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Discussion Starter #1
So, I've been wondering about this for a while, and I've finally decided to ask this question here specifically.

I've seen a lot people suggest others to simply "save your money and just get a Hellcat" during financial discussions of upgrading Mopar engines. Some suggest to trade in whatever car you have for a used Hellcat.

While this is sound advice that I fully support from a financial standpoint, and with 2015 standard Hellcat warranties ending soon, I've always wondered how much would some of the out of pocket cost be to repair these $60K MSRP'd cars.

So with that said; to anyone that has a Hellcat with an expired or voided warranty, what are some of the repairs you've had to have done? And how much did those repairs cost you? This question includes any and all repairs, fixes, and replacements that warranty wouldn't or won't cover

I'll be posting this question on another forum as well, just to get a broader consensus.

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They are not cheap to fix. Having 2 years/30k on my powertrain was essential when I made the move.

I hope I don't have any issues in, or out of, warranty. Used engines in hellcat groups start around 10k and go up from there; near 20k for one from Mopar. I'm not sure about the trans, however.
 

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No Hellcat experience with any out of warranty (or so far <knock wood> in warranty repairs) but with other cars over the years there were a number of out of warranty repairs needed for various things.

Some related to wear like a worn out (noisy) water pump at 172K miles. With another car the water pump developed a leak at around 110K miles. Roughly $1000 per water pump.

A couple of fuel pumps. 200K miles for one car another at around 120K miles. Again roughly $1000 per fuel pump.

A plastic coolant tank. $750.

A power steering tank to replace a built in noisy high pressure bypass valve. $1000+. (A very fancy tank, aluminum. Had no choice, really. The high pitched whistle was very irritating.)

Several sets of O2 sensors. For one car 4 new ones -- two were of the wide band type -- plus labor cost $1000 to have replaced.

Several radiator motors.

Except for one clutch no drive train issues, well if one doesn't include a rear wheel bearing (~$500) or split CV boots on some axle half shafts. These were removed, bearings cleaned, inspected and found good and after being repacked with grease fitted with new boots and installed back in the car. This work done with 260K miles on the shafts. Even with another nearly 50K miles they were still quiet. New half shafts were $900+ each and this clean/inspect/etc. cost around $900.

Two alternators. The most recent one cost in the ballpark of $1000 (parts/labor).

What is missing from the list is any real serious engine work. The only and most expensive "engine work" -- work that required the engine be opened up -- was the replacement of a variable intake valve timing solenoid/actuator. This ran $3K. Engine stayed in the car but the passenger side camshaft cover had to come off and both cams removed. New solenoid and actuator cost around $1500, with labor and other parts (new camshaft cover bolts, for example, new exhaust manifold bolts) and supplies accounting for the rest.

Most expensive repair was the replacement of all 3 radiators of my Porsche 996 Turbo: $4000. Had to have this done on the road 2K miles from home. Had this happened to me at home my local dealer would have charged less I'm sure and probably been agreeable to using aftermarket (and less expensive and reports have it more durable) radiators.

Had to have a 6-speed manual replaced under warranty. Techs told me if no warranty cost to repair/rebuild to address leaking selector shaft seal and any other issues found after opening up transmission would have run around $6K. Out of pocket replacement cost $10K plus $1K labor to R&R transmission.

No steering, suspension, shock work. A set of motor mounts. Replaced some front sway bar drop links when the original ones had their dust boots fail.

One engine went 317K miles on its coils. While no signs of any trouble had the coils replaced on other engine and engine ran better after. (It also ran better when the O2 sensors were replaced, one was throwing an error code: Bad heater circuit).

317K miles on original accessory drive idler rollers and tensioner roller. However, another engine manifested a noisy idler roller bearing and this was replaced under warranty and I had the tech replace the rest at my expense as a precautionary measure. Some thousands and thousands of miles later the engine developed a noisy idler roller bearing and again I had all replaced, though this time with no warranty to cover at least the one bad bearing.

Estimated replacement cost of Boxster engine was $26K with no core, $17K with core. Turbo engine replacement cost was in the $50K range and I don't recall if that was with or without core.

With the Hellcat the biggies are of course the engine, transmission (manual or auto), diff and last but not least supercharger.

While say the water pump, fuel pump, radiator or radiator fan motor, wheel bearings, u-joints, CV joints are not cheap to replace their cost pales in comparison to what, for example, a new supercharger would cost.

Not sure what a new Hellcat engine would cost. Not sure if a "crate" engine is suitable to use in areas where emissions compliance is required. One might be able to source a suitable replacement engine from a wrecked Hellcat but of course this has some risk. Ditto a 6-speed manual or 8 speed automatic. Depends upon the cost of a new one vs. a used one, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
They are not cheap to fix. Having 2 years/30k on my powertrain was essential when I made the move.

I hope I don't have any issues in, or out of, warranty. Used engines in hellcat groups start around 10k and go up from there; near 20k for one from Mopar. I'm not sure about the trans, however.
That's my biggest concern. The cost to repair these engines out of warranty is pretty costly, but trying to repair a heavily modified 392 engine might be just as expensive, right?

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The 392s clock in a bit cheaper, but to get even close in HP with NO warranty, you're already out a good chunk of change for an FI setup.

@stevewhite can probably be pretty exact on the FI + install cost, and even the out of warranty costs for the HC.
 

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A few years back, a member had supercharger issues on his HC.

Can't remember the reason, but it wasn't covered under warranty.

IIRC, the new supercharger was in the $12k range to replace/install.

392's aren't cheap either, and with heavy mods, even more $$$$.

Bottom line is if you play, you pay. Cost of ownership on one of these cars without a warranty isn't nickels and dimes. At some point in time, big bucks will be needed for an unexpected repair.
 

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The 392s clock in a bit cheaper, but to get even close in HP with NO warranty, you're already out a good chunk of change for an FI setup.

@stevewhite can probably be pretty exact on the FI + install cost, and even the out of warranty costs for the HC.
correct, you really need to forged the bottom end on a 392 in order to gain significant performance and reliability
 
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