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Discussion Starter #1
Noticed a coolant leak on my 2016 Scat Pack. I Had vehicle towed to dealer. The dealer discovered a blown head gasket. The vehicle has 29,000 miles. The dealer said they will inspect the motor and decide the next steps. Should I expect a motor replacement, would a head gasket be a sufficient fix that I would not have to worry about motor issues later?
 

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A head gasket replacement isn't a big deal and when correctly done will restore the engine to pre failure condition.

The real question is, why did the head gasket fail. It's unlikely that you will get an engine replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A head gasket replacement isn't a big deal and when correctly done will restore the engine to pre failure condition.

The real question is, why did the head gasket fail. It's unlikely that you will get an engine replacement.
I hear that once a head gasket blows there is almost a guarantee water/antifreeze gets in the motor and will cause internal damage to numerous parts that cannot be inspected unless the entire motor is broken down.
 

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No you will not be getting a new motor.
 

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Having a blown head gasket is like having a blown fuse in a circuit. It's the result of something else that went wrong, and not the actual problem. Did the engine get really hot? Is the head warped? Before they just slap a new head gasket in and send you on your way, they better determine why it happened so it doesn't happen again, with worse consequences.
 

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Noticed a coolant leak on my 2016 Scat Pack. I Had vehicle towed to dealer. The dealer discovered a blown head gasket. The vehicle has 29,000 miles. The dealer said they will inspect the motor and decide the next steps. Should I expect a motor replacement, would a head gasket be a sufficient fix that I would not have to worry about motor issues later?
Hi Keron270,

We are terribly sorry to hear that your Challenger has a blown head gasket. Please message us with your VIN so that we can document this further and provide additional assistance while your vehicle is in service.

Darlene
Dodge Social Care Specialist
 

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I hear that once a head gasket blows there is almost a guarantee water/antifreeze gets in the motor and will cause internal damage to numerous parts that cannot be inspected unless the entire motor is broken down.
There is a risk with a head gasket leak any coolant leak that can have coolant in the cylinders that the anti-freeze component of the coolant can form a glaze on the cast iron cylinder walls and ruin ring/cylinder seal.

This doesn't happen immediately it takes some time which is why if a coolant leak is suspected, if a head gasket leak is suspected, the engine should not be run and the car taken in to have this diagnosed and repaired.

It reads like you were quite observant and avoided driving the car and got it in -- and having it towed in vs. driving it in -- for a diagnosis and repair.

With the head off the tech can determine if any cylinders receiving any coolant and check for glaze but the odds are long there is none.

The other concern is why the leak. Bad gasket? Improperly torqued head bolts? Cracked head? Warped head? Warped block? A warped block is rare. A warped (or cracked) head less rare but still not that common.

The tech should have in his tool box a precision straight edge -- when I was working on engines I had a nice Snap On precision straight edge -- with which he can check the head for any warp. The factory service manual should diagram how the head should be checked: lengthwise, and at diagonals; and provide the maximum thickness of feeler gauge that can fit under the straight edge.

If the head is found to not be within spec it can be resurfaced -- with the automotive machine shop taking off just enough material to bring the head into spec -- or if the engine is under warranty the factory may (probably will) elect to replace the head. 'course, a cracked head would be replaced. In some cases welding (brazing) can be used to fix a crack in a head but I don't think the factory would go this route.

The tech will check the block deck -- where the head bolts -- for out of flatness/straightness conditions. I would be surprised if any was found. Block deck resurfacing is possible but the engine must be removed from the car and the engine disassembled down to the bare/naked block which is then sent out for machining and afterwards proper cleaning.

In the event the block deck was not straight more than likely the factory would just replace the engine.

There is another risk to a leaking head gasket. The head and block where the leak is can erode -- if the leak is ignored for a while -- and even if the head and block are straight the bit of metal erosion can result in the next head gasket failing. If the erosion is very slight then as I described above the head (and block deck) can be resurfaced but if this condition exists replacement is the more likely solution.

The engine oil should be drained and replaced and the engine oil filter replaced. Were the engine mine I'd run the engine up to operating temperature with the fresh oil/filter then replace the oil and filter again and drive the car a while -- 100, 250, 500 miles? -- and then replace the oil/filter one more time. (The factory probably has guidelines for this so my numbers are just what I'd do based on no official input from the factory.) This it to remove any oil that is contaminated with anti-freeze.

The odds are very high the engine will come away from this experience with no after effects and deliver a long and trouble free service life.

Of course afterwards you will drive the car and should you notice any abnormal behavior, a CEL, anything out of the ordinary, get the car back into service to investigate this behavior, or CEL or whatever.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Noticed a coolant leak on my 2016 Scat Pack. I Had vehicle towed to dealer. The dealer discovered a blown head gasket. The vehicle has 29,000 miles. The dealer said they will inspect the motor and decide the next steps. Should I expect a motor replacement, would a head gasket be a sufficient fix that I would not have to worry about motor issues later?
Hi Keron270,

We are terribly sorry to hear that your Challenger has a blown head gasket. Please message us with your VIN so that we can document this further and provide additional assistance while your vehicle is in service.

Darlene
Dodge Social Care Specialist
2C3CDZFJ3GH137112

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I hear that once a head gasket blows there is almost a guarantee water/antifreeze gets in the motor and will cause internal damage to numerous parts that cannot be inspected unless the entire motor is broken down.
There is a risk with a head gasket leak any coolant leak that can have coolant in the cylinders that the anti-freeze component of the coolant can form a glaze on the cast iron cylinder walls and ruin ring/cylinder seal.

This doesn't happen immediately it takes some time which is why if a coolant leak is suspected, if a head gasket leak is suspected, the engine should not be run and the car taken in to have this diagnosed and repaired.

It reads like you were quite observant and avoided driving the car and got it in -- and having it towed in vs. driving it in -- for a diagnosis and repair.

With the head off the tech can determine if any cylinders receiving any coolant and check for glaze but the odds are long there is none.

The other concern is why the leak. Bad gasket? Improperly torqued head bolts? Cracked head? Warped head? Warped block? A warped block is rare. A warped (or cracked) head less rare but still not that common.

The tech should have in his tool box a precision straight edge -- when I was working on engines I had a nice Snap On precision straight edge -- with which he can check the head for any warp. The factory service manual should diagram how the head should be checked: lengthwise, and at diagonals; and provide the maximum thickness of feeler gauge that can fit under the straight edge.

If the head is found to not be within spec it can be resurfaced -- with the automotive machine shop taking off just enough material to bring the head into spec -- or if the engine is under warranty the factory may (probably will) elect to replace the head. 'course, a cracked head would be replaced. In some cases welding (brazing) can be used to fix a crack in a head but I don't think the factory would go this route.

The tech will check the block deck -- where the head bolts -- for out of flatness/straightness conditions. I would be surprised if any was found. Block deck resurfacing is possible but the engine must be removed from the car and the engine disassembled down to the bare/naked block which is then sent out for machining and afterwards proper cleaning.

In the event the block deck was not straight more than likely the factory would just replace the engine.

There is another risk to a leaking head gasket. The head and block where the leak is can erode -- if the leak is ignored for a while -- and even if the head and block are straight the bit of metal erosion can result in the next head gasket failing. If the erosion is very slight then as I described above the head (and block deck) can be resurfaced but if this condition exists replacement is the more likely solution.

The engine oil should be drained and replaced and the engine oil filter replaced. Were the engine mine I'd run the engine up to operating temperature with the fresh oil/filter then replace the oil and filter again and drive the car a while -- 100, 250, 500 miles? -- and then replace the oil/filter one more time. (The factory probably has guidelines for this so my numbers are just what I'd do based on no official input from the factory.) This it to remove any oil that is contaminated with anti-freeze.

The odds are very high the engine will come away from this experience with no after effects and deliver a long and trouble free service life.

Of course afterwards you will drive the car and should you notice any abnormal behavior, a CEL, anything out of the ordinary, get the car back into service to investigate this behavior, or CEL or whatever.
Thank you for the breakdown. To sum it up, if properly inspected and repaired I should not have any issues later down the road?
 

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2C3CDZFJ3GH137112

Thank you!
Hi Keron270,

Thank you for providing your VIN. Please private message us with moving forward, as we do not recommend sharing private information publicly. Please fill out the following information at your earliest convenience through a private message:
Phone number:
Earliest/latest call time:
Updates via Text: Y/N
Updates via Email: Y/N (Email address)
Dealer:
Are you currently in a rental?
Rental start date:

Darlene
Dodge Social Care Specialist
 

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Thank you for the breakdown. To sum it up, if properly inspected and repaired I should not have any issues later down the road?
In short yes. You are not the first to have a leaking head gasket and the steps to ensure a proper repair are well known. In the case of a car under warranty almost certainly if there is any question about the head at all it will be replaced. It is unlikely the block has been affected or is anything more than an innocent party but the factory has procedure in place to address this possibility.

As for head replacement, the factory I'm sure prefers to rely upon its processes -- the manufacturing of the heads -- to ensure a good head. While resurfacing can be done this is out of the factory's control and I'm pretty sure the factory doesn't relish this. The factory would essentially be warranting another business's work.

Now when you get the car back carefully note the coolant level when cold. Drive the car. Get the engine nice and hot. This does not mean take the car out and thrash it. I can get a car plenty hot with the A/C off and just driving around town obeying all traffic laws. This kind of usage can have the radiator fans running (which with my previous cars would occur at 212F).

If you want at home in your driveway raise engine RPMs to say 1K and hold until you or a helper confirms the radiator fan(s) is (are) on. Lower RPMs and turn off the engine.

The heat load will raise coolant temperature above 212F (or at whatever temperature the coolant is when the radiator fan is switched on) and this increases pressure.

With pressure and heat is when a cooling system is mostly likely to leak.

(Some years back I did this "test" with one of my cars. Just a minute or two after I shut off the engine the coolant tank gushed hot coolant out a split along the mold seam in the tank bottom. I let the car cool overnight and then added nearly a gallon of distilled water the next day. No leak. Started engine. No leak. Drove car a couple of miles to the dealer with nary a leak sign. Cold/cool maybe even warm that coolant tank would have managed to hold. Heat and pressure is the real test of a cooling system's pressure/fluid tightness integrity.)

Assuming no leaks appear, let the car cool down completely then recheck the coolant level. It should *not* have have changed. If it has gone down this may be a sign of a leak but depending upon how the cooling system was refilled after the head gasket repair/fix it might just be some normal drop due to an air pocket/bubble somewhere. Add distilled water if you want or top the cooling system up with a mix of the *correct* antifreeze and distilled water (in 50/50 ratio).

Then note the level and run the same test as described above again. This time if the level is down there's a leak and you should take the car back and have this found and fixed.

However I don't expect a leak. Over the years I've had a number of cars in for cooling system leaks: Leaking radiator (or radiators: My Porsche Turbo had all 3 radiators develop leaks concurrently: you don't want to know what this cost to address...), failed intake manifold (which had coolant passages in it), water pump, damaged radiator (hit a tire carcass), leaking coolant tank (I mentioned above), and I never had to bring back any car for any reason. Fixed the first time and fixed right.
 

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There is a risk with a head gasket leak any coolant leak that can have coolant in the cylinders that the anti-freeze component of the coolant can form a glaze on the cast iron cylinder walls and ruin ring/cylinder seal.

This doesn't happen immediately it takes some time which is why if a coolant leak is suspected, if a head gasket leak is suspected, the engine should not be run and the car taken in to have this diagnosed and repaired.

It reads like you were quite observant and avoided driving the car and got it in -- and having it towed in vs. driving it in -- for a diagnosis and repair.

With the head off the tech can determine if any cylinders receiving any coolant and check for glaze but the odds are long there is none.

The other concern is why the leak. Bad gasket? Improperly torqued head bolts? Cracked head? Warped head? Warped block? A warped block is rare. A warped (or cracked) head less rare but still not that common.

The tech should have in his tool box a precision straight edge -- when I was working on engines I had a nice Snap On precision straight edge -- with which he can check the head for any warp. The factory service manual should diagram how the head should be checked: lengthwise, and at diagonals; and provide the maximum thickness of feeler gauge that can fit under the straight edge.

If the head is found to not be within spec it can be resurfaced -- with the automotive machine shop taking off just enough material to bring the head into spec -- or if the engine is under warranty the factory may (probably will) elect to replace the head. 'course, a cracked head would be replaced. In some cases welding (brazing) can be used to fix a crack in a head but I don't think the factory would go this route.

The tech will check the block deck -- where the head bolts -- for out of flatness/straightness conditions. I would be surprised if any was found. Block deck resurfacing is possible but the engine must be removed from the car and the engine disassembled down to the bare/naked block which is then sent out for machining and afterwards proper cleaning.

In the event the block deck was not straight more than likely the factory would just replace the engine.

There is another risk to a leaking head gasket. The head and block where the leak is can erode -- if the leak is ignored for a while -- and even if the head and block are straight the bit of metal erosion can result in the next head gasket failing. If the erosion is very slight then as I described above the head (and block deck) can be resurfaced but if this condition exists replacement is the more likely solution.

The engine oil should be drained and replaced and the engine oil filter replaced. Were the engine mine I'd run the engine up to operating temperature with the fresh oil/filter then replace the oil and filter again and drive the car a while -- 100, 250, 500 miles? -- and then replace the oil/filter one more time. (The factory probably has guidelines for this so my numbers are just what I'd do based on no official input from the factory.) This it to remove any oil that is contaminated with anti-freeze.

The odds are very high the engine will come away from this experience with no after effects and deliver a long and trouble free service life.

Of course afterwards you will drive the car and should you notice any abnormal behavior, a CEL, anything out of the ordinary, get the car back into service to investigate this behavior, or CEL or whatever.
This is good info, highlighting the fact there are many variables to consider. Stay alert! It will work out. Darlene sounds great!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Update: I recived a call from dealer. They said they sent head off to machine shop and all was well and must have been a faulty gasket. They are putting it all back together now.
 

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Hey!

How is your Challenger now? I am experiencing the exact same problem with my vehicle (2016 Challenger Scat). Overhear, thought it was coolants, had it towed to the dealership, and they discovered it was a head gasket problem. It's now in the dealership and they say I would have to rent out of pocket. This vehicle has under 19,000 miles on it and has been taken care of and babied.

It sucks.

I would much rather get a new engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sorry to hear that. So far it’s been fine. I tried to play the new motor card, as a few of the other members said in this post, they aren’t going to replace motor unless they find motor damage. They sent mine out to a machine shop for inspection and it came back fine. As far as the rental goes they wouldn’t give me one either. I really Didn’t need it since I have other vehicles. I had Warranty work done on my Durango and they gave me a rental with no problem, that was a different dealer ?. Either way you will be taken care of by getting a new motor or gasket. Most likely a gasket.
 
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