Dodge Challenger Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
2018 Challenger R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I’m one of the idiots moving to Portland from Cali. and it might be snowing on the drive up. Any one have experience with some sort of snow tire device on a 20” wheel.
I have Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 tires (all seasons). I’m not looking for a permanent solution since I will be buying a Truck once I’m up in Portland. I just need something inexpensive to get me over the mountains in case it’s snowing. I’ve heard chains are not good for our cars. I’m hoping there is something else that someone has used with success. I’ve seen those snow socks but am not confident they work like they say. Any one ever use those?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
I’d try to find a set of used snow tires and rims off of CL or some other site. Throw them on, get where you’re going, take them off and if you never plan on using them again, put them up for sale. These cars do pretty well in the snow with snow tires. If you have the 4 piston Brembos, you can get away with 18x8 wheels as well which would be cheaper.
 

·
Registered
2018 Challenger R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I’d try to find a set of used snow tires and rims off of CL or some other site. Throw them on, get where you’re going, take them off and if you never plan on using them again, put them up for sale. These cars do pretty well in the snow with snow tires. If you have the 4 piston Brembos, you can get away with 18x8 wheels as well which would be cheaper.
Getting a second set of tires and wheels doesn’t work for my situation: I don’t have the funds and it adds more for me to ship (my current wheels). More tires and wheels, buying then selling, I’m so busy right now I don’t have the time to deal with that. Craig’s list is a shit show and it’s not likely anyone in the bay are will have snow tires.
I need something simple and inexpensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
You've mentioned them already - snow socks. They work. Just follow the instructions as to speed and when to take them off. I have a set in the boot just in-case.

The inspiration comes from polar bears feet - all furry. Mill girls in the mills in Lancashire and Yorkshire used to stretch woolly socks over the outside of their clogs for the walk to and from work. Snow stuck to the wool (and the polar bears furry feet) and snow grips snow - that's how winter tyres work - the sipes in the tyres hold snow . . .

Winter tyres on a spare set of rims is the better, safest option for continuous use though. Or stop somewhere until the roads are clear.
 

·
Registered
2018 Challenger R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You've mentioned them already - snow socks. They work. Just follow the instructions as to speed and when to take them off. I have a set in the boot just in-case.

The inspiration comes from polar bears feet - all furry. Mill girls in the mills in Lancashire and Yorkshire used to stretch woolly socks over the outside of their clogs for the walk to and from work. Snow stuck to the wool (and the polar bears furry feet) and snow grips snow - that's how winter tyres work - the sipes in the tyres hold snow . . .

Winter tyres on a spare set of rims is the better, safest option for continuous use though. Or stop somewhere until the roads are clear.
Have you ever used the socks? Yes, there are reviews online but I’m skeptical, I trust the people on here more than randos on Amazon. Plus I presume these socks might not work the same on all cars so I am hoping to get input from RWD Challenger/Charger owners.
And again, snow tires are just not an option.
 

·
Registered
2020 Challenger R/T Scat Pak
Joined
·
302 Posts
I have snow socks for another vehicle. They are not for high speed driving and are for getting you out of light to moderate snowy conditions. Just like chains they should be taken off as soon as possible when not absolutely needed. Traction Pads in the trunk are also an inexpensive way to get you going once your stuck. I say 2 pair because they are typically only 3-4 feet long. You can put 2 in a row to get a better run out, or use one for your vehicle and the other pair for a vehicle that might be pulling you out. They can be used at the front or rear wheels. Also, have a well made stow strap and gloves and something to kneel or lay on in wet snow if you need to.

Why do you call your self and idiot for moving from the Bay area to Portland? Just curious.

DeWFPo
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,522 Posts
Have you ever used the socks? Yes, there are reviews online but I’m skeptical, I trust the people on here more than randos on Amazon. Plus I presume these socks might not work the same on all cars so I am hoping to get input from RWD Challenger/Charger owners.
And again, snow tires are just not an option.
Are they still trashing Portland? I’d rethink going there as society is in a decline and will take close to forever to rebuild it if ever.
Newark NJ had riots in the 60’s and is still a hole in the earth and never came back nor will it ever. Drive safe.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grumpy59

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Snow tires will not be enough anyways, the most common chain control put in effect in the mountain passes you are talking about would require traction devices on at least 1 drive axle even if you have snow tires (unless you have awd) and traction devices on all 4 tires if not. Traction devices being either snow socks or chains/cables. I have not tried snow socks but I know they rewrote the California dot wording to include them for mountain chain control. If you get socks I’d just make sure the brand you get says they are approved for the states you plan on driving in.
Personally I’ll probably just get a set of cables for my Challenger before my first snow trip to Tahoe.
 

·
Registered
2018 Challenger R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Why do you call your self and idiot for moving from the Bay area to Portland? Just curious.

DeWFPo
I was just joking. If anything, I’m being smart by moving out of Ca. I can’t afford a home here. But I’m in escrow in Portland. Prices are a bit inflated but it’s half the cost of a house in the Bay Area. My only concern is that it’s turning into a mini Bay Area, I want Portland to stay Portland.
 

·
Registered
2018 Challenger R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Looking at snow socks now, they aren’t as inexpensive as I thought. $100 a set and I would likely need two sets.

I’m not looking for something to speed down the freeway, driving in snow requires slow driving in any condition IMO. It’s not likely I will need them so I need something quick and easy.


Anyone ever use something like this? They look like a one use deal but that’s kind of what I’m looking for.
1008590


I doubt they meet Ca standards though (all these laws are why I want to leave California. I don’t need the state telling me what is safe, freedom means I get to choose.)
 

·
Registered
2018 Challenger R/T Scat Pack
Joined
·
371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I can’t find a snow sock that will fit my rear tires, 315/35x20. There might not be a safe solution with my big @$$ tires. Think I will just have to wait out any snow storms through the mountain passes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
I've driven the most recent 10 winters on my Scat Pack and a Camaro SS before that, both 6-speed manuals. These socks aren't needed IMHO. Get a skinny rim/tire combo for the best snow experience. If you need a 20" that will work just fine and saves you the rim cost.

Just sell the snows on this forum after your season. People are always shopping for these.

20180209 160202


20171231 090041
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
I'm about 30 minutes from Downtown Portland and have lived in this part of the Pacific Northwest my entire life. Snow is very hit or miss here. Often it's under 1" and is gone by the middle of the same day.

Sometimes we do have heavy year where we will get 6"-8" but they do a good job keeping the roads clear. I think you may be sweating this a little more than you need to be. Winters here are mostly just rain.

I'm not really sure what mountains you are talking about, unless you are planning on going skiing. In the greater Portland metro area things are reasonably flat-ish except for the west hills (which is the problem area when we do have snow).
 

·
Registered
2020 SPS, M6, Go Mango
Joined
·
532 Posts
I'm about 30 minutes from Downtown Portland and have lived in this part of the Pacific Northwest my entire life. Snow is very hit or miss here. Often it's under 1" and is gone by the middle of the same day.

Sometimes we do have heavy year where we will get 6"-8" but they do a good job keeping the roads clear. I think you may be sweating this a little more than you need to be. Winters here are mostly just rain.

I'm not really sure what mountains you are talking about, unless you are planning on going skiing. In the greater Portland metro area things are reasonably flat-ish except for the west hills (which is the problem area when we do have snow).
I think he's talking specifically about the trip over. Not once he's there.

Are there any routes around that avoid a mountain pass?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
I've seen plenty pf people use socks and heard from work colleagues how they went from wheelspin and no movement other than sideways down the camber of the road to simply being able to drive out once they fitted them.

I've not used them myself - my everyday sensible car for over 25 years has been one of two Lancia Delta integrales I have owned (still got one) which is 4WD - on winter tyres, with a viscous centre diff, a torsen rear diff, it doesn't stop until the snow is deep enough to be forced under it and lift the wheels off the ground. Now that is a classic I can't afford to use all year round, I have an Alfa Romeo 159 Q4 saloon - again 4WD, but no locking diffs - its heavier and bigger than the Lancia so isn't as much fun or capable in bad weather.

I have been caught out once in the Challenger - I had all-season tyres on the rear (for some reason the previous owner in Houston fitted them??) and it surprised me how much grip they got - I was overtaking more cautious people - and too cautious is worse than no caution sometimes.
 

·
Registered
2020 Scat Pack Hellraisin Shaker
Joined
·
505 Posts
So I’m one of the idiots moving to Portland from Cali......My only concern is that it’s turning into a mini Bay Area, I want Portland to stay Portland.
In Oregon we welcome new Oregonians, but we invite Californians to go home. Portland is a different planet from Oregon, and it is not what it is reputed to be. Portland is an area where Oregonians do not frequent, go there at your own risk. This state is tearing itself apart with the dichotomy between Portland/Salem/Eugene and the rest of the state. Think twice before making what you are escaping to what you are escaping from.

As for the weather... If we get that heavy snow, just stay home. Rain and perpetual damp is something else. We are in that season right now. A bit of rain every day. Low clouds. No clear sunrise or sunset. Damp, damp, damp and always dim gray. I definitely see Challengers disappear from the roads this time of year. On the occasional clear, cold, & dry winter day you will see the 'toys' come out on the road. But even that is a risk due to the amount of gravel that gets put down on the icy days.

In inclement weather you are a safe driver. Cautious, easy on the gas, light on the brakes. Vehicle is prepared with snow tires, chains, etc. I get it. And at the next intersection a 20 year old minivan slides through the red-light and takes you out. Hope they have insurance, but don't count on it. Portland drivers simply do not know how to drive in frozen conditions. Again, best advice is to just stay home. Move to the Midwest if you want other drivers who know how to deal with bad driving conditions.

Portland drivers in bad weather. The people who stayed home and parked their vehicles on the street were not safe either.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top