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wow 6 gallons for less than $1. Yeah I remember all you needed was a $20. Now I pay about $60. Thankfully Costco has 91 gas that's cheaper than most places
 

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When I first got my license in 1972 I was able to buy gas for 29 cents a gallon . . . The oil embargo the next year in 1973 changed everything.
 

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Yeah, lots of cheap fuel around here in the mid 90's, 69 cents for regular was common as late as 1998 and even adjusted for today's value, that's only about $1.08 per gallon. The mid 80's was cheap compared to inflation too, and maybe the cheapest ever.

My Dad told me that when he bought his first car (a 35 Graham) in 1941 that gas in NO was 25 cents per gallon. Sounded good except that 25 cents in 1941 would be worth $4.36 today!

When I got my first car in 1978, it was 47 cents per gallon at the local station. Put $5 in and cruise all weekend!


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When I first got my license in 1972 I was able to buy gas for 29 cents a gallon . . . The oil embargo the next year in 1973 changed everything.
1971 I remember 23.9 per gal., then to McDonalds for 25 cheeseburgers and fries.

Crap, where did the time go, now I am 65 and 5 months away from retirement.

Enjoy your kids growing up, life flies by really fast.

:cheers::cheers::cheers:
 

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1971 I remember 23.9 per gal., then to McDonalds for 25 cheeseburgers and fries.

Crap, where did the time go, now I am 65 and 5 months away from retirement.

Enjoy your kids growing up, life flies by really fast.

:cheers::cheers::cheers:
I always like the McDonald's comparison better. In my days, it was $1 total. Hamburger, small fries, and small coke PLUS tax. IIRC total was $0.98 so $1 was exactly what I needed. Then quickly, it was $1.10, then the rest was a blur.

P.S. On a different note, I sometimes wondered why back then, that was enough. Today, it seems like a Double-Double+fries+all you can drink still leave me some room for more...Was the McDonald's hamburger "bigger" back then? Food seems to pack more punch back then..
 

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.55 / gallon in '78 in Northern CA. By '80 it was over $1
 

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NOT MUCH HAS CHANGED.
Sure, gas was 30 cents or so per gallon when I started driving in '71, but then my part time job paid 1.15 per hour. Do some simple math and ya see that gas prices haven't changed much compared to the typical paycheck.

HOWEVER
Two huge items do indeed make a difference. My 392 consistently averages 20 mpg around town. Back in the 60's, this kind of horsepower netted something like 6-9 mpg. Add to that I don't have to wrench on my car every weekend. The Hemi has been bulletproof since the day I bought it (used) nearly two years ago.

NOW DO THE MATH:
...the good old days weren't so good after all.
:)
 

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Yeah, I remember the oil embargo of 1973. I was living in Phoenix and there was a major gas station on all four corners of every major intersection. I was voted to be the one to stand in the long, long lines to get gas for my Grandmother's Dodge Dart. Only 10 gallons were allowed to be pumped. You didn't go far with 10 gallons back then. I too, remember the $1.00 it cost for two McD's burgers, small fries and small drink. After they introduced unleaded gas in 1975, car parts stores here used to have a big box of about 3" long plastic tubes for .50 cents. Their purpose? One end was big enough to accept a leaded gas pump nozzle and the other end was small enough to fit an unleaded filler neck. So if you didn't want to pay for unleaded, no problem. Toss leaded in there. We didn't care if the cats got burned out anyway. Just before the 1979 oil shortage people were proclaiming that gas would "never hit a dollar a gallon".
 

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Yeah, I remember the oil embargo of 1973. I was living in Phoenix and there was a major gas station on all four corners of every major intersection. I was voted to be the one to stand in the long, long lines to get gas for my Grandmother's Dodge Dart. Only 10 gallons were allowed to be pumped. You didn't go far with 10 gallons back then. I too, remember the $1.00 it cost for two McD's burgers, small fries and small drink. After they introduced unleaded gas in 1975, car parts stores here used to have a big box of about 3" long plastic tubes for .50 cents. Their purpose? One end was big enough to accept a leaded gas pump nozzle and the other end was small enough to fit an unleaded filler neck. So if you didn't want to pay for unleaded, no problem. Toss leaded in there. We didn't care if the cats got burned out anyway. Just before the 1979 oil shortage people were proclaiming that gas would "never hit a dollar a gallon".
I'm guessing we have to be the same age range, but I don't remember those plastic tubes to defeat unleaded gas, if you wanted to. Someone came up with a great money making idea there!

My memory goes back to 29 Cents a gallon, but this was way before I was old enough to drive. I remember driving my '74 Dart back in the late 70's. The gas prices were climbing, but I thought they couldn't go over $1.00 a gallon because the rollers on the gas pumps could only go up to 99 Cents a gallon. So, in their infinite wisdom, gas stations started charging by the half gallon until they updated the pumps.

SOO you can plainly see, I wasn't all that smart as a teenager. :surprise:
 

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I'm guessing we have to be the same age range, but I don't remember those plastic tubes to defeat unleaded gas, if you wanted to. Someone came up with a great money making idea there!

I'm 64. How about the "cow magnet" craze of the late '70s. Do you remember that one? Slip a cow magnet over your fuel line just before the carburetor and supposedly the magnetic field will magically rearrange the gas molecules to burn better.
 

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I guess you've never been to a drive-in theater... :grin2:
Good one, Gila.
Do I remember drive-ins? Good grief. My very earliest memories involved climbing into the trunk about 1 block before we got to the drive-in so mom and dad only had to pay for two admissions. Once inside, dad would retrieve me out of the trunk over behind the concession stand where no cars were, and I scrambled into the back seat. I was usually wearing my jammies so after I fell asleep later on (I never managed to stay awake to watch both movies), mom could get me tucked into bed easily enough when I got home.

Drive-ins were falling out of favor by the early seventies when I started dating: we spent more time at parties and football games and such.
 

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My last drive in movie was in the mid to late 90s. My first drive in was Star Wars.
Drive-ins bring back some great memories, my 57 Chevy, and couple hot lil sweet hearts make for great memories getting old.

Heres couple shots I took in recent years.

:icon_cheers::icon_cheers::icon_cheers:
 

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Drive-ins bring back some great memories, my 57 Chevy, and couple hot lil sweet hearts make for great memories getting old.

Heres couple shots I took in recent years.

:icon_cheers::icon_cheers::icon_cheers:
Here's some info about my old local drive in, but not the last one I went to.



Johnny All Weather Drive-In

One of the largest drive-ins in the country, the Johnny All Weather Drive-In covered 28 acres, featured two screens and a 2,500 car capacity. A number of amenities were offered that went beyond films, including a trolley that took patrons to an on-site amusement park and playground, a full-service cafeteria with seating on the roof and an air-conditioned 1,200-seat indoor theater for inclement weather that merited a September 1957 Popular Science article shortly after it opened. Located across from an ice and roller rink, the Copiague drive-in closed in 1984 and is now the site of a Home Depot, Target and a Red Lobster.


Johnny All-Weather Drive-in Theatre was located in Copiague, New York

This is the final drive in I went to.

Westbury Drive-In
7000 Brush Hollow Road, Westbury

This three-screen behemoth opened in 1953, had a 1,189-car capacity and added its third screen in 1976. It was the last gasp for drive-ins on Long Island, being the last one in operation before closing in 1998. Cinema lives on as its replacement is United Artists Westbury 12, which also shares space with a BJ’s Wholesale Club.

This last one, also close to me, had regular weekend showings of the Rocky Horror Picture Show.

Bay Shore Sunrise Drive-In
1881 Sunrise Hwy.
Bay Shore
Opened in 1955, the Bay Shore Drive-In was purchased by United Artists in 1968 and added a second screen in 1979. After closing in 1990, it was torn down and now the site of a Home Depot and Shop Rite plaza.
 

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Here's some info about my old local drive in, but not the last one I went to.



Johnny All Weather Drive-In

One of the largest drive-ins in the country, the Johnny All Weather Drive-In covered 28 acres, featured two screens and a 2,500 car capacity. A number of amenities were offered that went beyond films, including a trolley that took patrons to an on-site amusement park and playground, a full-service cafeteria with seating on the roof and an air-conditioned 1,200-seat indoor theater for inclement weather that merited a September 1957 Popular Science article shortly after it opened. Located across from an ice and roller rink, the Copiague drive-in closed in 1984 and is now the site of a Home Depot, Target and a Red Lobster.


Johnny All-Weather Drive-in Theatre was located in Copiague, New York

This is the final drive in I went to.

Westbury Drive-In
7000 Brush Hollow Road, Westbury

This three-screen behemoth opened in 1953, had a 1,189-car capacity and added its third screen in 1976. It was the last gasp for drive-ins on Long Island, being the last one in operation before closing in 1998. Cinema lives on as its replacement is United Artists Westbury 12, which also shares space with a BJ’s Wholesale Club.

This last one, also close to me, had regular weekend showings of the Rocky Horror Picture Show.

Bay Shore Sunrise Drive-In
1881 Sunrise Hwy.
Bay Shore
Opened in 1955, the Bay Shore Drive-In was purchased by United Artists in 1968 and added a second screen in 1979. After closing in 1990, it was torn down and now the site of a Home Depot and Shop Rite plaza.


Wish I was around for all of these , I was still a wee lad when my parents had taken me to the last one I know of in Rocky Point ! I believe it’s now a golf course:( any how , thanks for the history:)


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