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To make a long story short an unexpected job change and move has me and my 2019 Challenger R/T Scat Pack living in the Pacific Northwest. Even though it's only September I've found that the back end breaks loose from time to time with all the damp / wet roads and wicked hill angles. It's terrifying to think what it's going to be like once the cold temps and winter rains / snow hits. I'd like to think that putting winter wheels / tires on it would prevent "white knuckle" situations, but I'm not so sure with the high horsepower / torque on these beasts. Snow and ice doesn't scare me... but black ice with steep hills and huge drop offs on the shoulders of roads does. What do you think? Is driving a Scat Pack year round in my kind of a situation stupid? I have a deal on a loaded Wrangler in place... I'm just questioning if the right move is to pull the trigger. I'd love your thoughts. (PS: No... I can't get an additional winter driver... I only have the room for one car.)
 

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What tires do you have on the car now? 3 season tires will get hard as a rock under 40*. I think you would be good with an extra set of wheels with winter tires.

I'll let others chime in here...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What tires do you have on the car now? 3 season tires will get hard as a rock under 40*. I think you would be good with an extra set of wheels with winter tires.

I'll let others chime in here...
Right now I'm running the standard all season tires that come on the car. Like I said, I'm thinking that winter wheels / tires will absolutely help, but I'm not sure they're going to be "solve everything" solution with this car what with all the black ice and steep hills around here.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Right now I'm running the standard all season tires that come on the car. Like I said, I'm thinking that winter wheels / tires will absolutely help, but I'm not sure they're going to be "solve everything" solution with this car what with all the black ice and steep hills around here.
A set of real winter tires can only be an improvement over the all season (aka no season) tires. If other vehicles can navigate the roads with black ice and steep hills barring other vehicles having tracks instead of tires your car should be able to as well. It comes down to really tires and the the driver.
 

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A set of real winter tires can only be an improvement over the all season (aka no season) tires. If other vehicles can navigate the roads with black ice and steep hills barring other vehicles having tracks instead of tires your car should be able to as well. It comes down to really tires and the the driver.
All the other vehicles around here are mostly Jeeps, Subarus, and pickups...
 

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I've been driving hot rod's around Washington for 40 years, just back off the gas pedal and pay attention to your driving. If it is a big problem, throw a set of studded tires on the back and take it easy in the winter time.
 

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All the other vehicles around here are mostly Jeeps, Subarus, and pickups...
It ain't the going that's the problem its the steering and braking, and all of those vehicles are equal in that just two wheels/tires steer and 4 work to slow the vehicle down.

It comes down to tires. (I saw a video of a 4 wheel drive pickup truck on the fashionable mud tires slide down an slick freeway off ramp -- fortunately there was room on the shoulder so I don't believe any contact was made -- when those tires failed to grip.)
 

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there is a reason why most people with nice, more higher HP cars in this neck of the woods, have more than one vehicle...normally that includes a somewhat trashed jeep, 4x4 or AWD whatever, just for the winter conditions. In some areas, it can be down right treacherous, so much so every year there are certain roads, passes, bridges, etc that are closed to traffic during peak winter / ice storm season.
Your risk is not only your car sliding into a ditch or off a cliff, but the idiot drivers you must share the road with, many of whom drive like they are the only ones on that snowy stretch of roadway.
 

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My wife will be driving her 18 T/A to work year round between seattle and Mountlake Terrace, fortunately if even a flake of snow touches queen anne hill she gets the day off.
If it gets bad like it did last year, she has the 97 Ram to drive around town.....
 
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