realize just how much trouble that would add to the job u til I was already pot-committed.

Without the oil cooler, replacing the alternator would be a real pain in the backside IMHO. With the oil cooler, the job becomes a perfect candidate for paying a pro to do for you, IMHO.

It took me 4 days from start to finish, and I came close to giving up several times anyway. 😞
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
I did mention - in post #2. there's those long bolts involved, but its not that bad. The 220A versions are heavier yet than the 180A version used on 5.7s...I can tell you that.

My '92 Lumina Z34 required separating the lower control arm / ball joint to have access to r & r the alternator (FWD transverse V6 (DOHC)) and it was on the backside of the V of the block (between engine and firewall) - that was a job I paid to have done when the alternator died...I knew I didn't want to attempt that one.

I can't recall if the half shaft had to be pulled - I recalled reading the procedure in the service manual...I knew enough to not take on that job.
I stand by my original assessment of the alternator replacement on a Hemi with an oil cooler! 😥😓😰🥵
 

·
Registered
2016 R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
1,198 Posts
I had wondered how much effect the MDS operation might have on the premature wear that the recall is supposed to address/prevent.

I noticed the recall specified auto transmissions only, so MDS sprung to mind as a contributing factor to the problem. I disabled the MDS on mine pretty quickly after acquisition, so out of the 100K miles I’ve put on the engine, only the initial 10-15K miles max were subject to any MDS operation at all.

But MDS has been disabled since before the rear-end upgrade that put me in the recall’s wheel house, so a total of 0 miles of the 10-12K miles since the rear-end upgrade have been subject to MDS operation.

Yeah, I’m starting to think this might be a good scenario in which to apply the old “Let sleeping dogs lie” adage.

If I go through with this service now, I could be potentially dumping more money into the engine than the car is worth (on the resale market; to me it’s priceless!!), and there is no guarantee that I’d be preventing something from happening that even had a likelihood of happening...a slim possibility at best, is more accurate I think.

But more importantly, I now have your iron clad promise it won’t happen to my engine, right @72/340?😁

Still, just to be safe, I’m gonna need your personal cell phone number in case it does happen and I’m left stranded somewhere...that way you can come fix it for me! ;)
Grape Ape and I will come to your rescue Nuke. Well maybe, almost 200k I can no longer guarantee LOL. Having had my old RT for a little over 10 years and 163k I'm pretty well versed on the TC failures. Mine broke at 42k with the cruise set at 72 mph. Right in the bad harmonics range most TC failures occurred, caused by the MDS engaged, A5, 3.06 gear combo. I never ran MDS again after that. Had to have both heads, oil pump, cam phaser, chain, guides, etc replaced. Two years later the recall came out and mine was redone again. She had no further engine issues.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nuke

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Grape Ape and I will come to your rescue Nuke. Well maybe, almost 200k I can no longer guarantee LOL. Having had my old RT for a little over 10 years and 163k I'm pretty well versed on the TC failures. Mine broke at 42k with the cruise set at 72 mph. Right in the bad harmonics range most TC failures occurred, caused by the MDS engaged, A5, 3.06 gear combo. I never ran MDS again after that. Had to have both heads, oil pump, cam phaser, chain, guides, etc replaced. Two years later the recall came out and mine was redone again. She had no further engine issues.
Ouch, that sounds like a lot of damage to happen all at once...but then again, for anyone wondering how important the timing belt maintenance is to perform on schedule on the 3.5L-powered Challengers and Chargers, take note of this damage. That is pretty much what can happen on an interference engine when it's allowed to interfere with itself. 😲

I am curious though, when the chain jumped ship and the engine imploded, was it pretty much instantaneous? Or did it stumble and die after loping and chugging a few seconds?
 

·
Registered
2015 Dodge Challenger SRT
Joined
·
542 Posts
Nope. My car, as configured per its VIN, does not list the P01-Timing Chain service as an applicable recall.

However, my VIN is no longer an accurate indicator for what hardware is on my car. Now that I have a 3.06 rear-end, I meet all the criteria listed in the recall for a car that should have this service done to it:
- car was build within a specific date range: yes
- car has a 5.7L: yes
- car has an auto trans: yes
- car has a 3.xx rear-end: yes, now it does.


My 5.7L has the oil cooler, which is coincidentally right square in the way of the alternator when trying to replace it. I didn’t realize just how much trouble that would add to the job u til I was already pot-committed.

Without the oil cooler, replacing the alternator would be a real pain in the backside IMHO. With the oil cooler, the job becomes a perfect candidate for paying a pro to do for you, IMHO.

It took me 4 days from start to finish, and I came close to giving up several times anyway. 😞
You're a brave man!

That's exactly why I took my buddy's advice and paid the shop to do the work. Fortunately, when the recall came out a year or so later, FCA sent me a full refund.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,591 Posts
Ouch, that sounds like a lot of damage to happen all at once...but then again, for anyone wondering how important the timing belt maintenance is to perform on schedule on the 3.5L-powered Challengers and Chargers, take note of this damage. That is pretty much what can happen on an interference engine when it's allowed to interfere with itself. 😲

I am curious though, when the chain jumped ship and the engine imploded, was it pretty much instantaneous? Or did it stumble and die after loping and chugging a few seconds?
Most accounts I've heard was the engine just died at once. Once the valve train goes out sync and valves strike the pistons, the engine is locked up.

since these were the A5 the engine's only connection is the torque converter to the drive line, not a solid physical like a clutch in the M6, the car would coast down and not turn the engine.
Once the engine stopped running the transmission pump stops running.

(its like the illustration that you can't push start an engine with automatic transmission)

There were some instances where it sounded like the engine jumped time and wasn't running and owner shut it down, and damage was minimized (often one bank had bent valves).

But in others where the guide broke and chain either bound up, broke in a matter of seconds, it was all done. Those were instances where both heads had bent valves or even cylinder walls had significant damage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nuke

·
Registered
2016 R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
1,198 Posts
When mine broke I heard two very faint pop pop and that was it. I was in the left lane cc set at 72. Checked no one was behind me, popped it in neutral and coasted to a stop.
 

·
Registered
2014 Shaker Boosted 392 Stroker M6
Joined
·
2,584 Posts
that must be if there was valve / piston contact involved for that price
And that would be a given, and the cam and cam bearings would have to be replaced. And at a minimum, most of the valve stems would get bent, and if a single piston is damaged, the block would probably be toast.
 

·
Premium Member
The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
You're a brave man!

That's exactly why I took my buddy's advice and paid the shop to do the work. Fortunately, when the recall came out a year or so later, FCA sent me a full refund.
Here's the real kicker about that whole mess: I didn't need to replace the alternator at all.

The alternator I pulled out was (and ostensibly still is) working just fine at the time of extraction. I merely thought I might save myself some trouble down the road by replacing it early to avoid getting stranded when it eventually went out on me due to excessive miles.

In hindsight, I do believe that Prohibition was a better idea than my half-baked preventative maintenance attempt...but hey, you know what they say, "Idle hands are the Devil's pork chops", so that 4 day task likely kept me out of trouble for 4 whole days!

I rarely go 4 consecutive days without committing at least 1 Class C misdemeanor, so this was successful on that level at least. 😁
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gila Hemi

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Nope. My car, as configured per its VIN, does not list the P01-Timing Chain service as an applicable recall.

However, my VIN is no longer an accurate indicator for what hardware is on my car. Now that I have a 3.06 rear-end, I meet all the criteria listed in the recall for a car that should have this service done to it:
- car was build within a specific date range: yes
- car has a 5.7L: yes
- car has an auto trans: yes
- car has a 3.xx rear-end: yes, now it does.

😞
The fact you changed the rear does not make it eligible for recall. Recall is based on the equipment that was equipped against the VIN.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I think I may have to take my car in and have the timing chain recall work done to my engine, but I’m pretty sure I will have to pay for the service instead of getting it done gratis as a recall. I know it will be expensive, but I would like an idea of how expensive so I can plan accordingly now.

Does anyone know what the approximate cost of this work (parts plus ~4 hrs labor) might be?

I’m really just looking for a ballpark estimate here; $2,000, $5,000, etc.

Because as much as I love The Bacon Hauler, let’s face it, there is definitely an upper limit to how much money I should be spending on keeping the engine healthy in an 8 year old former cop car with 192K miles on it...
Recalls dont cost anything, call the dealership give them the vin # they will let you know .
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top