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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My husband and I just purchased a 2019 number 082 Challenger Mopar Special Edition. It now has 208 Miles on it and the motor is severely ticking. It was ticking on the way home from the dealership and worsened over a 3 day period. Took it in, new lifters, didn't fix. Garage says the bottom end is bad. Dodge is running us around, and now wants to tear the motor down to see what the problem is. Last Friday, a lady at Dodge in Michigan spoke to "supervisors" reviewing the case and she was told a buy back looked good and we would know by Wednesday at noon. Today, that changed. This is week 3 of being in the garage. Dodge, if you're reading this....you need to understand a few things..
-We purchased a special edition car - If you replace the motor, it is not special or original anymore
-We are in our 50's, waited and worked to buy this car for YEARS! You are killing a dream with your customer service.
-Because of your mistake, we lost our 2014 challenger to trade, a new car we cannot drive and money down.
-We absolutely adore Dodge and have been a faithful customer for many years. I don't want or like a Ford, Chevy, etc. This was my dream car. The coffee table book and birth cert. came in box on Friday and my car is in pieces in a garage.
-This is unbelievable! I have cried everyday and you do not care! Life is hard enough in many other areas right now. this was supposed to be one of the happiest moments for us at this time, but it's not. This is not our fault, this is yours! Own it, and make it right.
Any forum expertise is welcome.
 

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I look at it this way - you have all the documentation of this being a warranty replacement engine.

The tell-tale will be that there is no VIN # etched on the block.

In the old days warranty replacements happened - probably more that someone realizes. The hi-po engines (440 - 6pack and 426 Hemi) were NOT sold with the warranty the other engines had - it was far shorter. This was common practice with Ford, GM and Chrysler.

In some instances there were defective engines - the "warranty replacement" blocks back then didn't have vins, but had a metal riveted tag attached to the block that identified it as such.

The issue of originality with the older collector cars was someone blew the engine or it wore out. Another engine from a different vehicle or an entirely different model was swapped in.

I'd rather have a good engine rather than one that was compromise by an in-field repair that might not be done correctly.

Its not what you planning to have happen - but your replacement engine will have the full warranty just as the original one did for 5 years / 60k
 

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You can't change the fact the car has had to have its engine replaced, if it comes to that and I expect it will come to that.

Save the paperwork that shows the engine was replaced due to no fault of your own.

My advice is to research lemon law in your state and prepare a case just in case. While you probably won't have to lemon the car better to have laid the ground work before hand.

The process of determining if the engine is bad and needs to be replaced is a slow one. The factory can require the techs to do a number of things. No Dodge specific experience but the techs at another dealer brand told me they could recognize a bad engine as soon as the vehicle entered the service area but still had to follow the factory guidelines until the point was reached the factory agreed to send a new engine.

There is really nothing you can do to speed this process up. Just document how long you have been without the car and other things especially those that can be used to have the car declared a lemon.

Eventually the car will be fixed and you'll begin to put this behind you.
 

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Biscuits, I completely sympathize. You paid good money for a special car and Dodge is ruining it for you. Have you looked into your state's lemon law? Don't waste any time, get with a good lemon law attorney now. The first visit is probably free.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for your kind words. In retrospect my post was quite emotional, so I do appreciate it. We will let this play out a bit, and have familiarized ourselves with The lemon law and have an attorney on deck. I think my frustration is the cold treatment from Dodge and their methodology of customer contact. I work for a large truck manufacturer and expect everyone would treat a customer the way I would in this situation. Field service re-build of this motor is not an option in this town, for me. There is quite a difference between a mechanic and a service tech. Skill set. Speaking of that...wonder if Mopar would take it and do the work? Rental car? Hellcat at a discounted price??🤣. Replace this car with another available one? I know, wishful thinking. It certainly would make the customer feel like they were working for you. I’ll keep you updated and thanks for reading.
 

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If you get a replacement engine it will be the same one and it will work so I don't understand the statement of it now being a special edition or original anymore.

I'd rather have a working car and wouldn't care of I needed an engine replacement if it fixes the problem.

That said, I would be frustrated as well with this being a brand new car with issues and they should bend over backwards to make it right and get right on it. So I do understand that and sympathize.
How do these pass final inspections with obvious issues?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If you get a replacement engine it will be the same one and it will work so I don't understand the statement of it now being a special edition or original anymore.

I'd rather have a working car and wouldn't care of I needed an engine replacement if it fixes the problem.

That said, I would be frustrated as well with this being a brand new car with issues and they should bend over backwards to make it right and get right on it. So I do understand that and sympathize.
How do these pass final inspections with obvious issues?
I’m not sure? Don’t imagine the car fax will be good so selling n the future may be interesting.
 

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I’m


I’m not sure? Don’t imagine the car fax will be good so selling n the future may be interesting.
Not to put to fine a point on it but if you bought a car as an investment you need to fire your investment manager.

The CarFax will show an engine replacement -- if it has that much detail and it probably does -- at very low miles.

If you offer the car for sale shortly after the engine replacement that might put someone off the car. At least raise a flag.

But if you offer the car for sale after some "reasonable" span of time it will be price and condition and condition and price that play any real role in how desirable or not the car is.
 

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That's probably true Rockster, but if I am buying a used performance car, I'm not buying the one with a rebuilt or replaced engine done by who knows what mechanic or parts replacer.
 

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I understand the loss of value with a replacement engine but good luck getting FCA to compensate you for it. They'll say our warranty obligations are to repair or replace the engine and that's where it ends. Just the way it is. They might throw in a dealer service or two but if you are expecting much more than that, don't think it's going to happen.



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That's probably true Rockster, but if I am buying a used performance car, I'm not buying the one with a rebuilt or replaced engine done by who knows what mechanic or parts replacer.
It's going to be a warranty replacement, not done at Pep Boys by John the Mechanic
 

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That's probably true Rockster, but if I am buying a used performance car, I'm not buying the one with a rebuilt or replaced engine done by who knows what mechanic or parts replacer.
Rayzaa replied but I'd add just so it is the clear the replacement engine, if it comes to this, comes from the same factory, assembly line, assembler, as the "original" engine. This means the replacement engine is indistinguishable from the original engine except the engine serial number will be different and the replacement engine is not manifesting the behavior that justified replacing the original engine.
 

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If the block isn't damaged, and it is your car, try to insist they keep the old block intact.
 

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If the block isn't damaged, and it is your car, try to insist they keep the old block intact.
Nope.

First the factory almost certainly wants the "old" engine back to determine what went wrong. Then it can under controlled conditions fix the engine. This results in having a replacement engine suitable for a warranty claim should the need arise.

Two the dealer does not have any one really qualified to strip the old engine down to the block, then assemble an engine with the old block as the starting point using a mix of "used" and new parts.

The dealer has no engine dyno the tech could use to verify the engine was at some level operating within spec.

All of the above, and maybe other things, would result in the dealer ignoring the request to keep the old block intact.
 

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It's going to be a warranty replacement, not done at Pep Boys by John the Mechanic
That's true, but how many horror stories have you heard on the forums of botched jobs done at the dealership? Just something as simple as water pump replacements have led to more damage than the original problem. I'm lucky to have a dealer with (so far) competent techs, but that seems to be in the minority from what I am seeing reported.
 

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That's true, but how many horror stories have you heard on the forums of botched jobs done at the dealership? Just something as simple as water pump replacements have led to more damage than the original problem. I'm lucky to have a dealer with (so far) competent techs, but that seems to be in the minority from what I am seeing reported.
I've been fortunate to only have warranty work done twice. A recall and a ticking lifter in my RAM which they replaced them all and no issues since.
 

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Nope.

First the factory almost certainly wants the "old" engine back to determine what went wrong. Then it can under controlled conditions fix the engine. This results in having a replacement engine suitable for a warranty claim should the need arise.

Two the dealer does not have any one really qualified to strip the old engine down to the block, then assemble an engine with the old block as the starting point using a mix of "used" and new parts.

The dealer has no engine dyno the tech could use to verify the engine was at some level operating within spec.

All of the above, and maybe other things, would result in the dealer ignoring the request to keep the old block intact.
Well, I disagree, but it doesn't matter. Only matters if Chrysler agrees. Also it used to be that it didn't have to be a Chrysler garage to do the work for warranty, and I doubt it still is. And I know of many times dealerships rebuild engines, none recently off hand, but not like 1970s either. If they are tearing it down, they can sure put it together.
And I agree with some others that it really doesn't matter much about matching number engine, even on a special model like that one. That is more important on older classics where the matching engine verifies that it actually did come with that engine in the first place, and other options tied to it. Also if it is something that would show up on a carfax, I would find a way to ask for some allowance for loss of value.
Unless it threw a rod, odds are the block is intact.
 

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Well, I disagree, but it doesn't matter. Only matters if Chrysler agrees. Also it used to be that it didn't have to be a Chrysler garage to do the work for warranty, and I doubt it still is. And I know of many times dealerships rebuild engines, none recently off hand, but not like 1970s either. If they are tearing it down, they can sure put it together.
And I agree with some others that it really doesn't matter much about matching number engine, even on a special model like that one. That is more important on older classics where the matching engine verifies that it actually did come with that engine in the first place, and other options tied to it. Also if it is something that would show up on a carfax, I would find a way to ask for some allowance for loss of value.
Unless it threw a rod, odds are the block is intact.
Well, you can disagree but my experience is at least with another brand of car except in two cases -- one involving an engine with excessive ticking the factory ok'd the dealer service department to replace the lifters (and the owner refused to take the car back and the dealer in some accommodated him) and in another case the engine suffered a failed intermediate shaft bearing and the dealer's top mechanic with factory approval tore the engine down and addressed the failed intermediate shaft bearing but not before following the factory guidelines and ensuring no failed bearing metal was in the clean side of the oil system -- in all other cases I was aware of -- maybe 10 in all -- the factory called for the engine to be sent back.

Even in the case of my 2003 Porsche Turbo when the 6-speed transmission developed a selector shaft seal leak and the techs assured me they could very easily address this in house the factory sent over a new transmission -- from Germany via air -- and the old one was sent back to Germany via air. That had to cost some huge sum of Euros.

Added. I also find it funny that -- maybe this doesn't apply to you -- but others arguing for the engine be repaired in the dealer service department when for even the simplest of services many choose to avoid the dealer.

If it were my car I'd much rather get an engine from the factory rather than trust a dealer tech to repair the engine properly. This is not to paint all Dodge techs as inept but a Dodge tech might see an engine to this level just a few times in his career. I would prefer the engine be built or repaired by someone who does this day in and day out.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hopefully, it too will be an older classic someday...that was the point...to leave to my son. Life however changes and a wrap sheet car fax at 200 miles is not ok, doubt we will be compensated for that. I agree with Rocket man and Rockster, I went to school the the “mechanics” here and I can assure you, there is a difference between a service tech and a mechanic. The clock is ticking and we are close. After 30 Days, lemon laws are in effect and paperwork is ready. Experiencing the stages of grief, with today’s mood being pissed! A middle aged, pissed off menopausal woman can be a reckoning force.
 
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