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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2013 Challenger of course SXT 3.6 145804 miles has a P0430 Permanent Catalyst Efficiency Bank 2 code.
If you Clear the code 2 go away and the Permanent stays. I have replaced the Catalytic Converter both the upstream and downstream 02 sensors. Has 2.49V on the return circuit and 4.9V on the signal circuit both up and down. I have checked and no visible connector problems. have rang out each wire going to bank 2 02 sensors. and have checked and double checked for exhaust leak none to be found. have had this car for almost 6 years approximately 59000 when purchased and have always maintained it on or before due dates.
any advise would be greatly appreciated! I am stuck have been dealing with this on and off for almost 2 weeks now .
Thanks
St smith
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When the check engine light comes back on(30 / 45 min drive) it has a total of 3 P0430 codes and it was my understanding that the permanent code would clear itself after I believe 3 drive cycles of it not throwing a P0430 code.
I just can not figure out why it keeps getting the codes
 

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When the check engine light comes back on(30 / 45 min drive) it has a total of 3 P0430 codes and it was my understanding that the permanent code would clear itself after I believe 3 drive cycles of it not throwing a P0430 code.
I just can not figure out why it keeps getting the codes
Ok, sorry I misunderstood your post. I didn't realize that it kept throwing the same codes.
 

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When the check engine light comes back on(30 / 45 min drive) it has a total of 3 P0430 codes and it was my understanding that the permanent code would clear itself after I believe 3 drive cycles of it not throwing a P0430 code.
I just can not figure out why it keeps getting the codes
Personally, I would start with new O2 sensors. Then if it persists, a new cat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have already installed a walker converter and bosch up and downstream sensors.
I appreciate your help though.
 

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You may need OEM sensors. Lots of people have had problems with o2 sensors that aren't factory parts for some reason.
 

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Have no details on how Dodge expects its techs to diagnose a P0420/P0430 code (converter operating below efficiency threshold).

With other cars the factory directed the tec to read the codes. If any error code pointing to a bad O2 sensor was present to replace the sensors indicated by the codes. Clear the codes and road test the car.

If the P0420/P0430 code comes back replace the converter indicated by the code.

If you have replaced the converter you must be sure the converter is good. I had one car with a very intermittent P0430 code. The code arose because the "brick" was loose and upon occasion would shift position and affect exhaust flow through the converter/brick.

I can tell you that if I didn't bother to clear the code it took more than 3 warm up cycles for the CEL to be extinguished. I do not recall ever bothering to check how long it took the permanent code to be cleared.

After putting up with this for some years but the car always passed CA smog checks rather than buy two new factory converters -- at over $1000/each not including labor to install -- I bought two used ones from a similar make/model/year car. I shook each converter to make sure its "brick" was secure. I turned each converter over and over to make sure nothing came out. Once I was satisfied I carefully carried these in my car to the dealer -- some 30 miles away -- and had the tech swap the "new" converters for the old ones.

The used (salvaged) converters worked very well.

But they were installed correctly. The tech ensured there were no exhaust leaks. I believe he used a smoke test to confirm this. He used all new factory gaskets. As an aside with another car -- fitted with two turbos -- the exhaust system used metal "o-rings" to seal the turbo it its exhaust pipe. Every time this connection was undone -- which was "often" in order to change the plugs or the water pump -- these o-rings were replaced. The tech said some DIY owners reuse these and the exhaust system leaks and this creates all kind of problems.

My point is no "expense" should be spared in ensuring the exhaust system, the converters, are properly secured and leak free.

With this car and at least one other I replaced the O2 sensors. With the car with the bad converter I replaced the sensors more than once. I drove the car to 317K miles and my experience is sensors lasted around 80K to 100K miles. With another car an O2 sensor code (bad heater) popped up at 132K miles. I replaced all 4 sensors.

I made it a point to use factory sensors. I had no desire to "test" aftermarket sensors to try to find a suitable factory sensor replacement.

It is imperative the sensor tip not be touched. Use no anti-seize on the threads. The factory sensor threads came coated with a light colored/almost clear grease like substance. Curious I did buy aftermarket sensors once and their threads were "dry".

Do not continuity test the sensor.

Do not clean the sensor's electrical socket/contacts with electrical cleaner. This goes for the wiring harness connector as well. Some sensors "breathe" through their wiring lead and using cleaner can foul the sensor.

Connector pins must be checked for any bent/damaged/broken pins. The new sensor wiring leads must be routed/secured correctly.

Just some detail to give you some indication of what level of effort there is to really deal with -- once and for all -- replacing a converter and/or O2 sensors.

In your case if the converter error comes back as active the replacement converter is suspect. Or its installation is suspect. Or as I mentioned above one (or more) O2 sensors are suspect especially if you didn't use factory sensors or handled/installed them incorrectly and the P0430 code has one or more O2 sensor codes with it.

Last but not least you have to be sure you replaced the converter associated with the P0430 code. IIRC this is the converter connected to the engine's #2 cylinder bank. P0420 is for the converter connected to the engine's #1 cylinder bank.
 

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Last but not least you have to be sure you replaced the converter associated with the P0430 code. IIRC this is the converter connected to the engine's #2 cylinder bank. P0420 is for the converter connected to the engine's #1 cylinder bank.
I would add that don't assume you know which bank is bank 1 and which is bank 2, same with plugs.
DON"T QUOTE ME, but I believe that the 3.6 is opposite just about every other V engine people are used to. By its design, in a "normal" (not transverse for FWD) mounting the passenger side head is the further forward head, and that is where cylinder #1 is, not the typical drivers side head.
If I am wrong, let me know and I will edit or delete this.
 

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I would add that don't assume you know which bank is bank 1 and which is bank 2, same with plugs.
DON"T QUOTE ME, but I believe that the 3.6 is opposite just about every other V engine people are used to. By its design, in a "normal" (not transverse for FWD) mounting the passenger side head is the further forward head, and that is where cylinder #1 is, not the typical drivers side head.
If I am wrong, let me know and I will edit or delete this.
My reference is the cylinder furthest away from the driver is the #1 cylinder. This is from my Bosch engine controller reference.

As an aside, this can cause some confusion. With a mid engine car with front of the engine just inches behind one's back this puts the #1 cylinder way the heck to the back of the engine -- at the transmission bellhousing end and on the passenger's side.

With a rear engine car with the front of the engine facing towards the rear the #1 cylinder is again on the passenger side but at least the #1 cylinder is at the "front" of the engine or is that considered the rear because of the direction the engine faces? Every time I had to know which was the #1 cylinder and thus which was bank 1 and which was bank 2 I had to refer to the factory engine cylinder numbering graphic to be sure.

But auto makers can make mistakes or just do it differently so one has to take the trouble to confirm just which converter the P0430 code refers to.
 

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Passenger side, front to back, 1 3 5
Driver side, front to back, 2 4 6

A Guy
 
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I will second using factory (OE) sensors. I have found many times that aftermarket sensors may be just enough out of factory specs to cause issues. Also, it sometimes is possible to narrow down between sensor and converter by swapping the sensors from side to side (Bank 1 to Bank 2) and seeing if the DTC changes accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks to all that replied I took the advise to go with factory sensors and it appears to have corrected the issue I still have the permanent code but at this point it is not getting the 2nd and 3rd.. the check engine light is not coming on and hopefully it will drop the permanent code on its own and was able to pass inspection today tht was the major concern
Thanks once again
Stsmith
 
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