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Fiat-Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) won’t bring a major redesign to its large car lineup until at least 2020.

The Dodge Charger and Challenger won’t make their move onto the new Giorgio platform until the 2021 model year, while the Chryler 300 is expected to be axed at the same time. The Giorgio platform underpins the new Alfa Romeo Giulia and will offer both of Dodge’s big cars a significant weight loss.

Until that switch over happens, FCA will refresh these cars once again in 2018, following in the footsteps of a major refresh in 2015 that brought a boost to sales. With speciality models like the Hellcat, FCA has been able to boost profit margins and keep interest in these cars despite their dated platform.

The Giorgio platform will have to be stretched and widened to accept the next-generation Charger and Challenger, while it is also rigid enough to spawn a convertible variant, likely to be called the Barracuda if it makes it to production.

When this change over happens, it is expected that the Chrysler 300 will be no more. FCA is slowly working away from its badge-engineered vehicles and eliminating the 300 from the Chrysler’s lineup is another step in keeping each brand separate.
Read more about the Dodge to Redesign Charger and Challenger in 2020, Chrysler 300 Likely Axed at AutoGuide.com.
 

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Looking at a glance doesn't seem like the Alfa Romeo is a smaller vehicle. I assumed before I looked up the vehicle.
Still curious to what this will bring.
 

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So I heard rumors about big V-8's going away, and also going into smaller cars. Is this the first step?
The Hellcat was a huge success. The V8 isn't going away any time soon.
Very true. Just wondering if maybe they're starting to head in that direction. Just speculating really. I love how dodge sort of stuck to their roots with the big and heavy cars, just going to be a little upset if and when the time comes that they go in a different direction.
 

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Very true. Just wondering if maybe they're starting to head in that direction. Just speculating really. I love how dodge sort of stuck to their roots with the big and heavy cars, just going to be a little upset if and when the time comes that they go in a different direction.
If the Dart is any indication...

Hopefully it's replacement is more reliable or more fun.

Both would be nice.
 

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Looking at a glance doesn't seem like the Alfa Romeo is a smaller vehicle. I assumed before I looked up the vehicle.
Still curious to what this will bring.
The current Alfa Guila can only accommodate a V6 engine - the top model is a twin-turbo V6. If a V8 is planned for the future LA chassis replacement, like the 1st post article mentions, FCA would need to modify the Giorgio platform to make that possible.

Think of in these (historic reference terms) the old A-body Barracuda had limits on what could fit into the engine bay. When the E-body version was being designed, the larger B-body cowl (wider) was used to allow engines from Slant 6, LA, B/RB and Street Hemi engines to be fitted.

The Alfa Guilia is close to the size of the BMW 3 / 4 series, so that would give an idea of the rough dimensions and overhangs. The proportions are different from how the LA chassis is currently at.

Length / Width / Height

Alfa:

182.6" / 73.7" / 56.1"

LA Challenger:

198" / 76" / 56"
 

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I think we all knew that the Challenger was going to get smaller/lighter which is the reason I got my '16. This big body car will stay with me until I'm 6 feet under. It's not too say that I won't get a newer Challenger but I'm sure the styling cues won't be as "retro" as the current car.
 

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This gets pushed out further into the future each and every year. FCA will likely undergo a "reorg" before this date becomes the present. This is really non-news frankly, no actionable content of any kind...
 

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My guess is that in 2018 they will tweak the grill, tail lights and introduce a new option package to keep the model "updated" for a couple years more. Maybe the awd GT version with updated grill and tail lights to make pre 2017 models look dated, lol.

Yet for a platform as outdated as it is, sales have only grown year over year.

I hope to trade mine in on a T/A in 2017 if my work situation improves.
 

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Wow. 2020 will make 13 years for the current Challenger model run! The original 1970s run was only 5 years.

So much for having an exclusive car. They will be as common as Mustangs. Start driving those garage queens!

If Dodge is sticking to retro cues, could a refresh resemble the 1972 Challenger?




 

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Wow. 2020 will make 13 years for the current Challenger model run! The original 1970s run was only 5 years.

So much for having an exclusive car. They will be as common as Mustangs. Start driving those garage queens!

If Dodge is sticking to retro cues, could a refresh resemble the 1972 Challenger?




The only other muscle car / pony car that had a long run of the same series

Fox platform Mustang '79 - '93

2nd Gen Camaro / Firebird '70 - '81
 

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Redesign of the Challenger / Charger is old news. The date of the redesign is old news. No matter what the redesign looks like, some will love it and some will hate it. Whether it's called Challenger, Barracuda, or Aardvark doesn't matter.

The real questions: Can the new car still be built in Brampton? How long does it take to make all of the stamping dies to form new sheet metal? How long does it take to change all the dies on the production line? What has to happen to reprogram all the welding and painting robots? And then there are all of the other components that make up the car. How long does it take to make all of that stuff and build up an inventory to start production? What about training workers to build a new car? And training mechanics at the dealers (yes they are trained, don't say bad things about mechanics at dealers)? And then there is a whole lot of crash testing needed by the federal government. And EPA testing of any new engine. Answering these questions will give a good insight into the look and timing of the new car.
 

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^^^ Agreed. I saw a piece on Netflix about the design of the new gen. Mustangs. Correct me if I'm wrong but I think it took them something like 6 years from concept to production.
 

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Redesign of the Challenger / Charger is old news. The date of the redesign is old news. No matter what the redesign looks like, some will love it and some will hate it. Whether it's called Challenger, Barracuda, or Aardvark doesn't matter.


I'd drive a Dodge Aardvark as long as its MOPAR. Sounds interesting, hehe.
 

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Can someone help me understand the 300 / badge engineering / termination conclusion?

I'm reading it as the 300 would not be sold in Europe as the Lancia whatever, not that it would be terminated in US.

I'm thinking the 300 is NOT badge engineered here, but there. Anyone else, or other knowledge?
 

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The only other muscle car / pony car that had a long run of the same series

Fox platform Mustang '79 - '93

2nd Gen Camaro / Firebird '70 - '81
Although more a sports car than a typical muscle car, the C3 Corvette ran from '68-'82. 15 yrs is a LONG time on the same platform! Yet, some of the highest production numbers where had, when the C3 platform was middle aged and older.
 

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I just hope they give enough warning to let me get a last year of the current platform. Not interested in any smaller vehicle.
 
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