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I was walking down a row of Mopars at a car show, with my key fob in my pocket(2014 Chally). There was'nt much activity around these cars, just basically set and all lined up for the show. I'm almost certain that I heard chirping from several of the cars I was passing. This just didn't happen once, it happened several times. My key fob was in my pocket and maybe the walking movement, touched one of the buttons. What do you think, is this possible? thanks.
 

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Seems to me that each FOB would be assigned its own unique code but hey, stranger things have happened. B-
 

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I would think that the law of averages would say yes....however I would be very surprised if two vehicles using the same frequency were in the same state let alone the same parking lot.

However, as has been stated, anything is possible
 

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We were staying at a motel at the shore several years ago and every time I went to lock or unlock my wife's Chrysler Pacifica she had at the time, a Subaru Outback in the lot would go into the "panic" mode. There are probably only so many codes available until they are used again.
 
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I was walking down a row of Mopars at a car show, with my key fob in my pocket(2014 Chally). There was'nt much activity around these cars, just basically set and all lined up for the show. I'm almost certain that I heard chirping from several of the cars I was passing. This just didn't happen once, it happened several times. My key fob was in my pocket and maybe the walking movement, touched one of the buttons. What do you think, is this possible? thanks.
The ID code is a large number, 64 bits or even larger. 2^64 is a very large number. 2^128 is larger still. While the car makers at least some buy their RFID chips from the same manufacturer each RFID chip is burned (lasered) with unique ID number.

What can happen is since the keys all use the same transmit frequency one or more cars picks up the RF signal from a nearby key that may have had a button pressed by accident and decode the ID but of course finds it does not match any of the ones in the car's security system memory. The chirp might be the car's limited vocabulary to let you (or the owner) know some spurious signal was received but was not acted upon in any significant way.
 

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We were staying at a motel at the shore several years ago and every time I went to lock or unlock my wife's Chrysler Pacifica she had at the time, a Subaru Outback in the lot would go into the "panic" mode. There are probably only so many codes available until they are used again.
I have seen that happen personally with other people's remotes triggering a Subaru. I did it once, and a co-worker's Saturn Vue would trigger another Subaru in our garage.
 
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