Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sorry if this sounds like a noob question but I've never bled brakes before. I've only replaced pads and rotors without disconnecting the caliper from the brake line.

In a few weeks I'm hoping to strip the existing paint off of my calipers and repaint them. In order to do the job properly I'd like to completely remove the calipers so that I can also access the other brake parts that have paint sprayed on them. Once I disconnect the line from the back of the caliper I'm wondering if the brake system needs bled? Or if you're doing one caliper at a time can you just reconnect the line and tighten it down? If I understand correctly the danger is getting air sucked into the system but I'm wondering if that only happens once the brake pedal has been pressed and then released?

I'd appreciate any pointers you guys can give me. Also, is there anything about the Challenger's calipers or brake system that is significantly different than any other brake system? I'm assuming the only bolts holding it on are the normal top and bottom bolts as well as the brake line bolt?

Thanks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Anyone...? Anyone...? Bueller...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,412 Posts
....I guess everyone is too busy debating autos vs. manuals, "up-badging" and otherwise trying to insult one another. If folks could only devote that engergy to something constructive, this site/community would be a much better place to visit.

You will need to re-bleed the system after disconnecting the calipers (even if it's one by one). Air will be in the caliper and the line. Wish I could help you with any differences in this system vs. others but I don't have my factory manual yet and haven't had a need to research the topic for this application. There are other boards that have technical information on the LX platform that you may find useful though. Concerns off of the top of my head might be the ABS system and definitely the master cylinder if you get air in those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
....I guess everyone is too busy debating autos vs. manuals, "up-badging" and otherwise trying to insult one another. If folks could only devote that engergy to something constructive, this site/community would be a much better place to visit.

You will need to re-bleed the system after disconnecting the calipers (even if it's one by one). Air will be in the caliper and the line. Wish I could help you with any differences in this system vs. others but I don't have my factory manual yet and haven't had a need to research the topic for this application. There are other boards that have technical information on the LX platform that you may find useful though. Concerns off of the top of my head might be the ABS system and definitely the master cylinder if you get air in those.
Your first paragraph should be required reading here!! 100% agreed on what you said.

And thanks for the helpful reply. If bleeding is necessary does that mean I'd need to start with the caliper farthest from the master cylinder and work my way to the closest? Or does it not matter? I guess I just need instruction on how to go about bleeding the system. Like whether I need to bleed after each caliper is reattached or after all 4 have been reattached.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,412 Posts
And thanks for the helpful reply. If bleeding is necessary does that mean I'd need to start with the caliper farthest from the master cylinder and work my way to the closest? Or does it not matter? I guess I just need instruction on how to go about bleeding the system. Like whether I need to bleed after each caliper is reattached or after all 4 have been reattached.
I know there is a general logic like that for bleeding brakes but I usually just go off of the manufacturer's recommended procedure.

EDIT: ....found this:

http://www.challengertalk.com/forums/f5/help-brake-bleeding-28718/
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,540 Posts
The best way is to have the vehicle pressure bled by a shop or dealer, but if a pressure bleeder isn't available then you and a buddy can do the job. You should start with the RR then LR then RF then LF. Check the master cylinder level often while bleeding. On this car it also seems to help to have the key in the "ON" position at least with mine it did.

Jack
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,972 Posts
+1 on Jack's posting.

The car's ignition must be "on" (engine doesn't need to be running) so that the ABS pump energizes, since it needs to be functioning to bleed the system.

A power bleeder is the preferable (and much faster) way to bleed the hydraulic system. Be careful not to splatter brake fluid on paint - it will eat the paint. Eye protection is another point to consider as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the info guys. That link is very helpful too!

Unfortunately I have no idea what that article means when it says the ABS system must be bled separately. I've never heard of that before. Any ideas on that? And which position does the key need to be in? It seems to be there's 2 different positions. One position when barely turned and another when you're about to start the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,532 Posts
dude, just dont disconnect them. it isnt necessary and the bleeding will be problematic without the scan tool.

DONT DO IT. just paint them while they are still connected
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top