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Can anyone help me out with a step-by-step procedure on changing my front brake pads???:SM030:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Naw, this my first time getting hands on with brakes.
 

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I'm thinking you just might want to pay the extra $80 to have the dealer install the brakes. ;)
 

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Brakes are pretty straightforward but two things come to mind. Theres nothing to it if you know how to do it, and experience is what you get immediately after you need it.
 

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Changing the pads is easy, I haven't done a Challenger yet but I was a service tech at Goodyear for awhile, you usually just have to remove 2 long screws and then pry off the calipers, you will probably need the rotors turned also if you want to have "good" results, although the new pads will eventually seat to unturned rotors after a bit if they aren't too bad.
 

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Can anyone help me out with a step-by-step procedure on changing my front brake pads???:SM030:
I haven't done the challenger yet, but I have seen what it looks like down there. Here's a basic list:

1. Open brake fluid reservoir and set a rag loosely on top of it.
You want to allow the pressure to vent out when you compress the calipers later.
2. Loosen lug nuts on 1 axle
3. Jack car up 1 axle at a time.
4. Put in jack stands for stability
5. Remove first wheel
You should be looking at the rotor and caliper now.
Get a bungie or rope ready to tie off the caliper.
6. Remove 2 bolts from the caliper bracket (from rear). They'll be in a similar position as this:

7. Slide caliper off the old pads and tie off. DON'T let the caliper hang by the hose. You can destroy your brake line by letting it hang.
8. Slide off old pads.
9. Compress the caliper piston(s) all the way down. I'd guess the fronts have 2 pistons, but I don't know for sure. For this step I usually just use a vice and a 2x4 on most cars. Be careful about the piston's boot. Don't pinch it if you can avoid it. The caliper is still tied off for this step in case something slips on you.
10. Slide new pads into bracket. There's a forward and a backward sometimes. Just match the old pads.
11. Slide caliper on new pads.
12. Screw 2 bolts back in from the back of the caliper.

13. Do the rest 1 axle at a time. Mind your jack stands at all times (no young kids in the garage)
14. When you're all done and have all the wheels on the ground and all lug nuts tightened to spec start the car and mash the brake pedal until they start to grab.
15. Cap the brake reservoir.
EDIT: 15.5. Put a wrench on every lug nut again just in case you missed one, or an entire wheel. I've made that mistake before and thought I'd completely botch a suspension rebuild. Turns out a front wheel just wasn't torqued down! Luckily it was my cousin's beater and he didn't even understand what the sound was.
16. Take it around the block doing legit "brake checks" at stop signs and at corners. Be responsible. Don't get rear ended. This is to set the new pads to the rotors. You want to mash on the brakes a bit, so seatbelt.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Great info, thanks a lot!
 

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No problem. As with all things near the ground, some stuff tends to get stuck and hard to budge. The calipers might be a little stuck in place, so I usually jam a flathead or pry bar underneath them and jiggle until it loosens. This is where the jackstands become essential. If it's particularly difficult I break out the PB Blaster (spray can of lube you can find at any auto retailer). Just spray it on and wait 10 minutes. Everything should come loose nice and easy after that. Suspension bolts can sometimes take a sledge or a heat from a blowtorch, but I've never had to use either for a brake job.
 

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I haven't done the challenger yet, but I have seen what it looks like down there. Here's a basic list:

1. Open brake fluid reservoir and set a rag loosely on top of it.
You want to allow the pressure to vent out when you compress the calipers later.
2. Loosen lug nuts on 1 axle
3. Jack car up 1 axle at a time.
4. Put in jack stands for stability
5. Remove first wheel
You should be looking at the rotor and caliper now.
Get a bungie or rope ready to tie off the caliper.
6. Remove 2 bolts from the caliper bracket (from rear). They'll be in a similar position as this:

7. Slide caliper off the old pads and tie off. DON'T let the caliper hang by the hose. You can destroy your brake line by letting it hang.
8. Slide off old pads.
9. Compress the caliper piston(s) all the way down. I'd guess the fronts have 2 pistons, but I don't know for sure. For this step I usually just use a vice and a 2x4 on most cars. Be careful about the piston's boot. Don't pinch it if you can avoid it. The caliper is still tied off for this step in case something slips on you.
9.1 Clean caliper and rotor with brake cleaner.
9.2 Inspect rotor for wear and proper thickness, replace if needed.
10. Slide new pads into bracket. There's a forward and a backward sometimes. Just match the old pads.
11. Slide caliper on new pads.
12. Screw 2 bolts back in from the back of the caliper.

13. Do the rest 1 axle at a time. Mind your jack stands at all times (no young kids in the garage)
14. When you're all done and have all the wheels on the ground and all lug nuts tightened to spec start the car and mash the brake pedal until they start to grab.
15. Cap the brake reservoir.
EDIT: 15.5. Put a wrench on every lug nut again just in case you missed one, or an entire wheel. I've made that mistake before and thought I'd completely botch a suspension rebuild. Turns out a front wheel just wasn't torqued down! Luckily it was my cousin's beater and he didn't even understand what the sound was.
16. Take it around the block doing legit "brake checks" at stop signs and at corners. Be responsible. Don't get rear ended. This is to set the new pads to the rotors. You want to mash on the brakes a bit, so seatbelt.
I added some step's...9.1 and 9.2
 
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