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How difficult would it be to install the Eibach Camber Alignment kits, front and rear. Looking to lower with new springs, I hear the camber can get out of whack. Is this still the case with new springs and shocks.
 

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Brand name ?

When you say "New Springs & Shocks" what brand are you switching to ? KW, Mopar, Eibach or Pedders ? :read:
 

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How difficult would it be to install the Eibach Camber Alignment kits, front and rear. Looking to lower with new springs, I hear the camber can get out of whack. Is this still the case with new springs and shocks.
I have a '13 SRT8 Core that has Mopar Stage 1 springs installed. After installing the srpings, the camber was a bit too negative in the front (-2.2 Front Right, -1.6 Front left) and bit out in the rear. I purchased the SPC Front Adjustable Upper Control Arms (SPC Part 66045) and the SPC Rear Adjustable Camber Bushings (SPC Part 66050).

I have heard that SPC makes the front Upper Control Arms for Eibach, so I decided to purchase the SPC version since it was cheaper. I am not sure about the Eibach rear bushings - they look different than the SPC version. Something to keep in mind though - not sure what year your Challenger is - but Chrysler used two different bushing sizes in the rear and apparently it wasn't done by model year necessarily. There is a 39.5mm and 41.5mm bushing size. The SPC bushings are stepped and made to work in either case - 39.5 or 41.5mm. I don't believe the Eibach bushings are like this - I think you have to purchase separate parts.

I did the install myself and I can tell you the front Upper Control Arms are not that big a deal. The hardest part of the install in the front was getting to the bolts under the hood to remove the existing control arms. The passenger side required loosening the strut brace, removing/loosening the plastic panels around the windshield wipers and removing the computer module that is located behind the passenger strut tower. You do have to remove or at least loosen up the strut to get the bolts out of the control arms where they attach to the body. Once everything was out, putting the new SPC control arms in was easy. The SPC arms allow full adjustment of camber (sliding the ball joint in/out) and caster is set by clocking it with a small adjustable 'plate'. I had a camber/caster gauge that I used to ballpark the alignment until I got it to a real alignment shop. All in all, the front is very doable for someone with some tools and a modest level of wrench turning ability :)

NOW... the rear bushings... are a PITA!!! The bushings have to be turned and set just right to increase/decrease your camber. Since they are a 'one shot' bushing, this means you have to get them set perfectly and THEN press them into the control arms. And of course, there are 2 per side, and they must be set exactly the same on both of the control arms or you will bind up the bushings when the suspension travels. Doing this successfully ended up being too much of a pain for me considering my rear camber is just slightly out of spec. The real challenge (for me at least) was getting the bushing set where I needed it, and then keeping it there without it shifting while I pressed it in with the bushing press. I did get them set once, but could tell immediately that the camber wasn't where it needed to be so I had to try again. I finally decided to throw the white flag and surrender... I ended up putting the original bushings back in. I plan to find a good set of adjustable control arms for the rear at some point to get my camber dialed in exactly.

There are some other options for the rear besides the bushings (i.e., rear control arms). For my car, the only rear adjustable control arms I found were made by Razors Edge and cost around $700 - more than I wanted to spend for slightly out of spec camber in the rear. I think there are other options for the pre-2011 cars also.

Good luck to you if you go for it. It is a doable project, just make sure you have the right tools and some time to spare.
 
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