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I ran across this list of best ways to warm-up your car and thought that it would interest you guys.

Here they are:

1. Driving Warms your car faster than idling.


If your concern is not the health of the car, but simply your own creature comforts, Bob Aldrich of the California Energy Commission points out that "idling is not actually an effective way to warm up a car — it warms up faster if you just drive it."
The coming electric cars, such as the Nissan Leaf, will incorporate a wonderful feature that allows the owner to use a cellphone to tell the car (which is plugged into the grid) to pre-warm or pre-cool the interior. No idling necessary.


2. Ten seconds is all you need.


Environmental Defense Fund, which produced the Idling Gets You Nowhere campaign, advises motorists to turn off their ignition if they're sitting stopped for more than 10 seconds.
"After about 10 seconds, you waste more money running the engine than restarting it, said Andy Darrell, deputy director of the EDF Energy Program. "Switch the car off at the curb, and you'll be leaving money in your wallet and protecting the air in your community."


3. Idling hurts the car.


According to the Hinkle Charitable Foundation's Anti-Idling Primer, idling forces an engine "to operate in a very inefficient and gasoline-rich mode that, over time, can degrade the engine's performance and reduce mileage."
The Campaign for an Idle-Free New York City points out that idling causes carbon residues to build up inside the engine, which reduces its efficiency.


4. Idling costs money.


Over a year of five minutes of daily idling (which causes incomplete combustion of fuel), the "Anti-Idling Primer" estimates that the operator of a V8-engine car will waste 20 gallons of gasoline, which not only produces 440 pounds of carbon dioxide but costs at least $60.



5. Idling in the garage can kill you.


Idling a car in a garage, even with the door open, is dangerous and exposes the driver to carbon monoxide and other noxious gases. If the garage is attached, those fumes can also enter the house.

6. Block Heaters beat remote starters


Lori Strothard of the Waterloo Citizens Vehicle Idling Reduction Task Force in Canada says, "Remote starters can too easily cause people to warm up their cars for 5 to 15 minutes, which is generally unnecessary."
A block heater, which is designed to heat the engine and can cost under $30, on a timer set to start one to two hours before driving, does the trick in very cold climates.
 

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Agreed! I usually let my car warm up for about 10 seconds and then start driving. I noticed years ago that driving it it will warm up quicker. Makes sense because the engine is working harder and creating more heat. I have always thought of the remote starters as a waste of fuel myself.
 

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I disagree with the idling, on my V-6 Toyota FJ I had a Scan gauge II, idle burned @ 0.4 gallons per hour...or maybe lower, can't remember, but it was nothing, maybe our hemis are different, but the Toyota engines sure idle fine....
 

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I ran across this list of best ways to warm-up your car and thought that it would interest you guys.

Here they are:

1. Driving Warms your car faster than idling.


If your concern is not the health of the car, but simply your own creature comforts, Bob Aldrich of the California Energy Commission points out that "idling is not actually an effective way to warm up a car — it warms up faster if you just drive it."
The coming electric cars, such as the Nissan Leaf, will incorporate a wonderful feature that allows the owner to use a cellphone to tell the car (which is plugged into the grid) to pre-warm or pre-cool the interior. No idling necessary.


2. Ten seconds is all you need.


Environmental Defense Fund, which produced the Idling Gets You Nowhere campaign, advises motorists to turn off their ignition if they're sitting stopped for more than 10 seconds.
"After about 10 seconds, you waste more money running the engine than restarting it, said Andy Darrell, deputy director of the EDF Energy Program. "Switch the car off at the curb, and you'll be leaving money in your wallet and protecting the air in your community."


3. Idling hurts the car.


According to the Hinkle Charitable Foundation's Anti-Idling Primer, idling forces an engine "to operate in a very inefficient and gasoline-rich mode that, over time, can degrade the engine's performance and reduce mileage."
The Campaign for an Idle-Free New York City points out that idling causes carbon residues to build up inside the engine, which reduces its efficiency.


4. Idling costs money.


Over a year of five minutes of daily idling (which causes incomplete combustion of fuel), the "Anti-Idling Primer" estimates that the operator of a V8-engine car will waste 20 gallons of gasoline, which not only produces 440 pounds of carbon dioxide but costs at least $60.



5. Idling in the garage can kill you.


Idling a car in a garage, even with the door open, is dangerous and exposes the driver to carbon monoxide and other noxious gases. If the garage is attached, those fumes can also enter the house.

6. Block Heaters beat remote starters


Lori Strothard of the Waterloo Citizens Vehicle Idling Reduction Task Force in Canada says, "Remote starters can too easily cause people to warm up their cars for 5 to 15 minutes, which is generally unnecessary."
A block heater, which is designed to heat the engine and can cost under $30, on a timer set to start one to two hours before driving, does the trick in very cold climates.
If our cars didn't ever have the freezing window problem, I agree with the article.

On another note, when it 0- 20 degrees outside and your car is parked outdoors 24/7, it can be nice to get into a warm car(mine is warm within fifteen minutes of idling)....even though I know I wasted a lot of gas doing so but I'm willing to accept the trade off.
 

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I believe the difference being described is to allow the oil to warm before applying a load to the engine which then allows reduced friction upon load application when the oil is more able (more viscous) to reduce friction. Apply a load immediately and there is more friction due to the poor viscosity of oil at -20deg.
 

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Some good points. I do prefer to let the oil circulate for a few, then drive it easy until I hit the main highway. I just don't like the idea of putting too much of a load or shock to the drivetrain when tolerances are at their closest.

Jack
 

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ya drive a diesel and don't idle, see what happens.

I start my diesel, put the E-brake on and put it in neutral to get the transmission fluids moving also.
 

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6. Block Heaters beat remote starters

My 6.1 starts and runs beautifully in single-digit (F) temperatures.

What I want is a manual transmission warmer...:lol:

The 6060 sucks when it's that cold. :brickwall:
 

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I often wonder how much of this is true and how much is made up or embellished by the environmentalists? I let my car warm up to 170 before driving, I can feel the difference in both how warm the car is and how much smoother my 6 speed shifts. Sure driving the car warms it up quicker. But it takes a good while for my car to spit out warm air, thats on a short trip (less than 5 miles) I finally get warm air, and im almost at my destination. When I let it warm up for 5-10 min, ITs still not warm, But it only takes a couple blocks of driving to get warm air. Lets the heated seats warm up too. I love the remote start that came factory on my yukon. Click the button before I get in the shower, get out, get dressed, pour my coffee, in the truck and my seats are warm, and the cabin is warm. Im happy to burn a little gas to be more relaxed and comfortable. I mean, cars burn so clean these days the idling I do doesnt hurt one bit. I cant smell any exhaust when its running (How ever it bellows smoke).
 

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warm oil will let it flow better. thats why oil pressure drops as it warms up. Also, a warm up engine has all its components sized better so theres less slop which can increase wear. for instance a piston will grow as its heated so it will fir the bore better and it wont rock as much in the bore. the rocking piston kind of beats the **** out of the cylinder wall. A warmed up (properly sized) piston will remain more straight in the bore and not rock back and forth killing its skirt or the cylinder wall or wearing the rings funny.

plus the warm oil flows better keeping a nice boundary layer over all the bearing surfaces.

will any of this matter?? maybe. Some people see 300,000 miles on a motor. others see 175,000. of course driving habits have a lot to do with this. so does maintenance. Drive a car at higher rpms and its like driving more miles in a car at lower rpm. its all relative
 

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This is what I do:

Start engine and immediately back out of the garage. As soon as I confirm the garage door is closed, I drive off using light throttle pressure. I keep the throttle pressure light and accelerate gradually until the car comes up to normal operating temperature.

I used this same technique with my last car. When I pulled the valve cover @ 170,000 miles to check the valve lash, it looked brand new inside.
 

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Man....!.......us DWB guys think alike! I swore I wrote what you did! i do exactly as you describe! I have about 1/2mile in my neighborhood until I hit the 50mph zone road. That 1/2 mile is never over about 15mph. No throttle.
 

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I just get in and press the heated seats button. don't even bother with the heater in winter. In less than 5 minutes the seats are warm and toasty. If i lived up north where it was really cold, (like south dakota where i was before florida) I'd use a dip stick heater to heat up the oil in the oil pan. That always made startups very simple even in frigid cold.
Other than on very cold days, i do not warm up the car before driving, i just start it, make sure the garage door is open, then back out and on my way. My cars always seem to age well. As long as oil changes are regular, and you keep fluids topped off.
 

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winter driving

I ran across this list of best ways to warm-up your car and thought that it would interest you guys.

Here they are:

1. Driving Warms your car faster than idling.


If your concern is not the health of the car, but simply your own creature comforts, Bob Aldrich of the California Energy Commission points out that "idling is not actually an effective way to warm up a car — it warms up faster if you just drive it."
The coming electric cars, such as the Nissan Leaf, will incorporate a wonderful feature that allows the owner to use a cellphone to tell the car (which is plugged into the grid) to pre-warm or pre-cool the interior. No idling necessary.


2. Ten seconds is all you need.


Environmental Defense Fund, which produced the Idling Gets You Nowhere campaign, advises motorists to turn off their ignition if they're sitting stopped for more than 10 seconds.
"After about 10 seconds, you waste more money running the engine than restarting it, said Andy Darrell, deputy director of the EDF Energy Program. "Switch the car off at the curb, and you'll be leaving money in your wallet and protecting the air in your community."


3. Idling hurts the car.


According to the Hinkle Charitable Foundation's Anti-Idling Primer, idling forces an engine "to operate in a very inefficient and gasoline-rich mode that, over time, can degrade the engine's performance and reduce mileage."
The Campaign for an Idle-Free New York City points out that idling causes carbon residues to build up inside the engine, which reduces its efficiency.


4. Idling costs money.


Over a year of five minutes of daily idling (which causes incomplete combustion of fuel), the "Anti-Idling Primer" estimates that the operator of a V8-engine car will waste 20 gallons of gasoline, which not only produces 440 pounds of carbon dioxide but costs at least $60.



5. Idling in the garage can kill you.


Idling a car in a garage, even with the door open, is dangerous and exposes the driver to carbon monoxide and other noxious gases. If the garage is attached, those fumes can also enter the house.

6. Block Heaters beat remote starters


Lori Strothard of the Waterloo Citizens Vehicle Idling Reduction Task Force in Canada says, "Remote starters can too easily cause people to warm up their cars for 5 to 15 minutes, which is generally unnecessary."
A block heater, which is designed to heat the engine and can cost under $30, on a timer set to start one to two hours before driving, does the trick in very cold climates.
While I agree with what is stated,real world facts of driving have to be taken into consideration/I"m speaking of any kind of vehicle and the climate you drive in/in northern Ontario and western Canada during the winter months no block heater and battery blanket come morning your not going anywhere its that simple,The big 3 test cars in Cold Lake Alberta for
a good reason,theres no more harsh winter climate anywhere in North America.Having clean engine oil in the crank case during the winter months makes a HUGE difference on the life span of a engine and synthetics under lab and extreme cold conditions at Cold Lake prove they work better.Sythentic oil works better by the simple fact it flows better than convential oil therefore your engine oil heats up quicker,and most cars now are fuel injected not a carb with a choke set up :bigthumb:
 
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