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Are we going to be able to use the the U7135 tuner with the 392? Does anyone know?
Nope only for the 5.7 and 6.1 engines, heard that Diablo is still trying to work on a tune for the 6.4 so not sure how long that will take.
 

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They are waiting for donor cars in the FL area. Free tuner for any donor car.
 

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The ability to wring more power from the engine by adjusting fuel trims and spark advance really depends on how much Dodge is allowing the 392 to take advantage of 93 octane. The SRT engineers say the 392 will make more power on 93 octane than on 91 octane (which was used to rate the engine HP and TQ).

There is only so much which can be wrung out of any gasoline engine before it starts to knock (i.e., pre-ignition piston rattle) on 93 octane and that's the limit.

Beyond the power increases, there will be the normal tuner options for rev limit, tire size (speedo cal), CAI, auto trans shift firmness and shift points, etc.
 

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The big issue is figuring out how the changes in the vehicle architecture impacts ability to modify the ECU information. Very little information is available on just what equipment is in the 2011 Challengers.

The 2011 Challengers are using a hybrid system with some old parts (2010 CANbus system) and some new parts (2011 FlexRay based communication system). I have not seen any info yet whether the old NGC4 controller is used or something new. The communication protocols changed along with the communication gateway(s)(now there are two). The OBDII port wiring also changed, so nothing that worked on 2010 models and older will function, such as code readers, scangauge, dashawk, dashdaq, predator, superchips, etc.

Last I heard, Chrysler had not released cal ids, and one shop told me it would likely be a year or longer before a tuner "might" be available. The 2011 300 and Charger went to a full FlexRay based system that is far more advanced and completely different than anything used before, so it is basically ground zero on them.

If the Challenger still uses the NGC4 controller, and the communications can be figured out, then something should be possible at some point. But it may be a long wait.

Can someone with a 2011 Challenger post up a picture of the ECU so we can see what is used???
 

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The big issue is figuring out how the changes in the vehicle architecture impacts ability to modify the ECU information. Very little information is available on just what equipment is in the 2011 Challengers.

The 2011 Challengers are using a hybrid system with some old parts (2010 CANbus system) and some new parts (2011 FlexRay based communication system). I have not seen any info yet whether the old NGC4 controller is used or something new. The communication protocols changed along with the communication gateway(s)(now there are two). The OBDII port wiring also changed, so nothing that worked on 2010 models and older will function, such as code readers, scangauge, dashawk, dashdaq, predator, superchips, etc.

Last I heard, Chrysler had not released cal ids, and one shop told me it would likely be a year or longer before a tuner "might" be available. The 2011 300 and Charger went to a full FlexRay based system that is far more advanced and completely different than anything used before, so it is basically ground zero on them.

If the Challenger still uses the NGC4 controller, and the communications can be figured out, then something should be possible at some point. But it may be a long wait.

Can someone with a 2011 Challenger post up a picture of the ECU so we can see what is used???
You lost me at "The big issue". :lol:
 

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It should be on the left side of engine compartment in a cavity behind the crosspiece at base of hood, right in the corner. If still like the earlier 300C, should see a 13mm bolt holding the bracket down. With bolt removed, comes straight up and out.
 

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The OBDII port wiring also changed, so nothing that worked on 2010 models and older will function, such as code readers, scangauge, dashawk, dashdaq, predator, superchips, etc.
Are you sure about this. OBDII is a standard to protect smaller shops against this kind of thing, so they can diagnose errors. That's why there are standard error codes as well. If they change the wiring it's no longer OBD compliant.
 

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Are you sure about this. OBDII is a standard to protect smaller shops against this kind of thing, so they can diagnose errors. That's why there are standard error codes as well. If they change the wiring it's no longer OBD compliant.
Very good point!
 

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Are you sure about this. OBDII is a standard to protect smaller shops against this kind of thing, so they can diagnose errors. That's why there are standard error codes as well. If they change the wiring it's no longer OBD compliant.
Yes I am positive about this. In fact, I saw the bulletin from the manufacturer of Chrysler's diagnostics tools to the dealers telling them they would need a new cable (SmartCable) in order to connect to the newer vehicles as the port wiring changed as there are now two communications channels.

Now when I say the port wiring changed, let me clarify. The 16-pin J1962 diagnostic connector commonly used for OBDII did not change itself, but the pin functions have changed. They no longer feature a “Diagnostics CAN C Bus”, and now have both a high speed CAN-C Bus and an internal high speed CAN-IHS bus.

Also, OBDII is an emissions only standard associated with the Federal Clean Air Act, and has little to do with the actual architecture used in a vehicle by a specific manufacturer. It only specifies emissions related requirements. The 16-pin J1962 diagnostic connector was specified as part of OBDII, but only certain pins had assigned functions.

OBD-2 connectors must have pins 4 & 5 for ground connections and pin 16 for 12 volt power supply from the vehicle battery.

There is a requirement (unrelated to OBDII) that auto manufacturers must make certain information available to the repair industry, but there is nothing that says the manufacturers can not adopt new technology that would require the purchase of new or updated equipment. The tools are out there for purchase, and a shop can purchase a subscription to manufacturers data of their choice so that they can flash modules if that is something they choose to do. (These are only the same flash files the dealer would use, there is no programming ability)

All of the diagnostic code reader companies are having to adapt just as all the professional diagnostic equipment manufacturers are having to adapt.

The following is from the manufacturer of the diagnostics tools for Chrysler.

PowerNet Vehicle Architecture

The first vehicles built with the PowerNet vehicle architecture are 2011MY JC, LX, and LD. Vehicles with the PowerNet vehicle architecture do not contain a FCMCGW (Forward Control Module Central Gateway) or a TIPMCGW (Totally Integrated Power Module Central Gateway), and thus do not contain a Diagnostic CAN-C bus. They feature a CAN-C bus and a CAN-IHS bus, both which are connected directly to the 16-pin J1962 diagnostic connector as follows:

CAN-C pins 6 and 14 high-speed CAN
CAN-IHS pins 3 and 11 internal high-speed CAN

The StarMOBILE device cannot support vehicles with the PowerNet vehicle architecture* or the Fiat 500 when the standard vehicle cable is used. The StarMOBILE device contains only one high-speed CAN transceiver. When the standard vehicle cable is used, StarMOBILE can only support CAN communication on J1962 diagnostic connector pins 6 and 14. In order to support the second CAN bus that is present at the J1962 diagnostic connector on vehicles with PowerNet architecture and the Fiat 500, the StarMOBILE Smart Cable must be used. The StarMOBILE Smart Cable contains a second high-speed CAN transceiver that provides the StarMOBILE device the ability to support both the CAN-C and the CAN-IHS buses on vehicles with PowerNet architecture. It also contains a low-speed CAN transceiver that provides the ability to support both the CAN-C and the CAN-B buses on the Fiat 500.
 

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OBDII is not an emissions standard, it's a diagnotics standard. Hence the name OBD (On Board Diagnotstics). There are several protocol standards in OBDII like CAN, PWM, VPW, etc... The star mobile device does more than read diag codes. It also reads manufacturer specific codes, as does the dash hawk and most programmer/flashers. Manufacturers are free to implement their own pids, dtcs and protocols as long as they also implement the standard OBD functions. j1962 defines pinoutputs for pins 1 - 16 but leaves pins 8, 9, 12, and 13 unassigned and pin 1 implementation is left up to the manufacturer. Pins 6, 14, 3, and 11 were already for the can hi and low bus.

I completely believe that you are correct and current progarmmers will not work as each manufacturer implements this their own way. For example, on the old EECV fords using PWM one of the spare pins in the connector was required to be charged to 18 volts for ECU reprogramming. Chrysler may have changed theirs too. I'd be suprised if plain old DTC scanners stopped working, but I can't find any information where scanners say they support 2011's, I also can't find any information that excludes 2011's either (like new model numbers, firmware upgrades, cable changes, etc).

I had heard that the requirement for reprogramming over the OBDII port was going away, which would lock out aftermarket programmers. The aftermarket will find a way around this even if it means performing PCM swaps or sending out your PCM for reprogramming. I don't know if this has happened yet, I think as of 2010 they were supposed to be allowed to do this, but don't know if they have yet. Probably not because it's a big pain for the dealers to have to retool as well.

I don't do any work with OBDII hardware, but I have done work with OBDII software in the past. So while I am familiar with the software standards and communications protocols I am no expert with the hardware side.

Just my $.02
 
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