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Discussion Starter #1
I am a pretty new Challenger owner (since the summer) and I'm now getting really curious about what my R/T can actually do. I've been driving stick for the last 18 years but never had a lot of horsepower nor a reason to dump the clutch or do burn outs. Now that my car is fairly broken in and I'm very comfortable with the clutch and the shifting, I'm wanting to have some fun with this baby... But not at the expense of ruining my clutch. I've read some horror stories about people ruining their cars trying to do burn outs and so I'm a bit nervous about doing something stupid.

So my question - what is way you'd recommend to dump the clutch, not for a burnout but just to get those wheels spinning and lay some serious tracks? Is dumping the clutch literally pulling your foot off the clutch from the floor with zero feathering? It seems that the clutch engages pretty high up, so my instinct is to put down the clutch, shift into first, rev up higher than usual (to say 3500?) and ease up on the clutch until right before I know it will engage, and then let it up completely and push the gas to the floor. Does this sound right? How do you dump (RPMs, etc(

I have a 2013 rt plus 6 speed.

I appreciate your input! Thanks in advance!
 

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You don't want to do a high(er) rpm clutch side step and dump - you'll get wheel hop...and its bad on the differential.

Do that enough and you'll end up changing the clearances in the diff and end up with a whining/howling diff.

It takes feathering the throttle ~ 2,500rpm and modulating the throttle to get an effective launch.
If you slip the clutch a lot a higher rpm, you'll overheat the lining and shorten the clutch's life (they aren't cheap to replace).
 

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Gotta agree. This is my first IRS car, and dumping the clutch at fairly high revs results in nasty wheel hop. This is also somewhat dependent on the tires. Feathering the gas really works best for burnouts and such. My R/T is also my daily driver, so I try to take it somewhat easy on it. I love my Challenger, but I'm going back to a solid axle car after this one. Nothing better than just smokin' em at will.
 

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If you want to just smoke some tires, test drive the newer Mustangs. Waste their clutches.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys.

I'm not looking to do burouts, just want to know the safest way to jump off a line and lay a nice set of tracks behind me on rare occasion.

So it sounds like the higher RPM dump is where a lot of people get into trouble and 2500 is a safe ceiling. with this particular clutch does it matter if HOW you release it when "dumping"? I've always eased off the clutch, not just yanked my foot off it like I see some people do.

Sorry for the basic questions here , just wanting to do it the right way. I appreciate your time!
 

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Thanks guys.

I'm not looking to do burouts, just want to know the safest way to jump off a line and lay a nice set of tracks behind me on rare occasion.

So it sounds like the higher RPM dump is where a lot of people get into trouble and 2500 is a safe ceiling. with this particular clutch does it matter if HOW you release it when "dumping"? I've always eased off the clutch, not just yanked my foot off it like I see some people do.

Sorry for the basic questions here , just wanting to do it the right way. I appreciate your time!

Practice, practice and practice! These clutches are pretty heavy duty and I doubt you will hurt it by learning how to lay some rubber. Practice on wet roads first and turn off TC. If it starts to hop, lay off the gas. I get best results by quickly letting off the clutch and then go WOT.
 

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You don't want to do a high(er) rpm clutch side step and dump - you'll get wheel hop...and its bad on the differential.

Do that enough and you'll end up changing the clearances in the diff and end up with a whining/howling diff.

It takes feathering the throttle ~ 2,500rpm and modulating the throttle to get an effective launch.
If you slip the clutch a lot a higher rpm, you'll overheat the lining and shorten the clutch's life (they aren't cheap to replace).
I guess this explains people complaining about whinning/howling rear ends.
A little Hotrodding is fun,but if someone abuses their cars,expect something to break!

When I was teenager,and something would break,Dad would say.YOU'VE BEEN HOTRODDING AGAIN! You broke it,you fix it.I became a pretty good wrench though.
 

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get a hopnot kit for that thing and blow through tires all day! my car will cleanly smoke the tires at higher rpm launches with it.
 

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Just a little practice is all it takes. Don't be too abrupt with either foot and rpms below 3000. The main objective is to keep from upsetting the suspension to avoid wheel hop by feeding in clutch and throttle at an accelerated level. Dumping is not good.
 

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On my 10 R/T with 3.92 gears, I take the traction control off, set the tack at 1500, pop the clutch and push the gas to the floor. It burns for about 20' or so with slight hopage but nothing serious.
 

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Mike,
This works for me...ESP off, in 2nd gear, with clutch up near engagement, floating the throttle between 3000-4000...Now lift the clutch and mash the throttle!

I get a 100' + or so of rubber and NO wheel hop...when the rev limiter hits...you're done, look in the mirror.

I have a 10, STP car. I get wheel hop in the rain, but not on dry pavement...odd huh?
 

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Had a little play time this morning after work. Cold dry pavement and tires=predictable results. 10 mph 1st gear roll and hammer throttle.......instant loss of traction and then a quick shift with little let off to 2nd and hammer down again..............very satisfying burnout. Again the idea is not to upset the rear end. Once a smooth break of traction is attained from 1st each shift afterwards must be done quickly and precisely to keep the rear in total balance. An abrupt lift in throttle or clutch will start the rear into rocking while it gains and then loses traction (hop). If wishing to sit and burn 'em down the same applies to use of the brake. Only enough pressure to hold the fronts and the car.
 

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Just got my car back from the dealer. I don't know the history on it for the first 3100 miles as the owner of the dealership I bought it at drove it for a couple months plus countless test drives I'm sure. I got 20% off sticker and all the warranties were extended out 3100 miles so it was a pretty good price at the time. I drove it for a couple years and tried different launches now and then and encountered wheel hop probably 10 times or so. Some times it was significant. The pavement always made a difference. One day, the diff started whining. I ignored it since it wasn't getting worse and have heard that stuff before in the old days. It wasn't real bad but I could hear it and it was annoying. No clunking or anything, just deaccel whine. I decided when I heard another noise in the front of the engine, to take it in for that and have them service the diff while I was at it. The diff fluid reportedly had metal debris and when they opened it up I guess it wasn't pretty so the tech said it was toast. They ended up replacing the diff and the water pump (unrelated). The factory tires were a bit sticky and the current tires are harder so they burn easier (less wheel hop) and I don't go around burning rubber all the time either. It's all quiet now.

The moral to the story, wheel hop is bad and a huge stress on the diff and axles. If you are getting wheel hop, don't tolerate it or you may have big problems.
 
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