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Which models and years have a factory cold air package?
Hellcats? Isn't that what the lower tube is for. And why it's added to Scat's that don't have it? Although I've always been confused as to why people put it on a Shaker. Isn't that what the hood scoop is for?
Not sure on the years.
 

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2010 Mopar 10 Edition Challenger R/T
2014 R/T Shakers
2014 Mopar 14 Challenger R/T
2015 - present Shaker R/T, R/T Scat Pack
2017 - present T/A, T/A 392
2015 - present Hellcat
2018 - Challenger SRT Demon
2019 - present Challenger Hellcat Redeye
2020 - present Challenger Super Stock
 
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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Which models and years have a factory cold air package?
Since at least 2001 a number of various cars I have owned have had "factory cold air package". In fact I was observing the intake air temperature of my new 2001 Camaro Z28 and noted the temperature seemed higher than I expected it to be. Turns out the air box was not assembled correctly and was pulling in air from the engine compartment.

Other brands from Porsche, VW, Pontiac, MINI, and Dodge, based on my monitoring air intake temperature all had factory cold air intake. My 2020 Scat Pack the difference in outside air temperature vs. intake air temperature -- after any heat soak has been dealt with -- runs in the 3F to 5F degree range above ambient. That ain't bad at all.

The exception was my 2018 Hellcat. The air intake was positioned to collect cool outside air but the supercharger heated the air and the liquid cooled charge cooler could only get the intake air temperature down to around 40F over ambient.

The problem is the liquid cooled charge cooler is not very good at cooling.

Be comparison my 996 Porsche Turbo with two turbo chargers used air cooled charge coolers which were very effective at cooling the intake air. Even after passing through the turbo and passing through what seemed like miles of intake tubing the intake air temperature under highway conditions was but 12F to 15F above ambient.

Sure the intake air temperature can be warmer by some considerable amount from heat soak. Or if one is driving in town. This ain't as bad as one might think. Warmed intake air helps ensure better fuel atomization and better combustion right after engine start and when driving in town. But once on the open road intake air temperature drops considerably.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the info. I'm changing to an aftermarket fiberglass early T/A style hood and it comes with air ducts, and an airbox that lets the air out above the filter box. I'm looking into using a stock type air box rather than constructing one. I don't want to spend a couple of hundred dollars on a CAI setup. I don't really want any more power but cooler air is free horsepower. And has to translate to better gas mileage.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Thanks for the info. I'm changing to an aftermarket fiberglass early T/A style hood and it comes with air ducts, and an airbox that lets the air out above the filter box. I'm looking into using a stock type air box rather than constructing one. I don't want to spend a couple of hundred dollars on a CAI setup. I don't really want any more power but cooler air is free horsepower. And has to translate to better gas mileage.
No argument. Cooler intake air is better to a point. There's a limit, though. Too cold of intake air temperature can lower HP but unless you drive in extreme cold probably not a problem.

But the flip side is hotter intake air under some operating conditions can be beneficial. At idle and low engine speed the warmer intake air helps with fuel atomization which results in better more complete combustion. The engine is more tractable at lower engine speeds.

As an aside, years ago I rebuilt the 318CID engine in my Dodge D200 pick up truck. The engine was fitted with a 2 barrel carb and the manifold had the exhaust cross over feature. I had the intake manifold hot tanked -- along with the engine block and heads -- and upon reassembly had this cross over working. Afterwards the engine at idle was so smooth that more than once I got in the truck and tried to start an already running engine. The heat from the cross over really helped atomize the fuel in the intake air after it left the carb.

My point in my earlier reply was that the factory system I think if you bothered to look at the actual intake air temperature values does a pretty good job. The air the engine intake system pulls in is at ambient temperature. Any increase is the result of the hot intake system surfaces the air comes in contact with after it enters the intake system.

Not much you can do about this if you just started a hot engine. The intake system will of course hot soak and this heat then heats the air that passes through it. But as I mentioned above this ain't a bad thing and is really beneficial.

As you drive the car, provided traffic conditions allow for steady forward progress, the heat soak is removed and the intake air temperature drops.

I mentioned my 2020 Scat Pack and after the initial heat soak is dealt with how close to ambient the intake air temperature stays, in the 3F to 5F degree range. If I start out with the engine cold and just drive the car the intake air temperature stays within 3F to 5F of ambient. Of all my cars I have owned and most of them -- all cars I've owned since 1996 -- I have observed intake air temperature in real time the Scat Pack is the best at keeping the intake air temperature closest to ambient air temperature.

This is due to in some part the hood which has two exit vents on either side to help let hot air (that passes through the radiator) escape and a center vent, air scoop, which directs outside and cooler air down over the top of the engine. This hood is very much like the hood my Hellcat had.

By giving the hot air from the radiator an exit before it can blow over the engine and intake system this helps keep the intake system cooler coupled with the center located scoop and as a result the intake air temperature even for a fully up to temperature engine is but 3 to 5 degrees F above ambient once any heat soak has been dealt with.

A similar hood for your car might (might) be beneficial. It depends upon the location of the air box. If this is located in the air stream path of the hot air exiting the radiator this can heat the air box and thus heat any incoming air destined for the engine.
 
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