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There is an endless rabbit hole to go down into and it can become an obsession. I used up hours and hours of my time tuning my system, but I really enjoyed doing it and I rediscovered how much wonderful music is out there and how great it could sound in a car. I had a 500 mile commute twice a month up until COVID and that system helped me look forward to it.

But....I would say that you can go bit by bit and enjoy every little bit of improvement until you feel like doing more. Speaker swap-wow-what a difference! Aftermarket simple crossover amps-even better. Then a sub- Holy moly! Then the DSP-Nirvana! I would recommend you start from the simple things but once you add amps, get a good low-level or optical output interface. At minimum it will make your amps sound better and preserve the car interface with added amps, giving you clean sound no matter what you do. At best it allows you to add complexity and tuning as much as you'd like and you can stop any time. Then if you add a DSP it will give you a new hobby, but if you love music, it will be worth it. No matter what you listen to, artists that care about their art will produce it well (if they can), and having a good system really lets it shine. One thing great about a DSP, although I think @jtrosky may have a different opinion, is that you can get great sound out of lower-priced speakers with a DSP, so you can consider that aspect a partly reducing the ultimate cost of a system. I was able to tune my Infinity Reference speakers to coax some high quality out of them, but I admit I spent a lot of time trying to figure out and eliminating a harshness they had around 1200 Hz. That's another subject!
 

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One thing great about a DSP, although I think @jtrosky may have a different opinion, is that you can get great sound out of lower-priced speakers with a DSP, so you can consider that aspect a partly reducing the ultimate cost of a system. I was able to tune my Infinity Reference speakers to coax some high quality out of them, but I admit I spent a lot of time trying to figure out and eliminating a harshness they had around 1200 Hz. That's another subject!
Actually, I don't completely disagree with you regarding your point about speakers and a DSP (and how the DSP allows you to overcome some issues with speakers). However, that being said - a DSP can only do so much with the speakers. Frequency response is only one aspect of a speaker.

Just a "for example".... While I think the Kenwood KFC XP6903C set is great for the price, I found that I had to dig a big dip out of the frequency response between 2khz and 4khz in order to avoid "harshness" at higher volumes (from the 3.5" coaxial dash speakers) - even though the RTA response of the speaker looked the same as some better speakers I upgraded to later (before I dug out a big dip between 2khz and 4khz with the Kenwoods). My guess is that the lower quality speakers just have more distortion - especially at higher volumes.

I had the same harshness with the Infinity speakers (which I couldn't completely tune out) as well as with the Kenwood 3.5" speakers (which I could tune out a lot more), but I didn't have the issue with the Illusion Audio C3CX (3" coaxial), the Audiofrog GS25 (2.5" wideband) or my current dash speakers, which are my favorite of them all, the CDT Audio Unity 8.0 (2" aluminum cone wideband with a stated freq response of 200hz - 33khz!). The Unity 8.0 speakers are just so smooth and detailed, without any harshness at all. Love them.

So yes, I do agree that DSP's can help overcome some issues with a speaker (frequency response mainly), but they can't overcome every issue with a speaker.
 
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