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One of the few downsides to livin in the country-side is the dust. Our roads are oil and rock (hate it when they "refresh" every year!). One trip to town and my car is covered with dust; mostly noticeable on the backside (tail lights, reare bumper). And lets be real, I don't want to wash my car every day so what are my options? I've owned California Car Dusters before and they do a nice dusting job in just a matter of a few minutes. But am I damaging the paint or introducing swirls? Any other options besides buying a no-touch car wash membership and going through it daily? I've just purchased a mint-condition Scatpack, B5 Blue Metallic and it looks awesome! I don't want to ruin it!
 

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I hear mixed reviews on the dusters. I imagine it comes down to proper use. I've never personally used one. There are also waterless and rinseless washes. I don't believe any method will prevent them but they can definitely minimize.

Since putting a coating on my car it's much less prone to dust now. I can go over a week now and the car stays mostly dust free mind you I'm not often on gravel roads.

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I live in a new house in a new subdivision with construction still going on around me. It is really dusty with trucks and other equipment stirring it up every day. I use a California Duster daily to take the dust off and if it gets too bad, I use waterless car wash to get the stuff that is stuck to the paint. I see no evidence of scratches or swirl marks on my car. If it is really dirty like after a rain, I take it to the coin wash first and use rinse only to get the heavy stuff off and then use the waterless wash to finish it. The harsh soaps they use in coin washes and touchless washes will cause more swirl marks than using a duster and waterless wash imo. This method seems to be working for me, since they haven't cemented my driveway yet so I can't really wash it outside.
 

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I use a California Duster almost ever day. I used it for 3 years on my previous Jazz Blue R/T and continue to use it on my '16 SP. I generally go over the car with it before I leave the garage or when I get back and park it. I've never seen any sign whatsoever of any kind of scratches, swirls, or damage. It's such a seriously light touch that I can't imagine how it could harm anything.
 

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I also use a California Duster, occasionally. It does a good job of removing light dust.

When you use it, however, use a "feather" touch and just let the tips of the Duster's threads come in contact with the paint.

Watch the first 2 minutes of this Junkman video for a good illustration.

 

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I use a leaf blower (I carry battery powered for travel and an electric for home) follow with 2 California dusters (1 for roof, hood, trunk area and 1 for lower part of car). I use a swifer and long handled, narrow fuzzy type mitt sprayed with endust for wheels and black plastic trim.
 

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I know there are a lot of advocates of the CA Duster in here so I am not bashing anyone in my following comments in any way.

The fact of the matter is, yes this method is scratching (micro Marring the paint) whenever you touch anything, especially with a layer of dust on it, micro abrasion is taking place. I have seen the first hand work of these dusters more time than i care to remember in the form of straight line scratches. I inspect a vehicle and the surface has a very particular set of directional scratches. These are embedded in the paint from hundreds of repeated movements of the duster-- since people develop a methodology of how to dust.


I do not recommend these to clients. In fact, especially if the color is dark non metallic (typically black) I tell them to LEAVE the dust from the garage. Its just dust and its not hurting anything. Doing this on a daily basis is complete overkill in my opinion. I know, i know, people want their baby lookin her best, but is it worth the possible damage just for a tiny bit of dust?

Its better to leave the dust than to micro abrade the paint many hundreds/thousands of times in 5 years or more.

A great alternative to this would be using compressed air. I recommend having an inline moisture filter, but this will remove dust easily and QUICKLY! We do this in the shop all the time and it is a no touch method that will remove the majority of dust and avoids headaches.


NOW, for those of you who insist on using the duster there are some tips to make it "saf-ER", but in no means harmless.
1] Keep it as clean as possible. So shake after every use and then maintain it so it looks clean and not black as they often get.
2] To help minimize marks in the paint, keep a topical silica sealant on it with high surface tension -- meaning very slick. This will allow the duster to more easily glide over the surface.
3] Some Dusters have detachable heads which you can wash. So I would suggest that.
 

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I'd love an easy method to dust, but I rarely touch my paint. I'm not sliding anything along the dust. I know straight line scratches are preferable to circular scratches because of the way light reflects off them, but no self inflicted scratches is my goal for long term. A Guy
 

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I use a pump sprayer like you spray on weeds - bought it at Lowes - and I fill it with a proper mixture of Ultima waterless wash and water, essentially washing my car, but that waterless wash stuff is about the only thing you can use and not scratch your car. I can now wipe my car down every day or two and keep it almost perfectly clean all the time. Took me a while to adopt the process and products, but this is almost all I use on my cars now. Do not use a California duster.
 

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NOW, for those of you who insist on using the duster there are some tips to make it "saf-ER", but in no means harmless.
1] Keep it as clean as possible. So shake after every use and then maintain it so it looks clean and not black as they often get.
2] To help minimize marks in the paint, keep a topical silica sealant on it with high surface tension -- meaning very slick. This will allow the duster to more easily glide over the surface.
3] Some Dusters have detachable heads which you can wash. So I would suggest that.
Here are the cleaning instructions for a California Duster:

1. Shake the duster out very thoroughly after each time it is used. Do this over a trash can or simply outside away from your vehicle. According to the company that makes it, the dirtier a California Duster is, the better it functions.

2. Wash your California Duster with a mild laundry detergent and cool water if it is very dirty. This should only be done if the duster actually stops lifting dust from the surfaces that it is being used to dust. Fill a container with cold water and some soap and dip the duster in the soap and water mixture. Use your fingers to work the water in between the brushes until the dirt is removed.

3. Rinse the duster with cold, clean water and then let it air-dry. Do not use hot water to wash it or hot air to dry it--this may damage the paraffin waxes in the duster. Be sure that the duster is completely dry before attempting to dust a vehicle.
 

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If the car is dusty I use an air compressor to blow heavy dust off the entire car before using the Cali duster on the top, hood and trunk . The air compressor works well on the rear where the heaviest dust collects. I have horses that constantly make dust at home, oh yeah, and I live in the desert,
Also I wash my car sometimes twice a week, always after the Drags to get the water box water spots and rubber off the rear.
Main reason to wash often is the California duster does not remove the Brembo brake dust from the sides of the vehicle, it's easy to tell it's still there on my car after dusting because it's white.
I have no problem washing my car a lot since I have a big ass carport and everything is ready.
Also I have a Shaker Hood and IT DON'T LEAK WHEN I WASH IT!
 

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Before you get all worried about micro abrasions or whatever you should think about a some things, realistically.

1.) Does it make the care look good in a short amount of time?
2.) Is it easy to do?
3.) Really how long do I plan on keeping this car?
4.) Is there a good body shop in town that I can become friends with the owner?
5.) How long will it take to affect the paint where it is noticeable?
6.) How old am I and how much longer, realistically will I be on this side of the ground?
I mean really some guys in their late 70's and early 80's worry about something that may take a decade to affect their car's appearance.
 

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Before you get all worried about micro abrasions or whatever you should think about a some things, realistically.

1.) Does it make the care look good in a short amount of time?
2.) Is it easy to do?
3.) Really how long do I plan on keeping this car?
4.) Is there a good body shop in town that I can become friends with the owner?
5.) How long will it take to affect the paint where it is noticeable?
6.) How old am I and how much longer, realistically will I be on this side of the ground?
I mean really some guys in their late 70's and early 80's worry about something that may take a decade to affect their car's appearance.
Good points Frank. I am 75 years old and I only keep my cars a year or less, so the California Duster and Waterless Wash method work great for me. I haven't washed my car or gone to car wash in over a month and my car is a daily driver. It always looks great and my buddies always tease me that they saw a speck of dust on my car, lol. I don't care how you clean your car, anything that touches the paint will cause micro abrasions. That is what keeps detailers busy.
 

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Use one all of the time. My car came to me with some slight swirls in the paint. It's a daily driver and not a museum piece, so I'm not concerned with a slight bit of light dust abrasion. I can't imagine this does any greater damage than driving alone does (or heaven forbid some ignorant person running their hand over the dust). I do wash and spray wax the car weekly and clay, polish and paste wax annually. It looks pretty darn good for a six-year-old.
 

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I have the best solution ever.

I bought a white Challenger.

Dust becomes invisible.

Oh yeah.

:) :)
 

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Before you get all worried about micro abrasions or whatever you should think about a some things, realistically.

1.) Does it make the care look good in a short amount of time?
2.) Is it easy to do?
3.) Really how long do I plan on keeping this car?
4.) Is there a good body shop in town that I can become friends with the owner?
5.) How long will it take to affect the paint where it is noticeable?
6.) How old am I and how much longer, realistically will I be on this side of the ground?
I mean really some guys in their late 70's and early 80's worry about something that may take a decade to affect their car's appearance.
Thanks for that, Frank! I was thinking of writing the same thing. I think more of my car than any car I've ever owned. But, it's still a car. I will continue to dust it with my California Duster and won't lose a minute's worth of sleep over some "micro abrasion". There's not a mark or swirl on it and it's slick as glass. I'm not sure I've ever kept a car longer than 3-4 years and this one is no exception. Im 74 years old and it might outlive me.
 

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I'll tell you, I applied Reload to my car 3 weeks ago or so. Usually the car is dusty later the same day it is washed, never mind the next day. Day after it was hardly dusty, coincidence I thought. After a week, the dust that was there blew off. If I wasn't so obsessed with keeping it near perfect, I could have skipped the wash. Now 3 weeks later, I'm convinced the Reload is keeping the dust from sticking. I won't wait 6 months to reapply, it's so easy to do, and let's me shine my coated car. It's not just for coated cars, give it a look. A Guy
 

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I'd love an easy method to dust, but I rarely touch my paint. I'm not sliding anything along the dust. I know straight line scratches are preferable to circular scratches because of the way light reflects off them, but no self inflicted scratches is my goal for long term. A Guy
i have a little $99 pressure washer I got from lowes a couple years ago... for dust, ill throw the foamer on it, rinse it really well, and blow it dry with a little air dryer I have... done. The less touching you do the better.

when its dirty you obviously have to touch it, but for dust, its the foam cannon/pressure washer/air dryer combo I choose :icon_cheers:
 

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I'll tell you, I applied Reload to my car 3 weeks ago or so. Usually the car is dusty later the same day it is washed, never mind the next day. Day after it was hardly dusty, coincidence I thought. After a week, the dust that was there blew off. If I wasn't so obsessed with keeping it near perfect, I could have skipped the wash. Now 3 weeks later, I'm convinced the Reload is keeping the dust from sticking. I won't wait 6 months to reapply, it's so easy to do, and let's me shine my coated car. It's not just for coated cars, give it a look. A Guy
Paint repair is cheaper than rust repair. That is why I will not soak my car like that. I plan on keeping it for a while, and I am friends with the owners of 2 of the best body shops in my small town. And I am 47 years old so I know that (hopefully) before my demise I will have to repaint the whole car 2 to 3 times. (10 to 15 years between paint jobs). If I keep the body solid and straight should require little more than a "Scuff and Repaint".....
 

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Spray on rinse off si02 sealants like reload are a great product. It really will help repel dust like a coating. Depending on brand they seem to last 2 to 6 months. I used mckees hydro blue and highly recommend it.

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