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Hey everyone. So clearly nobody is driving a Challenger to save on fuel costs, but as mine will be a daily driver I was hoping to get some advice. What mods would you guys suggest to SPECIFICALLY improve MPG?
I've learned a ton around here and I feel like I have a good handle on it, but you guys always surprise me with your ideas and depth of knowledge.

Thoughts?
 

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The surest means to save fuel is reducing your commute.

I have a 10 mile commute; I enjoy driving my Challenger to work every day, and couldn't care less when fuel prices start fluctuating.

If I had a 30 miles commute I may not be so indifferent.
 

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Could be a long time before a tuner is out for the 15's, and don't count on MPG improvements with one, my Trinity tuner has no MPG tune. You could buy a taller, skinnier and lighter wheel/tire combo, that will cut rolling resistance and wind drag, rear spoiler delete may cut drag too?
 

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I get better mileage with the higher test gas, around me there is 89,91,and 93 test at some places. The 93 cost a bit more but the engine runs better and I get better mileage
 

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I definitely get better mpg since I switched to premium- no question. But then again I got the car for performance, not fuel economy, and premium was a bonus for better performance.
 

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Hey everyone. So clearly nobody is driving a Challenger to save on fuel costs, but as mine will be a daily driver I was hoping to get some advice. What mods would you guys suggest to SPECIFICALLY improve MPG?
I've learned a ton around here and I feel like I have a good handle on it, but you guys always surprise me with your ideas and depth of knowledge.

Thoughts?
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Best mileage mod? Hmmm....................how about dropping a 3.6L Pentastar in that R/T?.........that'll do it, lol :IThankYou: !!

Regards,

Gary aka "beamg5"
 

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Do you have an auto or manual? If it is an auto, just restrain your right foot and let the MDS run your enhine in 4 cylinder mode. Also, keep your tires fully inflated.
 

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some zero cost suggestions...DON'T put your foot in it, NO heavy acceleration, hard breaking...monthly tire pressure checks, good air filter, good quality gas
 

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Best MPG mod:

1.Your Right foot. Don't mash down on the throttle, don't drive in excess of the speed limit, take the shortest route to your destination. Don't accelerate down hills (don't ride the brake either, just coast).

Personally, I disabled MDS on my R/T, and I do actually the opposite of what I posted above and still manage 18-20 mpg on my 20 mile commute, and 20-24 on my 50 mile drive to the city..
 

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As already mentioned, the largest factor in fuel economy is driving habit. Leave a couple minutes earlier for your commute and slow down. Moderately accelerate from stops, use cruise control on flat roads, hold a constant speed (even up and down hills), coast as long as possible when approaching a stop before applying the brakes, and avoid long idling periods.

Maximum fuel economy is a balance between aerodynamic drag and engine speed. Most engines exhibit peak mechanical efficiency at their peak torque, however this is at full throttle and is not a practical cruising rpm. You will achieve your peak fuel economy at highway speeds, typicall around 55-70 mph depending on the aerodynamics and gearing of the car. As speed doubles, drag quadruples. At 65 mph, my 2014 R/T Classic (with MDS) will net a solid 26 mpg. At 70 mph, the mileage drops to 25.6.

For modifications:

-Remove excess weight from inside vehicle (junk, spare tire, etc.)
-Reduce body weight (carbon fiber or fiberglass parts in place of steel)
-Retain factory aerodynamics (no T/A hood, large spoiler, etc.)
-Lower vehicle (reduces under-body drag and wheel well gap drag)
-Full synthetic fluids (usually worth 1-2 mpg). Differential was factory filled with synthetic, and SRTs received synthetic engine oil.
-Aluminum engine block
-Reduce reciprocating weight (light-weight forged pistons, rods, crank, titanium valves and retainers, etc.)
-Electric water pump
-Underdrive pulleys (be careful with these)
-Headers
-High-flow catalytic converters
-Free-flowing exhaust
-Cold/free-flowing air intake
-Reduce driver weight
-Lower windows for cooling air at lower speeds and use A/C at higher speeds
-When using A/C, use re-circulation mode (will reduce compressor clutch cycling)
-Install low rolling resistance tires
-Ensure tire inflation pressure is per door decal

Don't waste your money on a tune, as these are designed for maximum power, not fuel economy. The engine is basically a large air pump. Removing any restrictions and friction will net an increase in mileage. The factory did a fantastic job with this already, but items such as headers and a less restrictive intake system will net an increase in power and mileage. Fuel economy ratings are a huge factor in today's new car segment, and the manufacturers invest millions in research and development to achieve maximum fuel economy for each vehicle, so there isn't much that will net a large gain in a single modification. While performing these modifications, keep cost in mind. You can easily spend tens of thousands of dollars in the above modifications, which will never be recouped in fuel savings unless you keep your car for life.

If you would like real-time driver feedback, Autometer and several other manufacturers produce a fuel economy gauge, which is nothing more than a vacuum gauge with some color bands to provide driver-feedback on their throttle useage. Using the vacuum/fuel economy gauge, find the cruising speed that nets the highest steady-state vacuum reading and that's your peak fuel economy cruise speed. If you prefer digital, try a ScanGaugeE (ScanGaugeE : Linear Logic - Home of the ScanGauge).
 

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The surest means to save fuel is reducing your commute.

I have a 10 mile commute; I enjoy driving my Challenger to work every day, and couldn't care less when fuel prices start fluctuating.

If I had a 30 miles commute I may not be so indifferent.
Same here.

I bought my Challenger to enjoy driving it, with the understanding that the price to pay is relatively poor fuel economy for a daily driver. On the other hand, the inline-six cylinder Jeep Grand Cherokee that I had been driving was about the same in terms of fuel consumption, if not a little worse, so I feel as though I've come out way ahead.
 

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When considering any mods for the purpose of increasing fuel economy, we need to be careful to balance the net savings in fuel cost versus the cost of the mods themselves. It makes no sense to spend a dollar to save a dime.
 

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Same as above for me. Its my weekend car/ sunny day car. Or when I want to toy around.

I have a Honda pilot for the FAM and I own a Honda accord (4 banger) for daily stuff.

If I was daily driving the rt . I would probably have to be single with no kids. I can only imagine the fuel costs ;p
 

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I am a little disappointed, thhat Dodge doesn't offer the "long" 2,62 Rear Axle in the Hemi A8.
Due tu short "small" gears of the A8, acceleration wouldn't suffer, but highway mileage would be affected in a positively, especially at higher speeds.

Fuel Economy is here in Europe a big issue, because of expensive gas.
 

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It's always been the "little things" that have helped my MPG

Tire pressure is a biggie though...recommended PSI or slightly higher will help

SLOWLY accelerating, shifting at the lowest RPM possible

Braking well ahead of a traffic light, trying to time it so you don't have to accelerate from a stop (where MPG is worst)

NOT driving too much over the highway speed limit...75 MPH will be MUCH worse MPG than 65 MPG

There's more, including what the others have mentioned, but this is what's helped me most
 
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