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I have a 2018 SXT. As i look at various mods/upgrades, I've noticed information about brake calipers. To be specific, it mentions single piston, dual piston, etc. My question is, how do I know if I have single or dual piston calipers? Does the SXT come with one particular type standard?

Thanks.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Unless it has the upgraded brake package, it will have single piston calipers in the front. If it has an upgraded suspension and/or rear-end, it probably has the upgraded brakes which are dual piston calipers (in front).
 

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You bought it new?

It's very simple, if the car was delivered with 18 inch wheels it has the BR3 single piston brakes. If it had 20 inch wheels it will have the BR5 dual piston brakes.

If you did not buy it new, look on the tire and loading information sticker in the driver's door jamb and it will tell you the original tire and wheel size.



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2016 SXT Plus Blacktop
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This will be the front caliper, the rear is single piston. You can actually look through the wheel and see which you have


A Guy
 

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I have a 2018 SXT. As i look at various mods/upgrades, I've noticed information about brake calipers. To be specific, it mentions single piston, dual piston, etc. My question is, how do I know if I have single or dual piston calipers? Does the SXT come with one particular type standard?

Thanks.
I'm wondering why you would want to upgrade the brakes on a V6. I'm on my 3rd V6 Challenger, but this is the first of them that came with 20" wheels from the factory, so it has the dual piston front brake calipers. They serve me well, but are you looking to take your car to the track, or do autocross with it?
 

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Single piston and dual-piston calipers both have the same stopping effect. the single piston is usually twice as large as the dual, they both have the same surface area pushing against the brake pad. Anything above a single-piston the caliper bore usually going to be smaller but the surface area is the same.
 

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While the total piston diameter may be the same, the clamping force is better distributed and the pad design can be changed to take advantage. In the case of the Challenger at least, I believe the dual piston piston's total diameter is greater than the single piston

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And of course the multi piston Brembo calipers have opposing pistons and clamp from both sides

A Guy
 

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‘74 Duster 360 4M
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And of course the multi piston Brembo calipers have opposing pistons and clamp from both sides

A Guy
The floating caliper clamps from both sides, too. But instead of pushing a piston and pad on both sides of the rotor, it instead pulls the pad on one side while pushing from the other.

This might be what you meant, but someone might confuse your statement as saying that a fixed caliper has more braking force because it pushes from both sides of the rotor while a floating caliper has only about half the same force because it only has pistons on one side. This is not true.

The performance advantage of a fixed caliper is in the fact that the braking is more consistent due to the pads generally being in the same place after each application. A floating caliper moves around more and might require more pedal travel at times to apply the brakes because the rotors have pushed the pads and caliper back a varying amount due to some difference in the road/track.

And a fixed caliper doesn’t guarantee stronger brakes just because they are fixed. The piston size and rotor size is still the determining factors. As an example, the later BR9 police brake package should be stronger than the 4 piston Brembo brakes due to it’s slightly larger rotors and bigger piston area. This ignores the pad coefficient of friction because that is a fairly easy variable to change.
 

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Yes, of course I meant that the Bembos have pistons on both sides ;)

A Guy
 
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I believe the single piston type cover as much total area as a dual. due to the different design of the brake pad
 

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I believe the single piston type cover as much total area as a dual. due to the different design of the brake pad
The BR3 single piston brake pad is a touch taller than the BR5/6 dual piston brake pad but a good bit short in length. The BR3 pad is about 2.2” x 5.92” while the BR5/6 pad is about 2.17” x 7.22”. But the size of the pad doesn’t really affect the brake torque much, more just how long the pad wears.

What does influence brake torque is the area of the caliper piston(s). The BR3 caliper piston has 4.374 sq. inches of area while the BR5/6 caliper pistons total 4.277 sq. inches. So the single piston caliper does indeed have more piston area and thus should generate more pressure on the brake pads.

But when you pair the higher force of the single piston caliper with a smaller rotor (12.6” vs. 13.6”), you end up with a system that is only capable of about 91% of the brake torque the dual piston calipers can supply.

This is assuming the same pad coefficient of friction. So, in theory, if you put a GG pad on the BR3 caliper, it might brake just as well as a BR5 with an EE pad. But put the same GG pad on the BR5 caliper and it will out brake the single piston caliper.
 
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I'll try this. If you have a 3.50" pad but the piston is at one end of the pad, not very good pad to rotor contact. Thats why the single piston caliper has a large piston centered on the brake pad, dual piston will ,be placed on the outer edges of the pad. So the configuration of the brake pad is important for different calipers.
 
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