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During a brake job on all 4's, what would be reasonable additional cost to have the system flushed with new fluid?

Milage is at 35K, but 8 years old.
 

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Prices differ depending on where you live, I just call a few places to get estimates.
 

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During a brake job on all 4's, what would be reasonable additional cost to have the system flushed with new fluid?

Milage is at 35K, but 8 years old.
Its run ~ $130 - $140 when I've had this done at the dealer
 

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During a brake job on all 4's, what would be reasonable additional cost to have the system flushed with new fluid?

Milage is at 35K, but 8 years old.
What other fluid besides new fluid would be used? That's a brake fluid flush definition, really. New fluid is pumped through the system pushing the old fluid out.

What you need to do is consider having this done more often than every 8 years. Generally a car maker specifies a brake fluid flush based on miles or time. For instance Porsche called for brake fluid (and for cars fitted with a manual transmission because the clutch hydraulic system shares fluid with the brake hydraulic system) and clutch fluid flush bleed every 2 years. I know from experience letting this go just 2.5 years affected the hydraulic clutch system operation.

I checked the digital copy of the owners manual I have for my Hellcat and have to report -- to my surprise -- there appears to be no flush/bleed on the Dodge maintenance schedule. Wow.

Brake fluid is very hygroscopic -- absorbs moisture from the air and being the brake fluid reservoir is vented to atmosphere and "breathes" air in and out as the temperature of the fluid goes up and down -- I'm surprised Dodge doesn't have a brake fluid flush/bleed recommendation.

Unless when I talk to the dealer service department about this and it can make a good case this is not necessary -- maybe the brake fluid used is *not* hygroscopic or the fluid is not exposed to any atmospheric air I'm going to have this done every 2 years.
 

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It probably wouldn't help the potential moisture problem but I occasionally suck out the majority of the brake fluid in the reservoir and replace it with fresh fluid. The older stuff tends to get darker with age for some reason.
I read somewhere that most Chevrolet vehicles can go 150,000 miles or 10 years without a brake fluid change.
Since my owners manual doesn't address it, and the highest miles on any of my cars is about 40,000, I don't worry much about it.
 

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It probably wouldn't help the potential moisture problem but I occasionally suck out the majority of the brake fluid in the reservoir and replace it with fresh fluid. The older stuff tends to get darker with age for some reason.
I read somewhere that most Chevrolet vehicles can go 150,000 miles or 10 years without a brake fluid change.
Since my owners manual doesn't address it, and the highest miles on any of my cars is about 40,000, I don't worry much about it.
Don't recall if there was a brake fluid flush/bleed schedule for my Pontiac GTO. But with my Porsche Boxster and Porsche Turbo it was every 2 years. My experience with my Boxster is when I let this go the 2.5 year old fluid affected the clutch action and this affected shifting. (The clutch hydraulic system shares fluid with the brake hydraulic system.) While the clutch action was affected braking action was not affected. But I wonder how durable the brake master cylinder, brake pistons, seals, lines would have been leaving that fluid in the system.

I wonder how Chevy vehicles can go 150K miles or 10 years with no brake fluid service? Must be a sealed (?) system or perhaps fluid that is not hygroscopic and thus doesn't need to be changed.

Next time I'm at the dealer I will see if I can learn what's up with the lack of a brake fluid flush/bleed not being on the maintenance schedule. I don't have a problem -- I guess -- if Dodge doesn't believe the fluid needs to be changed. That is if Dodge has come up with a brake fluid system setup that doesn't require periodic fluid replacement I don't have a problem not changing the fluid.

Might mention that other fluids can go a long time without having to be replaced. My 2002 Boxster went 16 years and 317K miles on its original power steering fluid. The power steering system was otherwise original and noise free and remained leak free all those years and miles. (The Turbo I think got new power steering fluid when I had to have the power steering tank changed to address a noisy high pressure relief valve. But there was no maintenance required of the Turbo power steering fluid system.)

In hindsight -- though apparently based on my experience unnecessary -- I could have removed some power steering fluid every so often and replaced it with fresh fluid to over time keep the fluid fresher than it would have been without me doing this.

Of course I note you do this with your car's brake fluid and that is I think is smart -- a bit over and above what is called for but I have no problem giving my car better servicing than called for by Dodge -- and I'll probably follow suite unless I get some word from the Dodge service department, techs, this is unnecessary.
 

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At my shop we charge $79. ($99 - $20 coupon) we Usally recommend 3 yr 36K. Unless the car had a problem with a caliper locking up or a bad hose. If brake fluid boils it is garbage. Most Euro cars it is part of a 35-40K service and I have seen a lot of failures on the brake pumps when not preformed. Very expensive to replace and program. Brake fluid attracts moisture and that will lower the boiling point. When you see these steel lines all rotted it’s usally from the inside out. Easy to do in your garage. A quart of fluid, Turkey baster , drip pan ,a little hose and a couple of wrenches. Pull the fluid out with baster fill up and open the furthest bleeder from the master. Once the fluid comes out clear close and go to the next. No reason to touch the pedal. Use the hose to attach to bleeder.( fluid will damage painted calipers) and keep topping off the MasterCylender. Cheap and easy.
 

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At my shop we charge $79. ($99 - $20 coupon) we Usally recommend 3 yr 36K. Unless the car had a problem with a caliper locking up or a bad hose. If brake fluid boils it is garbage. Most Euro cars it is part of a 35-40K service and I have seen a lot of failures on the brake pumps when not preformed. Very expensive to replace and program. Brake fluid attracts moisture and that will lower the boiling point. When you see these steel lines all rotted it’s usally from the inside out. Easy to do in your garage. A quart of fluid, Turkey baster , drip pan ,a little hose and a couple of wrenches. Pull the fluid out with baster fill up and open the furthest bleeder from the master. Once the fluid comes out clear close and go to the next. No reason to touch the pedal. Use the hose to attach to bleeder.( fluid will damage painted calipers) and keep topping off the MasterCylender. Cheap and easy.
This^^.......doesn’t matter what the car manufacturer recommends, brake fluid is hygroscopic and should be changed on a regular schedule. I do mine every 2 years. One trick to make it easier is to alternate different color brake fluid at every change, ie use ATE Super Blue (its blue colored duh) then 2 years later switch to clear and vice versa in another 2 years. With the color change, it’s obvious when the old fluid is sucked out of the brake lines and replaced with new.
 

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At my shop we charge $79. ($99 - $20 coupon) we Usually recommend 3 yr 36K. Unless the car had a problem with a caliper locking up or a bad hose. If brake fluid boils it is garbage. Most Euro cars it is part of a 35-40K service and I have seen a lot of failures on the brake pumps when not preformed. Very expensive to replace and program. Brake fluid attracts moisture and that will lower the boiling point. When you see these steel lines all rotted it’s usually from the inside out. Easy to do in your garage. A quart of fluid, Turkey baster , drip pan ,a little hose and a couple of wrenches. Pull the fluid out with baster fill up and open the furthest bleeder from the master. Once the fluid comes out clear close and go to the next. No reason to touch the pedal. Use the hose to attach to bleeder.( fluid will damage painted calipers) and keep topping off the Master Cylinder. Cheap and easy.
Mike hits the major points on replacing brake fluid.

The only thing is with ABS systems - you have a redundant circuit of lines to / from the ABS pump that typically require cycling the ABS pump to get that old brake fluid circulated out.

The claim of brake fluid for 10 yrs / 150k - I'd be very sceptical about that. You can assure yourself that there would be corrosion throughout the brake system components.
During a brake service (which would likely take place well before 10 years) most shops would probably look at changing the fluid as it would be black in color (and high % of water in the fluid/ very low boiling point then).

Customers that tried that long interval will be greatly dismayed at the cost of replacing ABS pump, brake lines, master cylinder and brake calipers to the tune of a 4 digit repair bill.
 

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Mike hits the major points on replacing brake fluid.

The only thing is with ABS systems - you have a redundant circuit of lines to / from the ABS pump that typically require cycling the ABS pump to get that old brake fluid circulated out.

The claim of brake fluid for 10 yrs / 150k - I'd be very sceptical about that. You can assure yourself that there would be corrosion throughout the brake system components.
During a brake service (which would likely take place well before 10 years) most shops would probably look at changing the fluid as it would be black in color (and high % of water in the fluid/ very low boiling point then).

Customers that tried that long interval will be greatly dismayed at the cost of replacing ABS pump, brake lines, master cylinder and brake calipers to the tune of a 4 digit repair bill.
How does the home mechanic cycle fluid through the ABS system?
 

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How does the home mechanic cycle fluid through the ABS system?
Probably if you had the more advanced scan tools that allow access to ABS & body control modules that can make the ABS run through its diagnostics.

That's one of the reasons why I have this done at the shop. Plus dealing with brake fluid is messy stuff.
 

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"we ... recommend 3 yr 36K."

This makes more sense than letting the fluid go apparently forever based on the fact that apparently Dodge has no brake fluid flush/bleed or replacement requirement.

Geesh. What is Dodge thinking? Can Dodge be that driven to appear to require less servicing than other brands in some lame attempt to set itself apart at the cost of not requiring periodic brake fluid flush bleeds and what this lack of basic maintenance might mean for its customers over the years?

Ok. I'll just revert to the same brake fluid flush/bleed schedule I used with my previous cars, and have this done every 2 years. As I touched upon in an earlier post I know old brake fluid which is shared with the clutch hydraulic system can affect the hydraulic clutch's behavior and while I noticed no braking issues the bad fluid can't be healthy for the brake hydraulic system components.

Might add having the brake and clutch fluid flushed/bled every 2 years (well, one time after 2.5 years) even after 16 years and 317K miles and a number of new rotor and brake pad sets the basic brake hydraulic (and clutch) system was (were) still factory original and working just fine. And over the years with other cars while I have worn out uncountable sets of rotors and pads/brake shoes even, I have never had a brake master cylinder or any brake line or brake line fitting leak, or a brake caliper piston leak. When I had a vehicle with brake drums I'd always replace the wheel cylinder along with all the other hardware in the drum.
 

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GM says fluid changes are unnecessary.


Chrysler says no recommended service interval for brake fluid because today's brake systems are much tighter and don't allow as much moisture penetration. Contamination is a non-issue.


Ford does not recommend brake fluid change intervals here in the U.S.
Ford's service life for brake fluid is 10 years, 150,000 miles (has been this for past four or five years).
Ford says if there is a reliable way to test fluid and the fluid tests bad, then it should be changed. Otherwise, leave it alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Probably $150 to $200 at the dealership.
Yeah, that's what I'm trying to avoid. But they do have the tools to cycle the ABS to push the new fluid through them. The plan was to R&R the pads and put on new rotors front and back myself, and then finding a place to flush the system out. I was curious how much I should expect to pay. 100 bucks... I can live with that.

Thanks for all the replies, very informative conversation.
 

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I've seen a lot of Ford / GM / Chrysler vehicles of recent years at shows, cars & coffee events and the brake fluid in the reservoirs are dark brown or black looking fluid - when the fluid was new, it was practically clear, slight tint (like white wine, not even light amber).

And presence of moisture in the fluid makes it turn dark.
 

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I've seen a lot of Ford / GM / Chrysler vehicles of recent years at shows, cars & coffee events and the brake fluid in the reservoirs are dark brown or black looking fluid - when the fluid was new, it was practically clear, slight tint (like white wine, not even light amber).

And presence of moisture in the fluid makes it turn dark.
Interesting. Those excerpts I posted above mentioned... "Fluid discoloration can be caused by assembly oils and breakdown of seal compounds -- but does not affect fluid performance."


Check out ...FASCAR drip strip method of checking brake fluid


Here's an interesting article https://www.brakebleeder.com/solutions/brake-fluid-testing/resources/new-test-stops-age-old-myth/
 

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How does the home mechanic cycle fluid through the ABS system?
I've seen it reported that if you don't have the proper scan tool, one can flush the system as normal. Then find yourself a low traction area such as a dirt road or large grass patch, hit that at speed, and engage the ABS, it will cycle the new fluid in and push the old out.
Then re-bleed the system until the fluid is clean.

I took mine to the shop.

As to the cost, some of that depends on the brake fluid too, I upgraded from DOT3 to DOT4 when I flushed mine, but it was still under $100.
 
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