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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen a couple of old threads about brake bleeding but I still have a couple of questions. I understand the theory but I've never actually bled brakes before, which is kinda surprising because I've done all my own maintenance on all my cars (I'm confident I can do it), I've just never needed to bleed my brakes...
Anyway, I understand you start with the RR tire and then the LR and you should raise the rear end, so I plan on just backing up on my ramps and doing the rear. Question: when I move to the front tires should I put the front tires up on the ramps too? It would def make the job easier...
Second question: I saw a few people talking about needing to bleed the ABS system as well. I've never heard of that before, is that something that really needs to be done?
I was planning on getting one of those cheap $10 "one man brake bleed" kits you can get from Autozone so I don't have to have my gf out there pumping the pedal for me, anyone use one of those? Thanks in advance!
 

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What is the reason for the bleed, air in the line(s), or just a drain and fill of the car’s brake fluid as preventative maintenance?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What is the reason for the bleed, air in the line(s), or just a drain and fill of the car’s brake fluid as preventative maintenance?
Ever since I got the car 6 months ago the brakes have always felt a little "soft" to me, so I just want to make sure there's no air in the lines. There probably isn't any air in there, but for peace of mind I want to check.
 

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Ever since I got the car 6 months ago the brakes have always felt a little "soft" to me, so I just want to make sure there's no air in the lines. There probably isn't any air in there, but for peace of mind I want to check.
Here’s a link to a write up I did about flushing the fluid as preventative maintenance:


Since then I have done the same on my Charger and just two days ago I changed the front calipers on my Charger, so it’s not as easy to mess up as one might believe (the link maintenance was the first time I had done a bleed as well). Take your time and go slow, keeping the alcohol consumption to a minimum and you will be fine.

In answer to your original questions -

1) go ahead and do that if it will make it easier. It certainly won’t hurt.

2) I’ve tried the devices you are talking about and they seem to be more trouble than they’re worth IMHO. Maybe I’m just dense and wasn’t using them correctly, but I say you can do it on your own just as easily.

Also, a 36” breaker bar with a 5” ext on it can be used to apply and hold the brake pedal if wedged against it with the driver’s seat and moved forward/backward with the electronic seat controls. That is what I’ve done the last two times to enable me to not bother the wife for brake pedal duties.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here’s a link to a write up I did about flushing the fluid as preventative maintenance:


Since then I have done the same on my Charger and just two days ago I changed the front calipers on my Charger, so it’s not as easy to mess up as one might believe (the link maintenance was the first time I had done a bleed as well). Take your time and go slow, keeping the alcohol consumption to a minimum and you will be fine.

In answer to your original questions -

1) go ahead and do that if it will make it easier. It certainly won’t hurt.

2) I’ve tried the devices you are talking about and they seem to be more trouble than they’re worth IMHO. Maybe I’m just dense and wasn’t using them correctly, but I say you can do it on your own just as easily.

Also, a 36” breaker bar with a 5” ext on it can be used to apply and hold the brake pedal if wedged against it with the driver’s seat and moved forward/backward with the electronic seat controls. That is what I’ve done the last two times to enable me to not bother the wife for brake pedal duties.
Excellent write up, thanks
 

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Be careful with spillage. That brake fluid likes to eat up caliper paint...or any paint for that matter.
 

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I've seen a couple of old threads about brake bleeding but I still have a couple of questions. I understand the theory but I've never actually bled brakes before, which is kinda surprising because I've done all my own maintenance on all my cars (I'm confident I can do it), I've just never needed to bleed my brakes...
Anyway, I understand you start with the RR tire and then the LR and you should raise the rear end, so I plan on just backing up on my ramps and doing the rear. Question: when I move to the front tires should I put the front tires up on the ramps too? It would def make the job easier...
Second question: I saw a few people talking about needing to bleed the ABS system as well. I've never heard of that before, is that something that really needs to be done?
I was planning on getting one of those cheap $10 "one man brake bleed" kits you can get from Autozone so I don't have to have my gf out there pumping the pedal for me, anyone use one of those? Thanks in advance!
The brake master cylinder forces fluid into and through the lines into the caliper and out the bleed valve. To have the brake caliper elevated while it appears it would help doesn't make any difference.

What I was advised to do was to remove some of the old brake fluid from the reservoir then add new fluid. This speeds up the process, gets the old fluid out in less time.

If you use the technique where you or a helper pumps the pedal avoid bleeding so much fluid out that the brake pedal goes to the floor. Under normal operation of course the pedal never goes that low. If it does during the bleed process the piston enters an area of the cylinder it has never been in before and this area can have debris or even corrosion. The risk is this can damage the piston and its seal and thus you end up with a bad master cylinder after the bleed operation.

I've done the brakes using the pump the pedal method and more recently I've used a power bleeder. The techs I've watched all use a power bleeder and can bleed the brakes in no time. The power bleeder works pretty good. Be sure you do not use too much pressure.

Initially I used the power bleeder by filing its reservoir with fluid. This is a problem in that one has to ensure all the air is out the line that leads from the power bleeder reservoir to the master cylinder reservoir. Then after one has to thoroughly clean the power bleeder.

But I was told that I could just leave the power bleeder reservoir empty and just use the power bleeder to air pressurize the brake master cylinder reservoir. As long as one is careful to avoid running the fluid too low this is supposedly ok. To top up fluid the power bleeder has to be bled down and then removed to add fluid then connected back and pressurized again. But it one starts with as much fresh fluid in the brake reservoir as he can manage the power bleeder will only need to be disconnected to top up the fluid just a time or two.

As for the ABS system: For regular bleeds to just remove "old" fluid I never messed with the ABS. I do not recall the times I watched the techs bleed brakes if they used a diagnostic computer to cause the ABS pump to cycle and circulate fresh fluid through it.

In your case since you suspect air might be in the brake hydraulic system to be thorough you probably need to somehow operate the ABS pump and flush any air that might be in the system out.
 

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The brake master cylinder forces fluid into and through the lines into the caliper and out the bleed valve. To have the brake caliper elevated while it appears it would help doesn't make any difference.

What I was advised to do was to remove some of the old brake fluid from the reservoir then add new fluid. This speeds up the process, gets the old fluid out in less time.

If you use the technique where you or a helper pumps the pedal avoid bleeding so much fluid out that the brake pedal goes to the floor. Under normal operation of course the pedal never goes that low. If it does during the bleed process the piston enters an area of the cylinder it has never been in before and this area can have debris or even corrosion. The risk is this can damage the piston and its seal and thus you end up with a bad master cylinder after the bleed operation.

I've done the brakes using the pump the pedal method and more recently I've used a power bleeder. The techs I've watched all use a power bleeder and can bleed the brakes in no time. The power bleeder works pretty good. Be sure you do not use too much pressure.

Initially I used the power bleeder by filing its reservoir with fluid. This is a problem in that one has to ensure all the air is out the line that leads from the power bleeder reservoir to the master cylinder reservoir. Then after one has to thoroughly clean the power bleeder.

But I was told that I could just leave the power bleeder reservoir empty and just use the power bleeder to air pressurize the brake master cylinder reservoir. As long as one is careful to avoid running the fluid too low this is supposedly ok. To top up fluid the power bleeder has to be bled down and then removed to add fluid then connected back and pressurized again. But it one starts with as much fresh fluid in the brake reservoir as he can manage the power bleeder will only need to be disconnected to top up the fluid just a time or two.

As for the ABS system: For regular bleeds to just remove "old" fluid I never messed with the ABS. I do not recall the times I watched the techs bleed brakes if they used a diagnostic computer to cause the ABS pump to cycle and circulate fresh fluid through it.

In your case since you suspect air might be in the brake hydraulic system to be thorough you probably need to somehow operate the ABS pump and flush any air that might be in the system out.
Or you could tell the OP to look up the procedure using the online chilton's manual sticky.
 

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Or you could tell the OP to look up the procedure using the online chilton's manual sticky.
Think I have a link saved to that just I forget.
 

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Think I have a link saved to that just I forget.
I have it bookmarked but you can find the sticky here at the top of the list:
 
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