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My oil temperature on the highway today was 249 in my 2017 Dodge Challenger rt, I was flooring it but I’m just curious as I never really paid too much attention to oils temps while driving.
Please let me know if I should get it serviced or not. Also if I do what could be my problem?
 

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249 is up there but not unheard of. What were the ambient temps outside? When it's really hot and humid here in Missouri I see mine up in the 230's from time to time. I'm sure I could push that higher if I beat on her...
 

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2011 Challenger RT Classic
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From 540ratblog..............

An ideal oil sump temperature range is between 215*F and 250*F. If your sump temperature runs hotter than this range, you should add an oil cooler, or upgrade your oil cooler, if you already have one. This range is hot enough to quickly boil off the normal condensation that always forms during cold engine start-up, before that water dilutes the oil. And it is also hot enough to NOT promote the formation of sludge, like colder temperatures below the boiling point of water, can.
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And that range is cool enough to do three things:
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1. It is cool enough to keep the oil’s wear protection capability at the highest level achievable by that oil.
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2. It is cool enough to provide critical cooling for engine components, which of course are directly oil cooled. Remember, engine components are only indirectly water cooled.
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3. It is cool enough to keep most oils below their onset of thermal breakdown point.
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But, motor oils do NOT stop working the instant they reach their onset of thermal breakdown point. However, it is not a good idea to run oil above its thermal breakdown point for extended periods of time. Because that will degrade its capability more and more as time/mileage goes on.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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My oil temperature on the highway today was 249 in my 2017 Dodge Challenger rt, I was flooring it but I’m just curious as I never really paid too much attention to oils temps while driving.
Please let me know if I should get it serviced or not. Also if I do what could be my problem?
Short answer is no. While the oil temperature is a bit warm given you were "flooring" the throttle the engine's making a higher percentage of its rated power and this means more heat and the oil will just run hotter than usual.

While 249F is hotter than what you are used to seeing it is not too hot.

Like to point out for 0w-40 the "40" is the oil's high temperature/high sheer index number measured at 212F, which I consider the oil's "working" temperature.

When working the engine "hard" I'd rather see oil temperature at 249F, 37F above 212F rather than 175F or 37F below 212F.

Maybe for prolonged spirited driving or almost certainly for road track usage to keep oil temperature from getting too much higher an oil cooler might be called for.

As an aside some factories arrange to run the engine oil at rather elevated temperatures even when the vehicle is not being pushed that hard. I drove a few Porsche vehicles -- loaners -- when I had one of my Porsche cars in for service/repair -- and my first exposure to a Macan was a bit "scary" as just driving the vehicle normally the oil temperature climbed up to at one point around 250F. I was concerned enough to speak to the service manager about this but he assured me it was ok that Porsche purposely had the oil temperature elevated. I didn't bother to experiment but I suspect had I pushed the vehicle harder there was an oil cooler that would "kick in" and limit the further rise of the oil temperature.

But -- to get back on track -- adding an oil cooler -- unless there is a factory version for your car/engine -- is not just a quick/dirty bolt on. But this is another thread...
 

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Furious Fuchsia 2010 Challenger R/T Classic A5
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"Normal" is usually 220F so about 20 degrees above the water temp. Daily operating temp range though can be 220-250F so it is on the higher side. I doubt you were towing or had a heavy payload inside, so what was the ambient temp and was it just highway cruising or some fun mountain/canyon twisties as well? For reference, when road racing "normal" is ideally 250-280F. How long since your last oil change? Synthetic or dino juice?

If you're concerned enough and want an oil cooler, the Pursuit/392 oil-to-water unit attached between the block and filter would be your easiest and cheapest solution. It's a factory Mopar product that simply reroutes some cool coolant to help take heat away from the oil. Difference between the two? The Pursuit unit uses a barbed thermostat housing to plumb in whereas that hose on the 392 unit goes into the port on front of the water pump (there should be a female hex-head plug there now for burping air out of the system). The lower radiator hose, with a small hose T'd in which goes to the cooler, are also of different diameters due to rad outlet sizes.

Or you could look at the 2007 FrankenCooler thread over on LXForums for a larger auxiliary cooler option. It's an oil-to-air stacked plate unit mounted under/behind the front crash bar and fed via a filter sandwich plate adapter. It was the same concept used later on for the Hellcat oil & transmission coolers.
 
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