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Discussion Starter #1
Have a 2015 Challenger SRT. I am not mechanically inclined/own no tools, this is also my first expensive/high performance (for me anyway) car. Drove all my other cars in my life till they died, emergency surgery only. I love cars but I don't know much beyond having a basic understanding of how a car works. I just like to drive them. Have had it for two
years 18k miles 15k of it highway miles on two big road trips. Love the radar cruise control! The dealer has shocked me, with a quote for breaks that I will be needing soon, according to the inspection during recent oil change at said dealer . They say the rotors can't be turned and must be replaced, but they want almost two thousand dollars for just the two back rotors alone. I knew it wasn't going to be cheap to maintain, and hoped to own it for a long time, but over 3k for brakes has me wondering if I bit off more than I could chew. And that sucks cause I love my SRT. Here is the invoice for parts and labor with the final total penned in.


I am going to have to go to some other place than the dealer to get brakes if I am going to keep it. I am hoping for general advice on where to start on looking parts, prices and
type of mechanic/shops and places to research.
 

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Sounds like somebody is blowing smoke up somewhere! With 90% of your mileage highway and under 20,000 miles, you should not need brakes at all! And rear seldom wear out before fronts. Your quote shows pad kits front and rear and 2 rotors. Take some pics of you rotors to share here. Some one else here may be more informed about the Brembos costs and wear factors but I would be dealing with a different dealer.

Keny B

2015 SRT 392
 

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2015 SRT392 A8 in white pearl coat
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I have the same car, same year.
Since when does a car need rotors, especially the rears, in 15k miles? I've never heard of anything like this in 45 years of working on cars. Somebody's pulling your leg. Do you have any reason to think that there's something wrong with your back brakes? I'm starting to wonder when I read posts like this what the factory is putting in those pads. I see the insane amount of brake dust they generate, but I'm wondering if they put sandpaper in them... :)
Here's your solution: Using the info placed on this forum in the last 30 days, buy a a full set of brake pads (front and rear) for your car.

Here's what I bought online from Jegg's for about 102 bucks (to my door) just a month ago:
Front pads Powerstop Z23-1053
Rear pads, Powerstop Z23-1405

Get rid of those disk eating factory pads ASAP.

Watch a couple videos on how to do a brake job on an Challenger. Easy peasy. Find a friend who works on cars. Ask him to put on your new pads for ya. For 100 bucks and a pizza, you're done.

And don't ever consider allowing a dealership to do your brakes again.

Too bad you don't live in Spring Hill Florida. You'd have new brakes and I'd be enjoying a free pizza.

Guessing you live by Medford Oregon, judging by the dealership quote you posted. Any forum members around Medford that could help?
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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My $0.02 - the dealership has given you a quote for the max amount of work/parts they think they can safely get away with to make some money and still appear to be on the up and up.

HOWEVER, unless your brakes are exhibiting some serious vibration/screeching/etc. during use, most of what they have quoted is not necessary.

Q: Will you have fully functional brakes once they are done with their $3K brake job?
A: Absolutley!

Q: Could you have them just do the pads and leave the rotors alone and still have fully functional brakes once they are done (assuming your brakes are NOT exhibiting anything out of the ordinary in the way of noise/vibration/etc., that is)?
A: Absolutley! And your cost will be significantly lower going this route - $617 for parts + their labor.

Now, if you are willing to go the route of a "pads only" brake job, you can certainly entertain the idea having the brake job done elsewhere (not at the dealership) to save even more money. But to save the most cheddar and still come away with functioning brakes, you could buy the parts yourself and either install them or have a buddy/friend/acquaintance do the installation for you (by plying him with something good, like a case of beer). But this may or may not be possible for your situation, so you'd have to factor that in however it would fit obviously.

Honestly, I would be surprised if the car needed back pads, and I would be absolutely stunned if it needed rear rotors.

Does it need front rotors? Maybe, just depends on how it's acting now. My initial guess would be "no" (but that's merely a hunch without more information about current behavior).

Whatever it needs, I can virtually assure you that it does NOT all four rotors replaced. If it does, then you sir having been having TOO much fun in that car and need to tap the brakes, figuratively speaking of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I didnt mean to imply that they were recommending immediate change but that it would be in the near future. And other than a little squealing from time to time they feel like they should. I should also say that, while never tracked, at least 500 miles on empty mountain roads. Not recklessly( and mostly in the lines as there are such this as logging trucks and rocks around here lol) , but I did work the the car and the brakes hard a quite a few times. I don't mind paying a shop that stands behind their work, and I wouldn't ride in a car I worked on. I don't mind and can afford to pay a reasonable price, I just dont want to work on it is just not my thing. Plus the start up costs of the tools. If I can pay 500-1000 every 25000 miles for brakes, I can deal with it. I get my joy from driving it. Its long story, but I live a long way from where I grew up, and I dont know anybody I can ask that knows about cars. I am completely lost when it comes to cars, and the dealer probably do saw me coming the day I bought it. And with no one to ask, I don't know which shop to trust not to screw me. I have thought of trading it in on a 370z or something in that 30-40k range that is sporty instead of buying brakes. Basically I don't know how to tell a good mechanic making an honest buck, to one who will take advantage of me. I admit it is a character flaw :)
 

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Thats what OEM parts cost.

Weather or not youll need to change all 4 rotors is another story. You cant cut the SRT Rotor.

At 15k Miles I doubt youd have to change the rears.

The cost for factory replacement parts from Dodge is what it is.
 

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I have a 43,000 mile 2015 SRT 392, and it still has its original rotors. I'd definitely get it checked out by a shop you know you can trust. Have you owned it since new? What is the total mileage, if not? I'd guess they are like many other dealers, and trying to stick it to you. You may need some, but probably not all of that stuff.
 

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I would do as someone else suggested and find a friend or invest in basic tools , watch a couple videos and do it yourself for the cost of parts. I embarrassed the crap out of the Subaru service advisor after I took my car in for an alignment and he told me I needed new spark plugs (I had just changed them) and they wanted to charge $395 and some change for changing out 4 spark plugs. He had nothing to say when I told them that each plug from NGK cost 8 bucks and it took half hour to swap them out. It's to bad dealerships/OEM's abuse their positions.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have a 43,000 mile 2015 SRT 392, and it still has its original rotors. I'd definitely get it checked out by a shop you know you can trust. Have you owned it since new? What is the total mileage, if not? I'd guess they are like many other dealers, and trying to stick it to you. You may need some, but probably not all of that stuff.
I bought it from the factory, delivered in Jul 15 I'm retired and its my only car. I dont drive more than 15-20 miles a week 3.5k ish so far, but it is stop and go city traffic. The other 15k is mostly interstate with with some play time.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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I didnt mean to imply that they were recommending immediate change but that it would be in the near future. And other than a little squealing from time to time they feel like they should.
Preventative maintenance is certainly important, especially on brakes. But fortunately for us, they will tend to let us know in advance of getting in so bad of shape that replacement will cost more than it would have otherwise. What I mean by that is the brakes aren't like some other systems on the car which require regular parts replacement regardless of how you feel they are performing. If they are still performing as you would expect them to, and they are not making any wicked noises or vibrations, then there is no need for parts replacement, regardless of age or mileage.

So you can absolutely ask any service dept. tech (whether in the dealership or at a corner garage) to inspect your brakes for wear and such, but if they recommend replacing anything, you should insist upon being shown the evidence they used to arrive at their decision. And don't be reticent to ask to have any aspects of that decision explained in further detail if it doesn't make sense to you right away. If they can't show you worn-out parts, or explain to you why a brake rotor should be replaced even though you have felt no vibration or loss of braking, then they should NOT be given the benefit of the doubt, and a 2nd opinion on the matter should be sought before proceeding.

And if any service tech objects to any part of that, whether it's showing you the reason, explaining to you the details, or allowing you to get a 2nd opinion, they should not be trusted with your car or its service IMO.



I should also say that, while never tracked, at least 500 miles on empty mountain roads. Not recklessly( and mostly in the lines as there are such this as logging trucks and rocks around here lol), but I did work the the car and the brakes hard a quite a few times.

Given your car's elevated trim level and the upgraded brake components that come as a part of that, I would say you have nothing to fear with that kind of vehicle and braking operation. It is all well within the designed operating thresholds of that car's brakes, and honestly, it sounds as if you probably haven't even taxed them to a serious degree yet. I believe you should feel secure in their ability to handle everything you have thrown at it so far and still come out in great condition, mechanically speaking.

If there were any serious vibrations or screeching/grinding noises going on, then I would be concerned that you had pushed the brakes beyond their allowable limits. And in that scenario, they would certainly mandate a service inspection and possible part replacement.



I don't mind paying a shop that stands behind their work, and I wouldn't ride in a car I worked on. I don't mind and can afford to pay a reasonable price, I just dont want to work on it is just not my thing. Plus the start up costs of the tools. If I can pay 500-1000 every 25000 miles for brakes, I can deal with it.

That's understandable, and there's nothing wrong with that approach. It does have the disadvantage of allowing for unscrupulous service departments to possible take advantage of you, but that's something I think you can mitigate with some of the suggestions I've noted above.



I get my joy from driving it. Its long story, but I live a long way from where I grew up, and I dont know anybody I can ask that knows about cars. I am completely lost when it comes to cars, and the dealer probably do saw me coming the day I bought it. And with no one to ask, I don't know which shop to trust not to screw me.

You are not alone there, and it's a sad day indeed when you have to worry about possibly being screwed by dishonest shops for work on your car. But it is a fact of life, unfortunately, and so we have to do the best we can to avoid the crooked joints and give our hard-earned money to the shops and techs that deserve it. Some of us do that by just performing the work ourselves, but not everyone can obviously, so a different approach much be used.

I would say bring it by my house, and I'll do any of the service maintenance tasks I know how to do for free. Just bring me the parts and keep me company while I'm getting dirty or scraping my knuckles on it, and the labor will be gratis on any Challenger you drive. However, your geographic location pretty much prevents that option, so we're back to having to find out which places you can trust and which to avoid.

As a general rule, you can trust the dealership service departments, but obviously some are more gung-ho than others. If you cannot find one you absolutely love and trust, you can still use one like this place you've got the estimate from, but just makes sure they show you why they are replacing something and explain why it needs to be replaced. If they cannot, view that service with suspicion.



I have thought of trading it in on a 370z or something in that 30-40k range that is sporty instead of buying brakes. Basically I don't know how to tell a good mechanic making an honest buck, to one who will take advantage of me. I admit it is a character flaw :)

NOOOOOOOOOO!!!! Don't trade your Challenger in!!

Okay, let's tap the brakes (pun intended)...how about this: you give me 3 weeks lead time, a list of the stuff I'll be working on, and have the parts ready when I get there, and I will drive up there anytime you need some work done and do it myself. Deal?!?

I may have to sleep on your couch for a night or two while I'm getting everything done, but I promise to degrease myself before crashing out and dirtying anything up. Deal?!?!?

Whatever you do, don't get rid of your Challenger for another car. You'll be sad, the Challenger will be sad, and worst of all, the universal balance of good and evil that exists in perpetuity because of our Challenger ownership will be upset by the subtraction of your single Challenger!!

So no rash decisions, okay?!?!

We can work this out, we can come to an amicable resolution!! Just keep the lines of communication open!!!

- Nuke
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Nuke you alright. Tomorrow I drive to Denver for 10ish days, and I will, per your suggestion when I get back, hit a couple of places for wear inspections. As far as you driving up here to work on my car, you crazy! that ain't a cheap trip it would be unreasonable to ask that of you but I do have family near New Orleans that I need to see, maybe I'll hit you up on the way past. Might fly though again the money, I aint poor, but I aint rich either. Would be mostly likely be around Thanksgiving or Christmas.if I still need help I just might open a line of communication and drop by, if at that time it is convenient for ya
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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BTW: if you had the time and/or the desire to truly separate the trustworthy shops from the untrustworthy ones when it comes to working on your car, you could go around to the various places that you would feel comfortable giving business and asking them to inspect your brakes for any problems and recommend necessary service.

I suspect you'll encounter 2 or 3 different types of automotive shops while doing this:

1. You would get some that see you like the dealership you've already visited see you - as someone from whom they could extract some money out of, at least once, maybe more than once.

- These types of places can be identified by their extravagant service write-ups for things not truly necessary and for prices which guarantee them a hefty profit.

- These places are best avoided if possible obviously.


2. You would hopefully get a couple that see you in a little better light, but still not completely on the level - as someone they could turn into a long-time customer by treated well, but still attempt to extract as much money out of you as possible on each visit.

- These types of places can be identified by their less extravagant service write-ups for things possibly needed, but possibly not needed. The lack of a clear explanation on why things are being replaced would be an indication of this type of shop's true intentions.

- These places can be used in the absence of any better options, but in an ideal situation, they could be avoided as well, when possible.


3. You may run the rare unicorn if you're lucky - a shop that will be honest with you and treat you with respect in all scenarios, choosing instead to win you over as a life-time customer with which a relationship can be established and groomed so that honesty is implicit and trust is easy to come by, on both ends.

- These types of places are truly unicorns. They are few and far between these days. In fact, some people will tell you they no longer exist.

- You would be able to identify them in this specific scenario by their bare-bones service write-up and estimate for your car which confirmed your brakes are in good working order and do NOT need any parts replaced at the time being, but that you should consider allowing them to do a brake fluid flush on your car because it is approaching the factory-recommended service interval for both time and mileage.

- Doing a brake fluid flush/replace on your car would not net them much profit at all. In fact, they would barely make anything from doing it - just whatever their mark-up on the brake fluid is would be all. But that's the honest-to-goodness assessment of the situation most likely, and in treating you fairly like this, surely they could be viewed as a place looking to cultivate a life-time relationship with you as a customer. And in so doing, I would sincerely hope you consider giving them your future business, no matter what it entailed.


Like I said, going through all that would take some time and effort, and you may not have it to spare or even be interested in expending it if you do. But it is one possible approach to finding yourself a trustworthy shop, and so I wanted to bring it up. And also because I would be supremely interested in seeing how things turned out if someone were to set off on such a excursion :grin2:
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Nuke you alright. Tomorrow I drive to Denver for 10ish days, and I will, per your suggestion when I get back, hit a couple of places for wear inspections. As far as you driving up here to work on my car, you crazy! that ain't a cheap trip it would be unreasonable to ask that of you but I do have family near New Orleans that I need to see, maybe I'll hit you up on the way past. Might fly though again the money, I aint poor, but I aint rich either. Would be mostly likely be around Thanksgiving or Christmas.if I still need help I just might open a line of communication and drop by, if at that time it is convenient for ya
PM me anytime you're in the area!
 

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Every time I read a thread like this it's makes me want to open my own shop when I retire from the Army. I've had my fair share of BS write ups from a dealer, not to mention things mysteriously going wrong after a vehicle was in their shop. I truly try to avoid going to a dealer or any mechanic unless I have to. Now at the risk of getting "Nuked" I'm going to pump the brakes a little....

I will say that I've had nothing but great experiences dealing with Luke @ stevewhitemotors. So.... not all of them are bad. Anyhow, I would love to be that unicorn and maybe I'll go through with it. I've been trying to figure out what to be when I grow up lately anyhow....

Good Luck OP!


Signing off from somewhere in the Universe...
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Every time I read a thread like this it's makes me want to open my own shop when I retire from the Army. I've had my fair share of BS write ups from a dealer, not to mention things mysteriously going wrong after a vehicle was in their shop. I truly try to avoid going to a dealer or any mechanic unless I have to. Now at the risk of getting "Nuked" I'm going to pump the brakes a little....

I will say that I've had nothing but great experiences dealing with Luke @ stevewhitemotors. So.... not all of them are bad. Anyhow, I would love to be that unicorn and maybe I'll go through with it. I've been trying to figure out what to be when I grow up lately anyhow....

Good Luck OP!


Signing off from somewhere in the Universe...
I would love to find a veteran owned shop, since I'm a vet myself, but South Oregon isn't really where a lot of vets retire or ETS (low population round here in general compared NC) I take it you are or have been Airborne, woohah, I'm a 5 jump chump. Probably the only brand new private, who went to Airborne school right after basic who requested/volunteered for 82nd as his first duty station, and did not get assigned there. They sent me to Korea instead lol
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Every time I read a thread like this it's makes me want to open my own shop when I retire from the Army. I've had my fair share of BS write ups from a dealer, not to mention things mysteriously going wrong after a vehicle was in their shop. I truly try to avoid going to a dealer or any mechanic unless I have to. Now at the risk of getting "Nuked" I'm going to pump the brakes a little....

I will say that I've had nothing but great experiences dealing with Luke @ stevewhitemotors. So.... not all of them are bad. Anyhow, I would love to be that unicorn and maybe I'll go through with it. I've been trying to figure out what to be when I grow up lately anyhow....

Good Luck OP!


Signing off from somewhere in the Universe...
Yes, thanks for pointing that out. I agree there are absolutely some good dealership service departments out there.

I happen to know of one locally (Classic Dodge of Denton) which I have taken both of the Challengers I've owned to for service, and I have always been pleased with their work and my treatment in general.

Some dealerships service departments are no bueno por caca. Some are as valuable as their weight in gold. I wish everyone that encountered a bad one would also have the opportunity to encounter a good one, but based upon the general sentiment we all hear, that's just not the case.

The bad ones deserve our ire for sure, but I would caution everyone from using a blanket judgement on ALL dealership service departments, distrusting them from the get-go, just because of past experiences. There are some good ones out there, but unfortunately they seem to be outnumbered by the bad ones if anecdotal evidence is to be believed. :slant:
 
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