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I've recently updated the head unit and all 6 speakers in my 2012 SXT. Side note, a friends of mine has an R/T and said his didn't have dash speakers. I thought that was strange that if my SXT base had 6, his "big boy" R/T should have at least 6, and maybe 8 to coincide with his cylinder count. My humor of the day, sorry.

I updated the head unit to a JVC KW-AV61BT and am very pleased with it. The Bluetooth mic took a few tries to find the right spot to avoid electro-interference while the car is running, with enviro fans running. Original mic location on the steering column caused a massive humming to people on the other side of the call. I wound up re-stringing the mic across the passenger side, under the dash, up the A-post, and across the headliner (tucked in), and attached to the rear-view mirror. Testing at running speed checked out.

In the dash, I installed 3.5" polk's which sound great, but need bass blockers for higher volume. Will elaborate in a sec. I installed Kenwood 6x9's tri's in the doors, which also sound great, and need no adjusting. In the rear deck I installed Infinity Kappas. They sound great without the rear deck slipped back on, yet sound a tad muffled after re-installing the cheesy rear deck dashboard.

While at this time I do not want to go about installing an after market amp, i'm thinking the 2 dash speaker feeds are tied to the 2 door speaker feeds as the "front" channels. While the door speaker Kenwoods provide great low end, mid, and high range, they are naturally low to the floor. The dash speakers are great for the high end freq's bouncing off the windshield, as expected. With my thought of the dash's and door's somewhat tied together as the 2 front speaker channels, I am planning on adding 600mhz passive bass blockers, to then leave the door speakers for the low end feel. The wife & I already enjoy the thump in the feet, legs, seat and back when it's a jamming lol.

Now my 2 dilemna's and asking for other's ideas. I'm looking to dial back the dash speaker only volume just slightly than the door speaker. I'm looking for balance on the fronts. Is there such a beast like a "capacitor" similar to a bass blocker, yet would attenuate the volume or in-line voltage to specific speakers? Maybe something that would reduce the voltage by lets say 10%? I think that would balance the dash's against the door speakers. The head unit does have fader control (and works unlike some that have had that problem), but is only front to back, with the front controlling dash & door speakers at the same time. Any thoughts other than a 6 channel amp to adjust line outputs?

2nd dilemma, I cringe at cutting anything in the car. Ok speaker wires is one thing lol. But i'm looking to cutout the speaker area on the rear window dashboard and install the speaker grilles for the infinity's. Has anyone else cut the rear deck dash? Any templates out there?
 

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Yes, you can buy attenuators to reduce the amplitude of the dash speakers. What you are experiencing isn't uncommon. My crossovers with my sundowner has a -3db and a -6db attenuation and I have mine at -6db. I would have to do some research for you to find what you need product wise.

Cutting your rear deck isn't too bad. I hacked mine up in haste and it left me pissed and in a more difficult situation. My suggestion is to find suitable speaker grills to top mount and then trace the inside of the mounting ring. Then, cut it out with a knife and take your time. You may also want to sound dampen the deck while its exposed. That is how I would go about it had I done things the right way and not in haste.

If you went with a good outboard amp, you would have crossover controls eliminating need for bass blockers and other such materials. You could go with something from audio control that could do what you need but it might be the same cost of an outboard amp. I'd have to do some research
 

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With my thought of the dash's and door's somewhat tied together as the 2 front speaker channels, I am planning on adding 600mhz passive bass blockers, to then leave the door speakers for the low end feel.
I assume you meant 600 Hz, not MHz. Do you know if your factory stereo has a factory amplifier? The behavior of the fader and the number of speakers certainly suggests so, but you might know better than I do. Dodge changed the stereos year to year. I ask because a factory amplifier will already have crossovers built in (bass blockers in the case of the dash speakers), so if you're getting poor results from the dash speakers, a bass blocker probably won't help it because the bass is already being blocked.

Is there such a beast like a "capacitor" similar to a bass blocker, yet would attenuate the volume or in-line voltage to specific speakers? Maybe something that would reduce the voltage by lets say 10%? I think that would balance the dash's against the door speakers. The head unit does have fader control (and works unlike some that have had that problem), but is only front to back, with the front controlling dash & door speakers at the same time. Any thoughts other than a 6 channel amp to adjust line outputs?
A resistor is what you'd need to reduce the volume, but it gets tricky. Resistor's convert current to heat. The problem is, most resistors aren't made for current levels present in car stereos. The other problem is that adding DC resistance to an AC circuit will have other effects on the frequency response of the speaker that depend on the specs of the particular speaker. A capacitor will give you the effect of a bass blocker if you hook it up in parallel with the speaker. Good for a low pass filter, not for an attenuation. Your problem here is speaker sensitivity. The easiest fix would be to match the door speakers make/model to the dash, or the dash speakers to the doors. Otherwise, equalization is your other "easy" option, but it's a bit limited for the factory system. An aftermarket amplifier would give you this option as well by adjusting gain values on the channels. The factory amp doesn't have this option built-in. Lastly, you could install a component system that is designed to work with itself. These come with a woofer plus a tweeter, and are designed as a package deal. Presumably the designers did a good job of balancing the highs and the lows, but you'd want to demo them before pulling the trigger.
 
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