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Discussion Starter #1
I wasn't sure where to put this question but i thought general discussion would be okay so here it is:
Has anyone bought any kind of car off a dealer lot in another country and brought the car back to your home country?

I live in canada and right across from detroit michigan. Buying a new challenger in canada isn't a problem but it is way more expensive then in america. An r/t classic costs $48 000 appx before taxes and here in ontario the tax is 13% putting the price of a brand new r/t classic somewhere in the range of $55 000. An r/t classic in america is around $35 000 and only 6% sales tax in michigan more then half the tax in canada. Making an r/t classic around $37 000 in america. Thats a savings of around $18 000.

I know id have to factor in exchange rate and possibly duty. but has anyone ever done this? if i can buy a challenger in michigan and save a lot of money id be willing to do so. Any help is greatly appreciated!
 

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second because you bought a vehicle in the USA, doesnt mean you will not be paying significant duties and taxes coming across the border
Luke
 

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third, oops no warranty, warranty between countries do not transfer, hence buy in the USA, no warranty in Canada or vice versa
Luke
 

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last but not least, your vehicle may not meet your countries requirement therefore cannot be registered until modified to meet the requirements, this is a big deal, for example in the USA, 49 state vehicles cannot be sold new in NY or CA
Luke
 

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No reason why you can't put I bet you are going to pay a heavy penalty/tax to get the car registered in Canada that will eliminate any savings. If there were not many people would already doing this.
 

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No reason why you can't put I bet you are going to pay a heavy penalty/tax to get the car registered in Canada that will eliminate any savings. If there were not many people would already doing this.

USA dealers cannot sell as per franchise agreement new vehicles for export, very strict rules, taxes must be paid in the selling county and state and must be registered for a minimum of 6 months before they can be resold. the fines are so substantial that very few dealers will ever test Chrysler's resolve on this, also ground for franchise termination

Luke
 

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A former manager used to buy used cars in the US, then drive them over the border into Canada for his daughters. He'd pick a reasonable priced vehicle on E-bay and then get his paperwork in order and drive it himself into Canada.

It was cheaper to pay any import tax at the border on a cheaper US vehicle, than to buy the same car in Canada.

Zero problems getting the cars registered up in Canada once he got them over the border. Needed a fair bit of formal paperwork at the border to verify the vehicle value, etc. Was a little intimidating at first, but then once he got the hang of it he found it straightforward.

He must have taken at least 4 or 5 cars into Canada over the years.

These were all used vehicles just outside any manufacturers warranty, so he didn't care about keeping the manufacturers happy and complying with their "rules".
 

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Hi,
I've had two challengers from new imported to England, I used a import agent here in the UK who handled everything, but as Luke quite rightly pointed out by the time you've paid taxes and had mods done to make it road legal for your country you save no money, I had to import as the Challnger is not sold anywhere in Europe.
All the best
 

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`What I know

-Cannot buy new from USA.
-No duty on anything that is built in North America....so Challenger-no duty.
-No warranty from Dodge Canada...at all.
-Some states will charge you tax unless you trailer it back to Canada.
-You will still pay normal tax on a USA car...to your province, when brought over.
-I bought 2009 Corvette in the USA and drove it back to Ontario...no duty or USA tax, Canadian warranty for GM cars is valid after 12,000km and 6 months old.

Yes, they are cheaper....if you find a good enough deal on used , it may be worth it. I was thinking of a Challenger in the states also, but found a great deal here. My 2012 srt (all option) was 2 months old and had 2,000 km on it...payed 46,000. at that time. So going to the USA was not worth it for me to save, say....5,000. and no warranty on top. of that.
 

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sometime its worth it, but need to remember, few poeple can pay outright, financial institutions have a hard time financing something in a different country
yes, if done right you can save a bunch of money, but do you really want a gray market vehicle with no warranty, if its a high dollar vehicle??
Luke
 

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I was hoping to buy a new Challenger for export (to New Zealand), looks like I will have to do my homework here! May have to buy a near new one instead. :disappointed:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks for all the info guys, i really wasn't sure if it was possible so i found out, can't blame a man for trying to save some of his hard earned dollars
 

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Join the Canadian armed forces get posted in the states and buy your RT that way. Those guys do it all the time or at least they used to.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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I have imported a car from the USA into Canada in 2005 and the point of entry was at the Detroit /Windsor border crossing.It can be done but spend some time doing your homework and understanding the procedure.The car was a Buick Le Sabre and after all was said & done I saved $ 4,386.

Not sure if some of the rules have changed but here are some links to check out and get you started should you decide to pursue the possibility of buying in the USA.

Importing vehicles purchased in the United States - Transport Canada

Section 3.0 - Passenger Cars

Vehicle Import Compatibility (Admissibility) list for vehicles purchased in the United States

Frequently Asked Questions - Importing vehicles purchased in the United States into Canada - Transport Canada

http://www.tc.gc.ca/motorvehiclesafety/safevehicles/importation/usa/vafus/list2/Section3_0.htm

http://www.tc.gc.ca/motorvehiclesaf...HRYSLER___PLYMOUTH___DODGE___EAGLE___JEEP.htm

Registrar of Imported Vehicles - Importing a Vehicle

Registrar of Imported Vehicles - Important Notices

Registrar of Imported Vehicles - Before You Import
 

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I used to be a Manager at a Chrysler dealer and we had a guy come in one time to buy a car while trading in his current car. As soon as we found out his trade was from the US we would not even consider taking in his vehicle. Another point to consider when importing a car....future resale value is horrible! What you might save when buying you will most likely lose when selling!
 

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I used to be a Manager at a Chrysler dealer and we had a guy come in one time to buy a car while trading in his current car. As soon as we found out his trade was from the US we would not even consider taking in his vehicle. Another point to consider when importing a car....future resale value is horrible! What you might save when buying you will most likely lose when selling!
Not so in my case, but I'm sure this could apply to some.

My 09 Corvette vert...I bought it in USA, it was 8 months old. Drove for almost 3 years (no winters) and sold it for $200 less then I payed for it.......nice! lucky to I guess.

Just before I sold it private, I was ready to trade it in for a new Challenger SRT....was close to making a deal with a Chrysler dealer...we were only about 5 grand apart....that gap was to big for me...but I could have had a deal with them....again just my experience.

I'm now looking for a 2013 Lincoln MKS.... cheaper down south....dollar sucks right now thou.

Found a dealer in my area (Ontario) selling to of them used 2013...from USA....YOU WILL FIND a number of dealers with USA cars on there lot...even GM,FORD dealer have some from time to time...not just a small dealer.
 

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I firmly believe that a Canadian should be able to purchase a vehicle in the USA that is not available in Canada. Perfect example is the "core" model of the SRT. Absolutely no reason the core model couldn't be imported and registered in Canada, as a new vehicle. Only the rules and conditions of Dodge imposes on their US dealerships prevented this.

Not only do I think this is wrong of Dodge to prevent this, I would also think that it could possibly be illegal to impose restrictions of the sale of new "not available in Canada" models of Dodge.

Just my thoughts and 2 cents on this topic.
 

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I am HORRIFIED at vehicle prices in Canada; and the whole car buying process is 10X more difficult.

I have bough dozens of cars in my life. In the last year alone, I helped my parents in Vancouver, Canada, to buy a Dodge Journey RT, and I bought a new Challenger and new Jeep Wrangler for myself here in the US.

Not only are MSRPs 20% higher in Canada, but specific information that is publicly disclosed in the US, like Chrysler's Friends and Family pricing or specific promotions are not made available until the moment you sit down to "haggle" (the same can be said when you shop in Canada for mortgage rates or other loans).

Personally, part of the reason I have bought so many cars living here in the US is because of the transparency of the process. Yes, we love to complain how "difficult" buying a car can be, but the fact is all the information we need is at our fingertips if we chose to look for it. By contrast, no matter how hard I tried, Chrysler Canada and the dealer remained polite but vague and tight-lipped until we walked into the showroom.

This huge disparity in prices north and south of the border exists because OEMs allow Canadian dealers to protect themselves despite existing US-Canada free trade agreements. Yes, NAFTA allows the duty-free flow of vehicles across the border; but by refusing to honor warranties and such, Canada dealers are, in fact, erecting barriers to protect themselves from US dealers.

Case in point: my dad's 2013 Dodge Journey had an MSRP of $38,500; the exact same vehicle here in So Cal had a sticker price just under $30,000. Another example, I paid $99 for an oil change and tire rotation for my Jeep Wrangler Rubicon at a Vancouver Jeep dealer; I pay $20 for the exact same service here in So Cal.

Yes, I've heard the arguments: "oh, the smaller population of Canada does not allow the economies of scale needed to compete against US dealers", "Canada's vast, sparsely populated geography makes distribution more expensive", "Canada's more advanced social welfare needs to be protected".

There are many causes for these price disparities. But I believe the key underlying reason is Canada businesses have a strong hold of the legislative system. For instance, at a time British Columbia had the tradition of electing car salesmen as Premier (akin to State Governor here); currently, one of the richest men and biggest philanthropists in BC is a car dealer. This economic and political clout gives Canada dealers the power to perpetuate business practices that are disappearing in the US.

Did my parents in Canada get a decent deal on their Dodge Journey? In the end, yes they did. Would I want to go through it all over again? Not in a million years; meanwhile, like I said, I bought two new vehicles for myself MUCH more easily down here.
 

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I am HORRIFIED at vehicle prices in Canada; and the whole car buying process is 10X more difficult.

I have bough dozens of cars in my life. In the last year alone, I helped my parents in Vancouver, Canada, to buy a Dodge Journey RT, and I bought a new Challenger and new Jeep Wrangler for myself here in the US.

Not only are MSRPs 20% higher in Canada, but specific information that is publicly disclosed in the US, like Chrysler's Friends and Family pricing or specific promotions are not made available until the moment you sit down to "haggle" (the same can be said when you shop in Canada for mortgage rates or other loans).

Personally, part of the reason I have bought so many cars living here in the US is because of the transparency of the process. Yes, we love to complain how "difficult" buying a car can be, but the fact is all the information we need is at our fingertips if we chose to look for it. By contrast, no matter how hard I tried, Chrysler Canada and the dealer remained polite but vague and tight-lipped until we walked into the showroom.

This huge disparity in prices north and south of the border exists because OEMs allow Canadian dealers to protect themselves despite existing US-Canada free trade agreements. Yes, NAFTA allows the duty-free flow of vehicles across the border; but by refusing to honor warranties and such, Canada dealers are, in fact, erecting barriers to protect themselves from US dealers.

Case in point: my dad's 2013 Dodge Journey had an MSRP of $38,500; the exact same vehicle here in So Cal had a sticker price just under $30,000. Another example, I paid $99 for an oil change and tire rotation for my Jeep Wrangler Rubicon at a Vancouver Jeep dealer; I pay $20 for the exact same service here in So Cal.

Yes, I've heard the arguments: "oh, the smaller population of Canada does not allow the economies of scale needed to compete against US dealers", "Canada's vast, sparsely populated geography makes distribution more expensive", "Canada's more advanced social welfare needs to be protected".

There are many causes for these price disparities. But I believe the key underlying reason is Canada businesses have a strong hold of the legislative system. For instance, at a time British Columbia had the tradition of electing car salesmen as Premier (akin to State Governor here); currently, one of the richest men and biggest philanthropists in BC is a car dealer. This economic and political clout gives Canada dealers the power to perpetuate business practices that are disappearing in the US.

Did my parents in Canada get a decent deal on their Dodge Journey? In the end, yes they did. Would I want to go through it all over again? Not in a million years; meanwhile, like I said, I bought two new vehicles for myself MUCH more easily down here.
Well said.We here in Canada are getting the shaft when it comes to buying our vehicles in Canada when compared to the same model in the USA.I live about an hour from the plant where Dodge manufactures the Challenger,Charger & 300M but yet we pay $8,000+ more for the car and the freight is just as much as a car shipped to the west coast of Canada,...go figure,:soapbox:

I guess the manufacturer can offset the costs of offering cheaper prices to the American public by charging the Canadian consumer a substantial amount more.After all,...they are an American based company,...huh,...the story of Canada!
 
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