Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi y'all. New Chally R/T owner. I have one question. I plan on doing the basic mods that every challenger needs, intake, 180 thermostat, oil catch, headers, exhaust, tuner. But I also want to do a cam swap. Either from an srt or the highly recommended comp cam. I want this car to be a beast. But would also like to own it till I turn grey. So I want to make sure the engine is running correctly. Does anyone know if a cam swap will require new balancing as far as engine vibration goes? Because the last thing I need is a busted cam when it hits 6,000 rpms. I want it to handle the vibration. Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
This is pretty basic engine tech- The cam has no part in the basic balance of the engine. Yes, it has to be selected to work with the state of tune, exhaust system, gear ratio, and torque convertor you have installed, but that's different than balance.

Things that affect engine balance are pistons, pins, crank, connecting rods- the so-called "rotating assembly". Any time any of those items are touched- such as forged pistons for turbo or supercharging- machine work is required to re-balance the engine. Any competent machine shop will do this by default, but then there are different degrees of balancing too. As with everything, you can be very very precise, or you can be a little sloppier. Thats what will vary.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Modern Muscle

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
This is pretty basic engine tech- The cam has no part in the basic balance of the engine. Yes, it has to be selected to work with the state of tune, exhaust system, gear ratio, and torque convertor you have installed, but that's different than balance.

Things that affect engine balance are pistons, pins, crank, connecting rods- the so-called "rotating assembly". Any time any of those items are touched- such as forged pistons for turbo or supercharging- machine work is required to re-balance the engine. Any competent machine shop will do this by default, but then there are different degrees of balancing too. As with everything, you can be very very precise, or you can be a little sloppier. Thats what will vary.
Thanks Magnum! I'm in an auto tech program at the moment and haven't gotten to that area yet so I was curious as to whether that would affect it at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
Thanks Magnum! I'm in an auto tech program at the moment and haven't gotten to that area yet so I was curious as to whether that would affect it at all.
Very cool! You'll learn things that will amaze you. When I was first getting into the car hobby, the cam was THE brain of the engine. Pretty much everything else you do to the car: exhaust, intake, carb, torque convertor, final drive ratio, tire size, etc. revolved around how the cam commands the way the air moves through the engine, what RPM the power peak will be at, what RPM the torque peak will be at, and so on. Today, the computer is the "other brain" of the engine, and even controls the cam to an extent in engines with variable valve timing. But the cam still is the master of how the air moves through the engine and when, and in turn that controls just about everything else. The main thing today is that the computer has to have software that can actually take advantage of the cam (or even just work right with it!). You can't make too much of a change to one without the other!

That said- the cam is small, neutral in balance, and only spins half as fast as the crankshaft. Just doesn't come into the balance equation at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Very cool! You'll learn things that will amaze you. When I was first getting into the car hobby, the cam was THE brain of the engine. Pretty much everything else you do to the car: exhaust, intake, carb, torque convertor, final drive ratio, tire size, etc. revolved around how the cam commands the way the air moves through the engine, what RPM the power peak will be at, what RPM the torque peak will be at, and so on. Today, the computer is the "other brain" of the engine, and even controls the cam to an extent in engines with variable valve timing. But the cam still is the master of how the air moves through the engine and when, and in turn that controls just about everything else. The main thing today is that the computer has to have software that can actually take advantage of the cam (or even just work right with it!). You can't make too much of a change to one without the other!

That said- the cam is small, neutral in balance, and only spins half as fast as the crankshaft. Just doesn't come into the balance equation at all.
No kidding! Just started timing.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top