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Hi All,
I can not find information regarding this.

I would like to know what shaft the pump runs off of (if applicable)

I encounter several hills where I work that I can coast a good ways, but I don't want to starve my 6spd of lubrication.

Much thanks!
 

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Personally, I'd just go neutral if coasting for a long way, saves the throw out bearing. I assume there is no pump internal to the M6, just slinging lube off the lower gears. In neutral, both input and output are turning, just not engaged to each other, so full lube.
 

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Hi All,
I can not find information regarding this.

I would like to know what shaft the pump runs off of (if applicable)

I encounter several hills where I work that I can coast a good ways, but I don't want to starve my 6spd of lubrication.

Much thanks!
There is no caution about coasting or towing a 6-speed manual transmission equipped car in my Hellcat owners manual. (There are cautions about both of these actions in the A8 transmission section of the manual.)

I am not aware -- but I'm no expert -- of a fluid pump in the manual. AFAIK the transmission is splash lubricated. Unlike the A8 which has a pump driven via the input shaft connected to the engine. If the engine is running the pump is pumping. Which is why coasting with the engine off or towing the car supported by its rear wheels is forbidden.

While I occasionally encounter hills (mountains) which are steep enough the car can coast and maintain speed (highway speed at that) I never bother -- when I am in a manual equipped car -- to shift to neutral and coast. If I were to coast the car I would never coast with just the clutch pedal depressed. This subjects the throw out bearing to extra wear and tear.

When on a down hill/mountain section of road except once or twice -- when I was curious about just how well the car could maintain speed -- I never coast out of gear. In some cases I even leave the cruise control active as often the steepness of the grade changes and the car can begin to lose speed. A few times on some sections of road the grade is steep enough that speed can increase and rather than downshift to 5th gear I just tap the brakes when necessary which is just once or twice maybe to keep the car's speed within reason. Whether excessive speed is obtained using the throttle or just coasting if one is clocked by a radar gun there's going to be a ticket. It is the driver's responsibility to maintain control and operate the vehicle within the law at all times. Coasting down a hill doesn't suspend the driver's responsibility in this regard.
 

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Whether with the clutch depressed or in Neutral, coasting is a bad habit and even illegal in many cases.

If I had to do it for some weird reason, as much as I'd like to spare the throwout bearing, it's probably safer to ride the clutch.
Getting the trans back in gear if something unexpected happens is not likely to be as fast.

I'd happily spend the extra $0.003 if fuel to have full control over the vehicle, possibly even avoid getting ticketed.
 

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2018 Dodge Challenger T/A Plus in Yellow Jacket w/5.7L and A8 automatic
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Whether with the clutch depressed or in Neutral, coasting is a bad habit and even illegal in many cases.

If I had to do it for some weird reason, as much as I'd like to spare the throwout bearing, it's probably safer to ride the clutch.
Getting the trans back in gear if something unexpected happens is not likely to be as fast.

I'd happily spend the extra $0.003 if fuel to have full control over the vehicle, possibly even avoid getting ticketed.
More importantly.......to leave the manual transmission vehicle in neutral, when parked, relying only on the parking brake to keep it stationary, or leave it in gear, AND apply the parking brake to keep it stationary? :geek:
 

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I don't get the neutral thing, who cares if you can coast down a hill, why the desire to put the car in neutral? Think there's way more risk of messing something up getting it back in gear if you don't rev match properly than anything you could possibly save.

On the parking, always park the car with the transmission in the lowest gear (1st or R) with the parking brake firmly applied. We had someone here not long ago who's car rolled down a steep driveway and was damaged. It had the brake on but was parked in neutral and the brake obviously wasn't enough to hold it.




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I don't get the neutral thing, who cares if you can coast down a hill, why the desire to put the car in neutral? Think there's way more risk of messing something up getting it back in gear if you don't rev match properly than anything you could possibly save.
I get it, a lot. Simple explanation, fun. There are 3 roads near me that you can literally go 2 miles or a bit more, if you make the light right in neutral, at normal traffic speeds. I used to drive home from work one of them years ago working 3-11, so at 11:30 nobody on the road, I would love to do the coasting challenge. As for the whole rev matching... If you can't do that in a stick, you probably shouldn't have one. And I used to do that in my old Shelby Charger Turbo, and again in my Crossfire.
Actually, in the old Shelby Charger, I would shut the car off altogether, but that was a very light car, and at speed you didn't need the power steering, it was a fun challenge taking windy turns as fast as you could with minimal braking to keep all possible speed to see if you could make it all the way across the flat parts. All while basically at legal speeds, under 50.
 

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I get it, a lot. Simple explanation, fun. There are 3 roads near me that you can literally go 2 miles or a bit more, if you make the light right in neutral, at normal traffic speeds. I used to drive home from work one of them years ago working 3-11, so at 11:30 nobody on the road, I would love to do the coasting challenge. As for the whole rev matching... If you can't do that in a stick, you probably shouldn't have one. And I used to do that in my old Shelby Charger Turbo, and again in my Crossfire.
Actually, in the old Shelby Charger, I would shut the car off altogether, but that was a very light car, and at speed you didn't need the power steering, it was a fun challenge taking windy turns as fast as you could with minimal braking to keep all possible speed to see if you could make it all the way across the flat parts. All while basically at legal speeds, under 50.
Knew a guy who lived in the mountains north of Sunol, CA. He said he could coast several miles from his drive to the main road. So pretty much he'd start his car's engine and back the car out of the garage then get the car rolling and shift into neutral -- manual -- and coast the rest of the way down to the town.

I certainly would not coast with the engine off in a car equipped with an automatic transmission.

I would not even coast with the engine running and the automatic in neutral as I would worry about the shift at speed from neutral to drive. The shift really only happens, should only happen, with the car stationary.

There is also the concern if the transmission is in neutral and for some reason due to an "emergency" you need to shift to drive unexpectedly you inadvertently bump the transmission lever into reverse or even park.

Coasting in neutral could violate a vehicle traffic code. There is almost certainly a law (kind of a catch all law) that states to the effect the driver must maintain control of the vehicle at all times. Coasting in neutral could be a violation of that. While you have steering and braking control you do not have acceleration control. That you can probably reacquire it with a shift to drive this still requires an extra action. No one would disable steering or braking even if either could be restored with the flip of a switch and the same should be the case for acceleration.

While we all like to have fun in our cars they are not toys but very powerful, heavy machines. If not treated with the respect they deserve "fun" can turn into tragedy in the blink of an eye. IOWs, your right to have fun with your car ends when you no longer have full control of the vehicle, as least on a public road.
 

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I get it, a lot. Simple explanation, fun.
Actually, in the old Shelby Charger, I would shut the car off altogether, but that was a very light car, and at speed you didn't need the power steering, it was a fun challenge taking windy turns as fast as you could with minimal braking to keep all possible speed to see if you could make it all the way across the flat parts.
Yes, it was fun. And quite dangerous at times, but there's no denying that it was fun.

Of course, I got over that whole soap box derby car thing at the age of seven, or so.
Now that I can drive self propelled vehicles - legally, no less - there are so many other things that interest me more than experiencing gravity at work.
 

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Neutral uses more gas than going down a hill in gear with your foot off the gas, the injectors are shut off in that situation so no gas being burned.

But I get the fun part.

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Not in older cars, they used fuel no matter what I don't know when they started the decal fuel cut off, but it sure wasn't in the 80s. And I mentioned I would actually shut it off entirely. BUT, I knew what the car was like without power steering, and once vacuum was gone and brakes were full manual. I used to do it in my old cars, my Sunbird (1980 RWD, not FWD Cavalier based) was manual steering, and my Dodge Vans as well, one didn't even have power brakes, so literally no difference. Point is, know what your car is like before you get adventurous, more fun, more safe, and better prepared for when something fails. Otherwise you end up on YouTube like all of the Mustang "Crowd Slayer" editions.
 

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Just remembered that I have coasted several times, on purpose, but it was in Neutral with an automatic.
At the time I lived where there was an 8-mile long 8% grade, which I took advantage of.

My reason for doing it? It was a vaguely scientific way to deternine the rolling resistance of various tires that I had to test. It was less fun than just driving, of course, but it did serve a purpose.
 

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Ok, why....? Not being a smart ass but I know that I personally spent a lot of money for the performance. I can do the coasting with some plywood with recycled bicycle wheels. With all of that power we paid for, why not see how much speed one can achieve in the same stretch. Just kdding of course but the logic is similar don't you think? Go find some twisty's (roads for you coasters), down shift that thing and drive the corners like it was meant to be driven. Jut sayin'. I know, I know, it's just like at car shows and some of the things you see there. To each their own, before someone tags me for it.
 

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Ok, why....?
Like I said earlier, fun. Why do people go balls out and slide into crouds, fun. But this is at legal speeds, and no sliding around. One road near me, PA RT 48 going from RT 51 north towards the Boston Bridge. It is a continuous down slope a the beginning with a twisty start and some stiff turns. You have to keep your speed up at the beginning, to make the flat part at the end, and if you make the light, you can cross the river uphill on the bridge.
not sure if that will work or not. You can only do it late at night when traffic is light, and there is no stop signs or red lights until the bridge. (at least there wasn't years ago)
Also coasting with a stick is safe as you can get, no different than shifting slowly, REAL slowly. With an automatic, you have to leave it running or you can have wear concerns, and the big issue is DO NOT PUT IT BACK IN D WHILE MOVING. Computerized trannys can get totally confused, and old school ones may start in 1st. So damage/lockup can occur, know your car before playing!
 

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H
Whether with the clutch depressed or in Neutral, coasting is a bad habit and even illegal in many cases.

If I had to do it for some weird reason, as much as I'd like to spare the throwout bearing, it's probably safer to ride the clutch.
Getting the trans back in gear if something unexpected happens is not likely to be as fast.

I'd happily spend the extra $0.003 if fuel to have full control over the vehicle, possibly even avoid getting ticketed.
Hi Jimmy,
I was going to post the same comment and I'm glad you brought this to the thread. It is indeed unsafe to coast in any case whether a manual or automatic. As you indicated, in a situation that would require a quick control response, you couldn't get get in gear quick enough to gain full control of the car. Good post!
Rick
 
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